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rodneybeauchamp

While my back window gently leaks

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Have just spray tested the rear window on my 63 Riviera and confirmed my suspicions that it does leak. Not huge torrents but a gentle weeping under the sealing caulk in the right lower section.

 

 There was already some evidence of rust in both corners of the parcel shelf so it was really no surprise. And the comments in posts on this forum were the reason I checked!

 

1. Am I better off removing the glass myself ( with a helper of course) and cleaning up the pinch weld area properly and then get a professional to re-install the glass. I would say the average glass installer here ( Australia) would not have seen one of these cars of let alone installed glass! However they might have done a Chevy perhaps.

 

2. Am I better off to re-install it myself as well given that I have zero experience but a huge care factor.

 

Can I have some thoughts from those who have faced this dilemma ( with or without the glass of wine)

 

thanks Rodney?

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Gosh are we related by more than both owning a Riviera?  My name is Earl Beauchamp of the Virginia Beauchamp's

 

For the last 15 years I've pronounced the name as "Beacham" like my ancestors did.  For the first 55 years of my life I pronounced it "Bo-shaw-um"

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)

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Installing the glass is not difficult and you can do it yourself.  The hardest part of the whole project is getting the molding off

i picked up a windshield removal tool kit for under $20 off eBay.  The local parts store has the butyl tape you need to reinstall it.   When you put the glass back in you can see the contact area of the butyl tape against the glass and can easily manipulate it with a wooden mixing stick and press the tape to ensure good contact.  

But no matter how you do it.  Do it sooner than later if you already see rust

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The glass replacement isn't a bad job.... but you have me here sitting and grinning remembering personnel inspections on the deck of the USS Arlinton on sunny mornings with the breeze of the South China Sea at our backs. One of my division mates was from the south and his last name was Fulghum. The officers always stopped to ask "What is your name sailor?" He told them loud and clear. Sometimes they asked twice.

 

His family had traditionally used a slightly different pronunciation, silent "l".

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)

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The body service manual shows how to do this. I replaced mine last summer using a tube type caulking for setting windshields . The rear molding clips and their screws can be prone to rusting out, causing leaks into the trunk and rear package shelf. KD 2038 removal tool is what I used to remove the chrome molding. there are many out there but this is what the local auto supply had. Good luck .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OK Riviera  People: I've done this on 5 cars so far. Here's my drill....1

 

1. Douse the surround moldings with WD-40, remove moldings with the proper tool.  

 

2. Clean  the channel as good as possible, remove the back glass with the proper tool.

 

3. Clean every thing in the channel down to as close to bare metal as possible and THEN evaluate the situation.

 

4. Repair as decided.  Make sure the clips are even, uniform and the mounting studs are solid.

 

5. Re-install the glass. Use either the tape or  the Window Weld gobbledy goop.

 

6. Do an immaculate job.

 

7. Re-attach the moldings. 

 

 

 

The reason I suggest doing an immaculate job is because I have never reinstalled these rear windshield surrounds. That's what got us into trouble in the first place, a pool of water that can't drain, dry or go anywhere...except to rust and wick through the entire  body fueling the Tin Worm Armies.  OH...Yes, I've taken a ton of flack about it from everyone!   Mitch

Edited by lrlforfun (see edit history)

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 Another area to check is the decorative molding that goes between the window molding and the trunk lid.  These are attached to the body by studs which are visible from inside the trunk.  The putty like gaskets that are affixed to the nuts for weatherproofing dry out over time and allow water to leak into the trunk.  The window is usually the culprit but check this molding as well.

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When I tore into the metal around the rear window in my 64, you could see right away why they're so prone to leaking.  The rear valance has a lip on it for the glass to set on and the sides have a lip for the glass to set on.  The sides are part of the rear quarter. The valance is a separate piece.  Those separate pieces are cut off at 90° angles to each other. A small piece of curved metal is spot welded in place to join the two but it's not filled in with solder.  It's caulked in.   The caulk dries out, the seal gets old and cracks, and the design just holds water - three strikes from the factory.  Once you're down to the point of taking the glass out and cleaning up the mess, take the time to completely fill in the corners so this won't happen again.  When you get caught in the rain or after you wash the car, make sure you use compressed air to completely get ALL of the standing water out of those corners.

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10 minutes ago, RivNut said:

When you get caught in the rain or after you wash the car, make sure you use compressed air to completely get ALL of the standing water out of those corners.

Bingo.

 

There's no need to avoid driving in the rain, but when the rain stops or you're back in the garage, that's one of the first things to do.

 

 

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I'll second the "immaculate job" suggested earlier, however, I would install the moldings. A proper repair to any rusted areas in the window channel are your best defense. 

 

I have repaired mine twice. The first time was a hack job by the window installer but it got the job done and fit my budger. It was 1984 and I was 19 and had saved up a few bucks to get my Rivy painted at Maaco ($250) but the rear window channel  was rusted and leaked. Trying to learn, I watched as the installer removed and installed the glass. There was a hole in the right lower corner about the size of a golf ball and broken clip studs for the molding. He mixed up a glob of fiberglass and resin to fill the hole and installed new clips with screws. The whole job took him about an hour and a half and charged me I think $60. I mention details of this job because this is how you DON'T want to do the repair although many are done this way and cause more rust in the future.

 

In 1989, I was able to afford a glass-out respray and the rear window area was fixed properly. I was surprised to see the repair was holding, but it was beginning to leak again. Today, there is a trace of rust visible around the molding in the lower corner. Considering the design flaw, I am very happy with my results and the last repair. The moldings were reinstalled and the car never has had a garage but it is covered. Its time for a paint job again and the glass will come out. I'm curious to see how the channel looks today.  

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Many thanks for the replies. Thinking I will tackle it myself and will try to locate a tool for the mouldings .  And Mitch, I am with you on this. Rather take the time to do it properly. 

 

BTW could someone post a photo of what the mouldings clip look like so I know what I'm trying to unclip. The body manual helps but a picture is worth ................

 

PS I had front and rear glass on a 64 Skylark replaced after repainting at a glass repair shop and they appeared to do a professional job.  But then I have Also had a front screen on a Subaru replaced by a mobile glass installer who decided to scratch the paint in several areas on the top cowl panel. Under impressed, hence my hesitation to use a glass installer.

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These are the replacement clips that I found at NAPA. To the left of the bag is an original compared to the new.

 

Steve

Rr Window Clips 001.JPGRr Window Clips 002.JPG

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I found on my 64' the channel behind the glass was rusted through in multiple locations. The screws that hold the moulding clips were also rusted away. From the outside there was no evidence of rust behind there at all. The parcel shelf however had a good about of surface rust on it.
There is a good video on youtube showing how to remove the mouldings (I don't have the link but a search on GM moulding removal should find it). Once you see how, it's fairly easy and the tool from memory was nothing fancy. You can buy replacements from OPGI but they are very expensive and only available for the rear screen (front are shown as available soon but they are actually still in development).
So for me, resealing the window is the least of my worries. As others have said, covering all the channel with a fine but neat coat of sealant should protect it. Interestingly someone had previously patched mine with clear silicon and in those areas there was no rust at all. So there is something to be said for modern sealants and protecting the surface. For glass removal I just used the old wire trick however at one point the glass had somehow fused to the metal and needed a bit of force - the glass is pretty strong fortunately.

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Hi Mozzie,

pictures are worth a thousand words but video clips are priceless. Many many many thanks, certainly gives confidence to something not done before.

 

Rodney

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I couldn't finish watching this. Prying down on the glass to lift the molding up? Sure way to crack a windshield because its laminated and not tempered glass. However, less risky on the back glass as it is tempered. 

 

This is the tool you need. My high school auto body teacher taught me how and warned of the risks even using the proper tool. Mainly when pulling on the clip be careful the tool does not slip because the sharp corners of the tool can snag the edge of the glass cracking it. The tool is thin so it slides right under the molding. Link to proper tool below.

 

http://www.autobodydepot.com/KDT-2038_3.html?gclid=CPOx76LSnNACFQuMaQodQ1ENVQ#.WCOYcC0rKM8 

 

KDT-2038.jpg

Edited by Paul K. (see edit history)

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59 minutes ago, Paul K. said:

Prying down on the glass to lift the molding up? Sure way to crack a windshield because its laminated and not tempered glass.

Paul is very correct here!

 

Years ago I was going to prep my '75 Regal for paint and started removing the trim around the windshield, with a screw driver! It didn't take long at all to crack it, because I was NOT using the right tool!

 

Luckily, I had full coverage insurance, I told my agent exactly what I had done, and got a new one.

 

The molding is simple to remove with the "correct" tool.

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I was really squirming while I watched. And planning to run out to the garage to take a picture of my molding removal tool. It's the same red handle one Paul K. put up. I think mine is 30 years old so they haven't changed the style... or the price, pretty sure it was about $12 or 13 back then.

 

Oh, I also ordered two bags of the clips from NAPA. They were in a warehouse in Maine, so they aren't stock items.

 

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)

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Managed to buy a tool similar to that shown in Mozzies video clip open photo as well as a plastic wedge that will gently lift the mouldings. Have got a friend who is willing to help and think we will both get it right. Will keep all posted.

 

rather be able to drive in the rain without stressing, otherwise where is the enjoyment. Not every day is 70degrees farenheit with 3mph sea breezes. Many thanks for the post replies and happy for more.

Rodney

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