chistech

32' Oldsmobile Deluxe Convertible Roadster

Recommended Posts

Yes, the third part of the rifle stock mixture was bees wax. It took a lot of rubbing to stretch and smooth the wax to bring it up to a dull sheen with very good water proofing of the wood. But don't ask me the recipe, that was 40 years ago and I can't remember it. I think the turps would soak (wick) its way into the wood faster than it would evaporate so should be a good carrier. The kerosene mix might have been meant as the only treatment - kerosene leaving an oily residue that protects the wood from insects and fungus etc.

 

I have also used another linseed oil mix to protect steel inside. 1/3 each of linseed oil, turps and white vinegar. Rub with steel (or plastic) wool to remove the rust and put a good coat on. It dries by evaporation. On the long case clock bells (rods, actually) it took ages because the door was closed! I have an acquaintance who collects black smith-made kitchen utensils and they are all preserved with this method.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was talking with another restorer yesterday about the varnish drying issues I had and about all the sanding/coats I had done. He told me he no longer puts down a lot of coats varnish on his wood. He now puts one or two coats for the color, then will spray Urethane clear coat on the wood. He said he's never had an issue with flexibility of the wood but said there are additives for the Urethane so it is more flexible and they're used when clear coating things like plastic bumpers and noses of cars. Soooooooooooooo, I started thinking, what if I put on a few coats of varnish to add the color I wanted and to help seal the grain of the wheels. Then, paint the steel rim and hubs, along with the sprocket design, which is all black. After all is painted, then clear coat the entire wheel, including the wood spokes. I believe this would make a really nice looking wheel and seal it all up pretty nice from the elements. Thoughts everyone?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it would look fine. Mine only concern would be any reactions the clear coat would have with the varnish. May be a question to ask your painter guy. Hate for you to do all this hard work again and make the wheels look great and then have it get all fish eyed or blistered after they get cleared. Just my $0.02.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm afraid modern clear coat would give a "plastic" look to the spokes that would kill the original look you're going for.  Again, I'm not an expert, but I've always heard that the wood spokes can "breathe" with spar varnish made for wood, while the clear coat will seal them up and cause problems.  Of course, I may have been misinformed - I often am.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with you both. My painter said he would have to apply the clear very light to avoid fish eyes and the clear will also give them an epoxied look, which currently many are using, and it does look kind of plastic. Got all 6 wheels coated again today and with three very thin coats, they are looking very nice. Within a few hours they were almost all dry with just some lightly tacky areas here or there. They are also getting pretty shiny too but it’s a different shiny, not as deep as clear coat can appear. I was looking for a quicker way to finish these wheels and cut down on all the sanding but it’s not time to start cutting any corners. Tomorrow the will get sanded with 320 to start smoothing them down really nice. 

   Using the sprocket pattern my good friend set me, I started cutting out stencils for painting the center hub and pattern.  Piece by piece, it’s coming together and it keeps me motivated. I’ve been working on a customers 31’ Chevy this past year giving it a frame off restoration. I’ve fit the Olds in between waiting for the paint shop. Today they told me most will be done by next week so it wire good to get it back together and shipped to the owner. When I emailed him today to let him know the status of the car, he emailed me back and was excited that it would be soon. He then said he hoped I would be able to take his 34’  Chevy pickup in as soon as possible and give it a full restoration. He had mentioned it last year when he sent his car but I wasn’t sure if he would seeing that the car ran more than the estimate because of a considerable amount of wood rot and it needing replacement. Looks like I’ll be busy again next year. 

 

 I promised I might slip in an “out of thread subject “ picture and seeing I was working in my basement where my modeling bench is, I’m posting a couple pictures of a 58” span WWII Dauntless dive bomber still in construction. It will be powered by an IC engine of .72ci. It is also an overhead valve configuration very similar to the original power plant though it’s only a single cylinder. )

6CAC0CD1-C717-473B-A576-80AAD032D8BF.jpeg

12867BC3-C8B7-46CC-A0C3-9AA0D3670154.jpeg

77C835D9-421A-432B-8341-E82DD8C477C5.jpeg

C330402A-A5AF-4485-A448-AED15CA3D9D0.jpeg

0391868F-6EBD-4FCE-9B51-23207F59F5F8.jpeg

0B818CFD-EC0D-48CC-A341-04A1D4EFB7F3.jpeg

488157B7-6AA7-45AE-B940-F570F573DE77.jpeg

9F1BFBFF-69DF-4307-91EC-39509DC9A1BA.jpeg

7BDD0D0C-3500-48A6-A363-703BCB1C02F9.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been down in Florida  visiting my in laws and son since Friday the 22nd. I applied another coat of varnish to the wheels on Thursday just before we left so when I get home they should nice and hard, ready for another sanding with 320 , then another coat of varnish. I don’t vacation well as not doing things in my normal routine for this time of year is driving me crazy. When I get back home to the 10 degree weather, it will be nose to the grind stone to get my customers 31’ assembled and shipped out back to him. I will still need to finish the Olds wheels at the same time as I need to get them done, tires mounted, and on the chassis. Then, I can finally install the engine/transmission along with the drive shaft to complete the drivetrain. My painter has already painted my bumper irons and radiator shutters so I can mount my nice chrome bumpers on the irons and then mount them to the chassis. I will be able to assemble the shutters, radiator and chromed shell back together and mount that to the chassis along with all the new hoses and clamps. The chassis and drivetrain will then be basically finished waiting to be mated with the body.  More coming soon. Happy new year everyone.

Edited by chistech (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trying to get back into the old car swing this week after getting home from FL this past Tuesday. Was a pallbearer for my last living uncle on my dads side on Wednesday which hit me a little hard as my dad's side is all gone now. Then we got hit with a pretty strong NorEaster dropping some heavy rain here along the coast before changing to heavy, wet snow. When it stopped snowing we had about 10-12" where I live and areas with close to 2' around me. Now we're dealing with sub zero wind chills and tomorrow will bring zero temps before the wind chill figured in. Right now the wind is blowing 25-35mph and my baseboard heat is having a hard time getting the upstairs to warm up much. 

    Finally got back out in the garage today after picking up more parts for the 31 Chevy I'm working for a customer. When I first got the Olds, I asked my wife if she wanted me to put a heater in it. She told me not to bother as it was a convertible and we'd only be driving it around in good weather with the roof down. With her telling me that, I decided to button up all the previous cut outs that had been put in the firewall through the years for previous heaters. It looked like two different heaters had been used through the years. There is also a tap for a heater line on the rear of the water pump housing that I didn't really mess with trying to remove the pipe plug thinking there was no need. On the drive down to FL, my wife asked me if I was putting heat in the Olds! When I mentioned that we had that discussion earlier, she said that she did remember and what the hell she was thinking. So yup, you guessed it. I'll be putting a heater in the car. To put heat in the Olds, a special fitting is required to replace the 5/8 x 18 fitting in the side of the head for the temperature gauge probe. Today while looking for some fasteners for my customer's 31 Chevy, I found that special fitting in a box! At least I don't have to search for one now. I also have a NOS shut off valve to go inline to the heater hose. Now I might have to mess with that pipe plug in the pump housing. My good friend is sending me his spare lower radiator pipe which has a heater hose tap welding into it so I might end up not having to risk trying to remove that plug from the pump housing. I posted a couple pictures from a AACA member on this forum who has a 32' Olds and was gracious enough to send me some pictures of how his heater is plumbed. You can see the special fitting with valve and the temperature gauge probe mounted on the side of the engine head and the tap at the rear of the pump housing. 

       When I got home I checked on the wheels downstairs and found them nice and dry with a good hard, shiny finish. I'm going to try and get them sanded down with 320 and get another good heavier coat of varnish on them. The past coats have been applied very thin and light because they weren't drying. Now with the wheels sealed and completely dry with no tackiness, it's time to apply some thicker coats.

6zJC2ZAHuRaIXn8Sz636AL4D9gPan7wBcNqHDy0T0ifEMTjyOiDS7mjJcv90Zld7ZOrf0fkgO-cblc2wdL35f-sW8ngsWQjmdn8zsqClK-30gsy-bSZUNnzkTRx_YoEajFnSxv6FC9Ex2u9Petm4q0qrXYXyuyGcsAk1zFFb5QfrB2Vuv45SkSniECYZUbBxZ021wE2Gu6DrTZFVApC-jnGiTKSZp67uMDX3hG43ErTXkXEPmoevIFtMqkCkKTlqTnTWtegMNgEcsId69_Ld-UEhEj087CNAitdg4N5xbVEPo7wz3QA5H1i4XumWwigRvCbip9Q4iZ6-M7PQ7fSBAvpm8GZxoCj4Vp4fyYuHopzbAszrHfeKl3zILb7xvgSqDpI4bmGjgVJoifIqIrzpLzikNubIgcAcsCaaztMkFpRsTSe9BiP4EsXgDC7MGTDPON08uG1zkBGNbom3iFtmaAvXa_IfcPGGk29lnvZD6cmMAU0pJAXCOSdZBCwPeegsJdCtXMm6rX5Np6EBmgl7onKt7mRca1fZxhgMqWE4awbrxMmW8SYK-UkDsImqyo8ZOB31HSt9d-ac3aMOYKVAUAs9MB7R4S9eZoorhzZlztUUqK-5ojJgxv1P_UjpYI-4KneAzXHjFKd18t4Fv9Bq1fc82F1X42gR=w1180-h885-no

vgc-n-Vf08QZ1535myk6OD8WuWbQ5iUjyBqj_g1k6NUJPyU3mSXNtq5_wu9K55zy5L4cn6TZCSx1P4qhUIlSx13t9bIlrXciIrFJDYBvBTZeWk-yYpQ0b9DlknNJpi7zt1Ot7EddfFBPraURl0h4030iMk1ts-bAX7muUw8O4mZxbKOzfdpADWQPH6G43BiMfLvuzVrUx4a4KRXt5pgfWJ2uYnfGgumKK0I1545US8rFRNtFwKZzwX7h74GjiYEutrGidD6hUeSIO7-f3vghR0ug37t-v3qzoKtyRhZxBiryAK0jwd_p9ebzVz_2IP2bdupe1T6d5ATlUNHb85HDi18xRH2pFhysj8N5TY4k77BNJLWAR4dVtC2MFR9-KQZ5koTFhUtUcFNC_K_9fbsvoPRS02giydYEQshe8f47D_A2JWjHy1sZ7lb9zDldJtYaVW0vMTZx2bJ36xAvOrySj7fgGb9d4tP34K8AjRYSJ1qsAK4INSPUAtMW0usBjThIFcSpEaemzB2uAy28vg3EX2OCdxiCBKEBkWsYA9hrKxDGvouXrF66TnP3Wjyp7xY77HUw1tQMs68hmL7HCeSurhQVKi-ibo7T6n5L0WfsTu-QgkETR6ezL8mHFr9CpCdaOybNHQQubVF-ACwN12y5vgi9DFjw7at0=w1180-h885-no

PAIcJtDb_giPzM7deE95D2vM1F6JUnVfn_0UnDMVAXtJZbFudWcBggHgTpH9_xBcHqH_juqGC3qGXRdmiq6SGdojVZe9cqaBEGXBdj0zR0iRGhjG2GoU-6gkzHeAPDwmpTNSiPIWwBoYehOsHBgRVd508vT8fWtAaI5kuq3WxPwSb5l41eCpEpYGROTDk4DzJMoC1TG3jJTt2TDEusIhnkid_ae8lxGaSc2FaaoH5Erv9ugE-Pn_IkctpChK_gJADk3WEN_KCuv870uzFU-SzOxYAlGGLCcjUi-36INh-kopWQ88koIy22vAcyVZ8W0hffxfdY8SWaPtMONMPBQ7GFeeAdXih4WYiLOJQHEPa-sKaMMzybGgRSma9mNDTp1cUPjHOFbiSJUPZ2xCJTTD9t2LXQZ1DcLzpUI_X_YGQ4DTYqoj9-fj8ORr0z9BnGHVFP5U9cD1dSaJOKYCY9uwBKL_CdqnLS6q4A9uW9QGCJebsKaqlx9lvsf-fNZ_gCudvpcB89GJ3TKBD0zNjsUy3Fo5B9Tri8OEJiADHYdd3O4RYHFFGyijBl5KdF4pqOPTxZpzrYT8VXFEuUN61aPelb55aVfgr73-Op398Ui17AkxpYNiCLscRWSc6glTiwb4hNSykHrJIUsXYQ0E6MMBgjtf3Zc7MFkZ=w1180-h885-no

TvNOCAaniHET76SRjRXbHTTHD4v9J9scRPajrKnS7-m7xnfAhwm2rkzPWBrvVqF7CX5l-o7V2eSmg0tTZef19hmWtDbWCW9S4fgKbF-jVddiyYUfTPwDLfYaa3SMJnGbNjTLsqMw_bImDUUZkKAdiihyXbYfY54JSN2RHkdZ18PhttSqoaqrQYCrrpW2QeyH0agA_1d5Zn8eaGMiPARcyq1LQGuAjrajfFrbCg1Ke6vMNSHIhAKlkVInIj1uRjuc22A4knZ8IN7AuYXNMuKKGkB5NoE4SRXztcKAW28ltdIP2-OsCT8qLiFpbK00Pfg4VcL2HO2vPFqxfkOgHpoSVvxEQwaVhInreQ-jWC5gYUeg8oL3bYydMUt9YISvVWB4ielPCeK91Ff4Pdx6sDW4HB5KhiIG_CyoSt53VHlQeT-54ZiBgM6snuehEPwGH3IYns9_FL7MRF5qHldxV30tl3dReP5frNdW4SWHlEWfepdEr72hQ9MIWMVJOyeZP9VlW0QXGgDxtzmtVb9u1_W6kY53nz1n0ofEb2o2ZimlLTz4EARufP1JtAAKVY_FOetjz1GGOi9AtNmkAzrUBXOg5AgdzTKUbeItkfX90EGldeHOb2ev_-nP70HwlV0XUd-jp027pQ75CUoagsuEoXJilKgqtP2Ckwzd=w1180-h885-no

 

IMG_0987.jpg

IMG_0990.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cable ties make things look neat and tidy, but what would have been used by the factory?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will usually use soft mechanics safety wire and a pair of safety wire twisting pliers much like what was done on the same era aircraft and even on some of the bolts in this Olds transmission. I suppose that wire was the predecessor of today’s locktite and cable ties. I’ll have to see once I get to that point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I was able to purchase a very nice 1932 Harrison heater from a fellow VCCA member. It appears to be NOS and he believes it was never mounted in a car. Harrison made all the heaters for GM and while they put the Chevy Bowtie on the first branded heater offered for Chevrolet in 1931-32, all other GM cars that got a heater in 32' got a generic "Harrison" labeled one. It is the exact heater I needed to be correct in my 32' Olds DCR. Now my wife can have her heat and I'm happy with that heat coming from an OEM offered heater.

20180110_164139.jpg

20180110_164216.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was discussed in other places on the AACA forums, just how far some of us will go to try and get our cars as correct as we can.  Sometimes I'll admit I let some stuff bother me that most would think is crazy to fret over. This is how anal I've gotten on my Olds restoration. Well, it's not just me who's this crazy, but my good friend Joe Pirrone of CO, who is also restoring a 32' Olds Rumble Seat Coupe, is just as bad. Joe and I have been working on a project together. A rubber grommet that holds the special muffler hanger bracket. The bracket has two of these grommets. The grommets hold a hexagon shaped flanged nut retainer that is offset in the hole so a standard grommet cannot be used. Now, no one will ever see them and most don't even know about them. I didn't really know how the grommet was made because mine was worn out but Joe had one that was almost intact. Joe is a retired engineer so he drew up drawings of how the mold needed to be machined and I made up the molds on my vertical miller. I will be mailing the molds to Joe and he will cast them up out of rubber. Yup, he and I are that crazy that we'll go to this extent for a couple of exhaust hanger grommets that no one will ever see. BUT, they will be correct and we'll know that they are correct. Joe's drawings are PDF's and I can't post them. I'll try and find a way to add them later so people can understand the construction of these grommets. The first picture below shows the muffler hanger bracket with a couple of standard, generic grommets installed that I was originally going to use but will not be using now. The second picture shows the mold for the  special grommet (2 cavities on the right, one with the bolt head in it) and the sandwiching washer cavity (on the left of the mold) that will also have a bolt head in it so that the hexagon will be in the sandwiching washer. The special flanged nut retainer is sitting on top of the mold. A 5/16 x 18 nut is held in this and the hanger is held in place by two fillister screws through the frame crossmember, through the grommet/hanger bracket, and into the nut in the retainer.

IMG_20171220_195001551.jpg

IMG_20180109_220924859.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, chistech said:

how far some of us will go to try and get our cars as correct as we can. 

That is one of the reasons some of us like your thread. We see things as they should be. And you are not the only one attempting to be accurate: I, for example, am messing with snouted grommets as fitted to the Dodge 8, at the moment. I have made drawings and am awaiting 3D prints of them for "prototyping", i.e. do they look right?

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finished up the grommet and washer molds today. Turned the shoulders off the bottom of the heads on five 7/16 bolts so the hexagon sides would mate up flush against the mold surface and fastened the bolts into the molds with nuts. Shipping them out tomorrow to my friend so he can start casting them up.

BD4CCFCC-CF14-4E4F-9C57-60EE1DBD082A.jpeg

87AACC8F-6997-423A-B155-11A932A7E65F.jpeg

9CCE26C1-54CC-4CF5-BD10-CD4DBCBA6AA2.jpeg

739D1DD7-51A3-48A4-8FCD-941E4F6E91D1.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was able to fit in another sanding and coating of varnish on my wheels. Varnish is now drying quickly and I will now sand them down with a red pad (400 grit) for the next coat. The molds got out to my friend and he cast up some grommets. Need to tweak the mold slightly but overall, the grommets are coming out good. Going to work on another mold for the bumper to bumper iron rubber buffer pad. We could easily use a flat rubber pad or rubber washer but again, we're trying to make the part as delivered. Going to try machining up a four piece mold to make this pad. KaFv1SBSr7Croxvmuu2V_CrlE7XtXXFp3etwz9RuGgMSgg7ZIb7Mdgy7zHxTjwn5KU7MvQaQl9KZOeTLiEogFMeHBBcHlr_JyJhMrKS-HTIOX_lI5ivWBsX_5S9Ye7u7IPhtfKZ2zSPE5nQoRcAJElmGqCvDSy9lBHCpDVvqqeXyKFnB7Y7kLQCFm0iuOzDL_GVOzYdXl9PPx7mvy_2RP1t1wUIcsTvELgZ1l7-lLwnK8fWVlpST8eNIPcJjDkvPL9l2fqoYkRnA28Of1eqKRQRBA6uUCr8PGSPd-KZ8iImwVsKkGrHib8XMAxplXqw_QiU7H5khkMYb-8qMnCMKacQeZpP1Embppph6G-kdvrXlluSHCYG2HPOIz4yzsNN64LAI5aKntyB3caEdhmmUIAt_8shLcA8iF2mEan_VbZrls_KM7QaKWgjOaRd8-YAKNsdm-NXnLHdUfINS_xGYTRal0AlBD0VVGgzP4atD3PL3PXhi4Yj9MPOGn2jywUrCzPa2ZRGs5WvYsBwSyZ5MS07s7fn6JRjIoSEJUmC9ZioX12B7gau-RupKRbI8F5aXFE9MXO-llV2ubRNs900RlgCtVTm7lyQ3FuTQG452BefsHpR1hOcAvTVh_oqjYQQkcHg21Z5KcWy85Y80pyq1mSZ87KkPH1RT=w1181-h886-no

ta73WQvu5IEsvvadYiLhd5QtlNS5Ksyl26nhYLQra8P8eap1lyQOQdfWvTjUayHyyyjEFK26tVKZ5aKAQKPSSF8r_n38TrwN22JQI7P-BL-qlRYnRd_3ikokz-s9f8gDIgFtoz7hUQSwGii5jjKb--WWstne0BR-2p-q5bxWFHA2l3iDNT7u1GAJTeNpc6Dz6xeFaLQDWwu1V3Qb4LWfHHBCU-oebPopeeKmFwert9U6NTAaJmlX2dw3cJBlCVT07YQO6uGcWDIGUD3BLa77UTc6xnuyTvPIMyQntxdfBIYNbBVxN6Bs7fVAuc1YSJEYK9PJX5yxMg_z41SbUkvM3u4it1L11q_xEMJg6sQwizqfV0rExHwjnw-uN8xnh4GFaLTsE4CYfBn9jG3XYw4BEdHnQHD8DmxhyPSLoFPllByBd0nKRVw45D9GINpiF1Ks7M8n5vh7GoDBXzUMH-HjBcoCxYe0E7CHXulzfQJqlXEIeecjCyUIe46kgBZmKQ5tUfeRsTzy8u0t3FKV_0EX0txSklTAwGvJygGxA7WpPw5A4Hol5gYaDZSjlTdYUa4N3aGiTlCb0dpe-svISeh4z7uLiucAb_dn2c8JVxkJ0iJwYABy1K2w5sePkwERVFm6_WdnXgjU9u5jMjDUEcmmWJWDqxzAAeQr=w1181-h886-no

SYIJR0dqUfKWi-zBCm3dJhUtr48B6WpluyBID8GAc6_TRJIf3QO9TicW6m85HIS0ZaJHR9Q28LkdleAmPGGBuLl12esVi7BqWthNHEBId-RL6eZ6vGFksGRFV-lZOMyrhU4D6v_FwtFe57m1v9dywBXYZu6tpmraLZ0AXcGcA0m9klMuHLwTamwMMXwJngkDoYIvdhlY2_zPDPDx8r7R-JQOKkIbovpORjI_2Db6exHKSPWg7Ioxl2zyimsdL41PtouUKuk-0A2BbOkbsqFyfS8PtW3-0uTs9wiGaQsIafhHqV1DFRCOYe3lsotXval1OCfm9r51Ar-rKcpKgbCw89o9WRrxWuSyjDxaia3tZySSOxAy2scRnKFi5OA4HxiSxUJYuuh5Iu3SA7wiQK7sSOM-Y_lOF9uJ4UTDLbEJsrl-TMGV3EZTFF88oOcFJ4yTV06a4ElSM5TWaxJgxzPbG8wCguoRDjveAhrRj2bM8Do1Nk0RLkO1DGAljEPOiNaFKxRikrXL4iemQIqWhP6TKURLRXaQayBx00EKjVqSh6fOefEXTQzhEMmzw1g55L29hL95OMOl-Y-7vNIh9abtJZ9dIZXAAHZx3tDdLc1OibB2NXlEuWj4Iy9WmOpbsPRZV0qW1BvE6wc7ySNgBEtifR03Byp4SNpT=w1181-h886-no

6rO1VrCtazOpy12r-Kdl3f7N7I05V_S9zZXJnStjsmoMdFZ7_N7PVQ4ep-dFJLzTXzvJBE8C9cx9l14DNapAWRGblRRLLzmC52rFn1qMZAEzgqRf2Fac6zOeOt7y8jpRxPHyBhiiEi7Qqj9K1SNRi9f92SAVfQDvTVYUKNwNVx3ftvXNNJhjGrFOcCxHBPVQ8aB9uF_oAPoa04d9_iMX2_wbL4vIWUKj29DqQ0ld-E6V6H0nibBVVJw94dC1Hst7Mh6rIFELc-7uwnJijLmrt70paic_5t8fDhWf3nM7aDTdiz70akFCQNl_V4K1hMs_JTjay0TwvbVyP9Iv5B3oXkDwGcGry961N1KaicYbLOw6NIUj6TcMTjsQcJrbyrfEuJqKMZ80vNC2vYyuP5CqDnRDKwmH17GIAXZngch3d28v-6IacajkUoWMn2FPnVDtR6ucGfZzDX0fp9AtFc-v2coEAVJx8LIvlVpd_EUMz2HwMJFkQ7q3MeALdLI_3dzroGE1ZkOf3KTnKHYNpdRPVCbn4qSvhwlZQIqDK-MfIDpSR8j3Yk55jBj-aIc1kefpcR5WpCYLdxVb_eIx8thQGAKoPodHrzsRBBtuk9KMgamn7IQd-uCo4n3pT8B0qveFD5fpddlQb3xiyflJ-etkkUX_A6DR20bE=w1181-h886-no

a4wnjLkPVVnO6im4Ggxsk5CdqlcSsGw0zn1c-3Qyf_z8CdP6gwInaMVHFWf9yn744FjJ9jpTgR-dQFMsNVEBCpZGjmYnKbTQn1ctMEjBeoVLQUpnZ1gKaY48bpM2DO53y6R9xj3Og0WGGo7k6c9BgAOOBnqR8glShCIGngnBBSD5Eg52VJ1O17Rki4jnoTuk9n3YG0dQY_W6CarGx-y5XNRZrxdj93lPqbB0L8JdWZoZ7DcWxAVQve-15OdRSdo_jKz_NqPerDp_tPHCzHfol9Er7DcTmXpnpB3xFV-6-SAKAEjAGQx01OYkUnQcxBlAn2yJzvJLFCR5VxUO1t_jwP-eSC5IN9xusaFbOT2HAqvkG2YoeQfi-3yY0j2Il_VwiV8pkI8uGXfTW0jwFqCDahuJBr-v8Wo6QLVfzkGgZPd_oMRnyiqRqiYQxnAfKGOvUyoRmi7W1ipnddNDp7zqI9FLPWInZS33yhH2XwPG9nQlBDjDwSWG-zdFvHtEgeGEfC2XnIVmofY_WDjac_1ad62kQtwGo_a3JL5aoJXHbzGIZTMgPilLz927-5QIQrHzCwZE4nBDRC7Izrx-k19-m5NCgwkUF85vYLUToiS_Me-UxJ1KJB385BVx1px5XmCsScqni4TZuuG6ZWJbVm_oBfLZ8AOUkaam=w1181-h886-no

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wheels got red padded and another coat of varnish tonight. They are looking so good. The look of the spokes is much like a fine gun stock in the wrist area. The old school varnish just makes them look beautiful. Happy I went this route. Started painting and masking off the hubcaps. As if sanding and varnishing the spokes isn’t tedious enough. Painting these damn hubcaps is no walk in the park either. With an artist brush on the emblem area, Rustoleum gloss black was applied by dabbing on as strokes just smear the paint on the smooth chrome surface. I originally tried masking off the circle of the center emblem but found my fine line tape leaving adhesive residue. I realized I could cut the circle in easily with the brush so painting the center emblem is kind of easy. The1/8” wide groove around the perimeter edge of the top of the cap has proven to be a big pain. I decided to mask off the lower perimeter and paint that. From inside the cap, I measured the diameter of the edge of the area needing painting as 7”. I set my protractor to 3.5” and on wide painters tape, I drew semi circles then cut those out with the xacto knife. Once cut, i removed the curved tape sections and applied them to the hubcap. By doing it this way you don’t have the issue of trying to curve masking tape.(which we all know doesn’t work all that well). I use a popsicle stick to stage the tape edges down to prevent bleed under. The large area was sprayed with Rustoleum gloss black. The below pictures are self explanatory. A few down, a few to go, but getting there.

F13CD506-29E1-4B2A-87AE-8675BFC944DA.jpeg

D7F99B46-D580-4471-87A3-1ED68BD34C28.jpeg

6BFC15FE-CB10-4AA8-A1D9-CF21E9992847.jpeg

ABF7586B-486E-4E3A-82E3-86A1D4435E84.jpeg

93C9FD0C-8CA8-4292-96E4-06DE29E5F4D8.jpeg

CD7088AF-F067-42AB-BB5F-5D0F33FD3536.jpeg

67A3C27A-715F-43AC-9D3C-A5E688778FCB.jpeg

0340E63A-DA0B-4E1F-A5E1-8C26BF4BFEFC.jpeg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That timber is looking good now, it is a lovely hue. Definitely worth all your hard work.

Matthew

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, falconriley said:

That timber is looking good now, it is a lovely hue. Definitely worth all your hard work.

Matthew

Thanks Matthew,

I've got one more coat to go. I'm going to post some more pictures tomorrow of the wheels with painted hubcaps in place. The completed wheels/hubcaps will really highlight the car when they're done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/19/2017 at 8:49 PM, chistech said:

Ok, have to admit, I didn't sleep to well last night. I worked on the Olds last night and decided to put the doors on. OH NO! The passenger side wasn't too bad but the driver's side had a huge gap. The driver's door was kind of lined up with the lines of the car but was gapped about 5/8" and the passenger door, though closer gapped, dragged on the sill! It was late and decided to call it quits for the night. The whole time in bed instead of sleeping, I kept thinking I made something wrong. I tried to get it out of my mind and sleep but couldn't. When I woke at 6am, I immediately started thinking about it again. Lying in bed I decided I would call Jim Rodman of Autowood or Bill Cartwright of KC Wood and ask them what the width of the pillar mortises in the sills should be. I decided I'd probably have a better chance of reaching Bill than Jim so I tried and Bill answered. When I told him my dilemma and told him I copied my originals, he said the originals have to be right and there is slop in the mortises for fudging the assembly when needed. He urged me to move the pillars to the insides of the mortises and check the door gaps then.

 

Looking at the mortises in the main sills, the front hinge pillars have a lot of room to move (about a 1/4"). The latch pillars, because I rebuilt the framework piece by piece, ended up being as far forward in the pillar mortises as they could. The latch pillar mortises do not have the gap or extra width that the hinge pillars have. Getting into it deeper today, I first took the doors off and tried to avoid thinking about the gaps by working the latch pillars themselves. I worked them in areas with a hand chisel that showed contact with the pillar covers. I also found the pillars were a little too low in the sill. Luckily I never tried to screw them in or attach the metal support brackets until I could line up the body skin with the latch pillar covers. How I lined up the body skin was by the original nailing holes that go through the corners of the latch covers and through the covered corners of the body skin where it wraps around the edges of the latch pillars. Turns out the passenger side was a 1/4" low and the driver's side about 1/8 to 3/16" low. It took a bottle jack under the belt rail end where it's bolted to the back of the latch pillar and a few pumps to get the wood up where it belonged. All this fresh wood and tight joints make for a pretty sturdy frame not easily moved if needed. Of course moving all this caused the upper corner of the golf bag door to stick out some (which probably was because I had made one new piece of the outer framework around the opening and hadn't had the body skin on since.) Once the body skin was in it's proper location, the bottom of the latch pillars were screwed into the mail sill with just one screw because of the body skin covers one half of the lower part of the pillar. When the skin comes back off, the bottom of the pillar will get fully screwed in. I will also install the metal pillar supports to shore all the pillars up before the sheet metal all comes back off.

 

Back to the door gaps: With the car all set from the latch pillars back, I decided to pull the cowl and move the hinge pillars to the back of the mortises to lessen the threshold measurement..I am using the original hinge pillars with driver's side being repaired just slightly so the metal support brackets were screwed to the pillars to get the correct height right back in the original holes. I know this had to be right! I then made up shims to tightly fill any gap in the mortises for the hinge pillars. I put glue on the shims and tapped them into place firmly putting the face of the hinge pillars to the rearmost part of the mortise. I then realized the best way to measure this gap is to put the metal rocker cover in place and low and behold, it just fit with the ends almost touching the pillars. OK, I know the opening has to be right now. I then used a big square to check the pillars and they are square to the sill. I had previously checked the latch pillars and they too are perfectly square to the sill. I also checked the face of the parcel tray to the inside of the belt line wood to where it connects to the latch pillar. I was amazed to find this whole assemble perfectly square and I hadn't checked it during assembly. What the hell was I thinking! I should have for sure. Wood working 101!

 

With the shims and support brackets in place, the bottoms of the hinge pillars were screwed in place into the sill. I then started to put the cowl back on. I can tell you it's a chore to get the cowl over the wood when the edges have been bent over as they were originally straight when the cowl was first put in place 85yrs ago. With the cowl back on and massaged over the wood frame and pillars, I was able to get all the edges in place on the pillars and at the bottom of the sills where the metal gets nailed. I then bolted the cowl to the sill with the metal cowl support brackets and put in all original fasteners to make sure the cowl was exactly where it should be. My brother had come over with a hydraulic pump coupling that had a seized set screw in it so I could bore it out on the vertical miller and re-tap it, so when we were done with that, he helped me hang the doors again. Well, I CAN SLEEP AGAIN! Yup, the doors are fitting much better. The passenger door is still too far forward because years ago the hinges were slightly bent moving the door closer to the cowl and closing the door gap to the point that it hits the metal. Probably an old fix to a sagging door way back. The driver's doors is also a little far forward but not much and is pretty good. The bottoms of the doors line up well with a quick 1/8" shim on the passenger side to line up the lines of the body.

 

THANKS GOD THAT'S BEEN FIXED! Now the doors will need some wood and metal work but nothing too much. Time to move on.

IMG_0264.jpg

IMG_0265.jpg

IMG_0266.jpg

IMG_0267.jpg

IMG_0268.jpg

IMG_0269.jpg

IMG_0270.jpg

IMG_0272.jpg

IMG_0271.jpg

IMG_0273.jpg

IMG_0275.jpg

nice work !! never give up -kyle

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back into the craziness. My fellow Olds enthusiast friend Joe and I were discussing the bumper iron to chrome bumper rubber pads on our cars. When I got my car, there was 3 bumpers mounted to their respective irons. All three had the same specific shaped pad while joe’s had a more generic shaped pair of pads. After comparing what we had, we agreed that my pads were most likely the factory correct specimens. So joe says, “ if I draw up a mold design, and you machine it out, I’ll cast some up for us. We’ll be the only guys with the correct ones in brand new condition “. So I got to work on milling up the mold and got it finished tonight. I’ll be sending it to joe tomorrow. It is a three piece mold with two sides and a base that gets filled from the open side. There is a center pin pressed into one side of the mold that will form the hole for the center bolt. Both ends of the mold got slots machined in to aid in open the mold after curing. Of course, no one will see much of these pads, only the top curved part between the iron and the bumper but it will be correct and not just a flat piece of rubber which could be used. So what will be seen will be 100% correct and that makes us two nuts happy!

 

While it wasn’t my best machine work (cutting 2 1/2” deep produced a loosened tool bit and some chatter), the result is fully serviceable and any tooling marks will not be seen when the pad is installed.

66743B2C-7160-4355-B401-9BB8DD3209F3.jpeg

586A93EB-B522-4467-BBF1-6AF61AC8E97F.jpeg

369CF144-32EC-473E-8E16-DD83F320A294.jpeg

183F5FB0-C6CE-44CA-815F-624F02B832C0.jpeg

4161B153-C8AB-440E-80CE-6607EE0B5FA6.jpeg

0651CBFB-91E5-48F1-9B36-D8BC2FE9494B.jpeg

DE9AB495-A403-4641-BEB9-86B24DB3FEE2.jpeg

1A502C59-5C0D-4DBE-ACC9-94E8E6965C8B.jpeg

58DA8D8D-C57D-4E5F-BE04-78EFC2C9D973.jpeg

88B01076-34A7-4296-8496-783996ECF009.jpeg

46AC3BA0-3723-4A75-AB5A-B676E41C9DB3.jpeg

Edited by chistech (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Started putting detail things together for my convertible roof. Found out I’m missing the T bolt escutcheons and will need to make some up. Getting all the gaskets purchased and have determined the Olds had some little features on the roof that the Chevy cabriolet didn’t have. The Olds used a rubber anti-rattle wedge at the bottom of the mid bow near the hinge and there is also a metal reinforced gasket on the end of the mid bow at the hinge line that seals the bottom of the bow to the car when the roof is up. I will be making molds for both items and joe will be casting them up. The T bolt escutcheons in the pictures belong to a friend. He took pictures for me so I can duplicate them.

C51BC021-F1E5-4B51-99EB-C93000A495B7.jpeg

31B2E123-DB8C-4D4D-A09E-8DE47D2D9E15.jpeg

15A45AD8-B17D-45F8-A938-F18360BC54EC.jpeg

8B4E83F3-9192-426B-9E22-90BD21109AD5.jpeg

9E80DE8A-8D11-46F8-941E-5051A99099EF.jpeg

46C88232-E313-4F63-8298-F0B4D1397A3E.jpeg

DD34EF70-A1F1-43FF-A774-3FB86DF9E97B.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now