chistech

32' Oldsmobile Deluxe Convertible Roadster

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Funny you mention the getting out of the position. Twice last night I shimmied closer to the back of the firewall so I could see the back of the dash better. Ended up getting my shoulders stuck between the emergency brake handle and the passenger hinge pillar. I reached up and all I could feel was the flat windshield. Then I reached outside the car and grabbed the windshield post hinge knob. I was able to pull my self up enough to get my shoulders off the floor and with my stomach muscles, pulled my body back out from underneath the dash. My wife says as I get older I need to concentrate on strengthening my core. Looks like I don’t need any gym time, just more garage time!

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OOOH! 😬

JUST THINKING ABOUT THAT POSITION MAKES MY MUSCLES CRAMP UP... 

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One of the advantages of working on brass cars is that you practically never have to bend yourself into impossible places. The ground clearance is so high you often don't even need jacks. I'm afraid I'm getting old for imitating Gumby...I can get in but then I may not be able to get out.

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Gilly and his brother bob came this morning and really got into sanding and buffing parts. Did both doors and for some reason one door has some crazing or spider webbing look to the paint. Looks like the door will need a repaint of black and clear because additional sanding and buffing did not remove it. The got most the hood panels sanded down and bob started to buff one but he lost a fair amount on time working on that door. At least with the passenger door done, i was able to install all the edge windlace and the door panel. Installed both the window crank and door handle with escutcheons. The ashtray cutout in the interior cardboard of the door panel was off slightly to the cutout in the wood regulator board (which is an exact copy of my originally) so I needed to trim the panel accordingly. I installed the very rare 3 acorn Oldsmobile ashtray and screwed in the outer frame. I have pulled it out and will have my neighbor polish it up for me. What’s really crazy is the etched pattern on the ashtray matches the etched pattern of my reproduction door sills. It’s little things like these we don’t seem to notice much but when we do, we have one of those “Ah Ha” moments. I can’t install the door yet because we are touching up the paint on the passenger side hinge pillar. 

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Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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The other night while playing Gumby and installing my dash board, I couldn’t find a good way of tightening up the 7/8” nut on the back of the free wheeling ferrule. I didn’t like the fact that it would move some while trying to operate the cable even though I won’t ever be using the option. I had no room to operate a full size open end wrench and didn’t have a stubby one to try. Even with a short wrench, with the light switch in the area, it was going to be real hard if not impossible to move a standard type wrench. I took and old flat metal wrench for some old air tool I no longer have and ground the opening up to 7/8”. I then bent the shank at 90d and while it’s not the easiest to use, I was able to tighten the ferrule nut and now the assembly is solid like it should be. As Clint Eastwood says in Heart Break Ridge, “adapt and overcome!😂

 

The free wheeling cable pull is all the way to the left and sits in the bottom recessed edge of the dash under the instrument panel. A PITA to get at!

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Ted, I don't know if you had mentioned this before, what are the production numbers on the Deluxe Convertible Roadster? Thanks, John

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3 hours ago, John S. said:

Ted, I don't know if you had mentioned this before, what are the production numbers on the Deluxe Convertible Roadster? Thanks, John

Hi John,

total production of F32 (6cyl) convertible roadsters was 723. 333 were deluxe wire wheeled versions. 249 were deluxe wood wheeled (my car). The remaining 141 roadsters were single spare (rear mounted) standard models. Those were also wire and wood wheeled with more wire wheeled produced than wood. No standard roadsters are currently known to have survived.

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I just checked in on your progress after not looking at this thread for a while.  WOW is all I can say!  What a fantastic job you are doing, and this thread contains a wealth of information for all of us about tricky and innovative techniques.  The dash and instruments look fabulous!  (Also, I'm getting ready to put in a new front wiring harness on my Buick, so I can really relate to your comments about the bodily contortions required for working under the dash!)

 

Neil

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I tacked the hinge pillar coping in place on the edge of the pillar. This coping gets tucked under the edge of the dash at the top and runs along the pillars edge to the floor. I installed the passenger door and tightened all the mounting hardware up good and tight. I noticed with all screws socked up tight, the door was slightly high at the dovetail so I pulled one piece of lead flashing that I was using as a shim, from the bottom hinge. Tightened everything again and the door was perfect so I adjusted the door check the started to install the passenger side front kick panel. This panel has a whole in it so small thin items can be stored in the space between the panel and the metal cowl side. The problem with this is at the bottom, there is a space between the metal and the main sill edge. It’s easy for smaller item to fall down in this area. I actually found a .32 caliber Iver Johnson revolver in another car in this very same gap. 

   The other problem is through the cutout in the panel, you see the bare metal of the cowl inside. I had gotten a couple spare yards of the same vinyl the interior panels are covered in so I cut a piece and contact cemented the top of it to the inside of the cowl. The bottom got tacked in two places to the main sill, the rear corner glued to the metal pillar to sill brace, and the lower front edge was glued and tucked into the channel that the bottom of the panel board goes into. This should prevent anything that gets put into the cubby hole from sliding down into a never to be found again spot. 

     With the vinyl piece all installed, the kick panel got put in position and tacked along the inside edge of the coping on the hinge pillar about every 2 3/4”. Because the cowl insulation pad fits so snug to the cowl sides, I used a piece of thin plastic cutting board material to help the panel slip in behind the pad edge. The plastic cutting board is the light greenish plastic sheet that can be seen in the picture. I then fit the really nice repopped door sill and screwed it down. I also installed my new sill data plate. I’ll end up taping off the data plate and removing the door sill to protect them until the car is finally done. I’ll be making up a nice paper pattern so I can cut my front floor mat soon. The interior is getting close to finished. The door fits really well sealing good around all edges and along the upper bowdrill covered T rubber.

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Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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Some more pictures of the recent work described in the previous post.

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Meant to post this from last week. My buddy with the machine shop who likes doing parts of my projects with me did some work on my shifter closeout mold. Using the angled cutter I bought, he cut the bevels on the perimeter of the mold after he had milled the inside of center section cutout with a standard 3/4” end mill. The inner radius of the angle cutter matched the outer radius of the 3/4” end mill so that worked perfectly. He then radiused each corner of the ribbed plate I had made up for just light press fit. In this picture the ribbed plate is .100 too high in the mold so the back will be milled off the .100. Then a .125 ball end mill will be run around the whole mold centered on the parting line of the ribbed panel and outer angled part of the mold. The 2 3/8” center hole will be bored in the ribbed plate along with the four .375 holes that will be for the pins to mold in the screw holes. I will be making the pins, the center plug with a .125 ball end groove, and the whole 1/2” thick back of the mold. While the angle is not exact to the original, it will be better than anything available and one would have to get right on the floor up close to even see the difference.

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Outstanding  Ted.  The shot of the interior looks like it came right out  a 1932 Oldsmobile sales brochure. Always enjoy your post. Thanks, as always. John

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This is better than new. Outstanding work.

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The mold is coming along now. The four perimeter holes for the pins to mold the screw holes are in and the center hole has been bored. The center hole is encircled with a round edge but it’s 3/16 rather than the 1/8” around the square perimeter. We made two test samples to determine the height of the 3/16” bead. The shallower one is .050 and the deeper one is .070. We are going with the .050 as it duplicates the original bead better to our liking. Both the 1/8” and 3/16” beads will be set up and done on the CNC mill. 

 

I will I’ll be starting on the very basic bottom half of the mold which is so basic, even a caveman could mill it!

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Well, the caveman got it done today. The thing about a majority of machining is good old math and measuring. It was real easy to make the mold back half just working off of center with 3/16, 1/4, 7/16, and 1/2” end Mills. I used the undersized Mills to make the plunge holes and initial slots then cleaned everything up with the full size tooling needed. Going to clean up the mating face a little with just a red pad, will drill holes, and use alignment pins to mate this half to the other. Now I need to make the four screw plugs out of 3/8” aluminum round stock next. If the machine shop can get to the front half in the beginning of the week, there’s a good chance the mold will be finished by the end of the week so I can send it to joe for some testing.

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Went to the machine shop tonight and watched my buddy finish up his part of the mold. He milled the two beads and drilled the back half of the mold I made for the alignment pins. Now I just need to make up the four screw pins and the center whole plug. I am really amazed how close to the original piece this mold is looking.

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Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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Finished off the mold tonight and will be shipping it out to my buddy joe tomorrow. Made up the four screw pins, the center plug, and four 22ga plates that get molded in to help add rigidity to the plate. I need to bore more holes through the plates so the rubber will hold the steel better and not separate off the steel. The reinforcement plate will be put in right after a bed of rubber is poured into the mold. The taper of the screw pins will hold the metal plate right at the perfect height and then the mold back will be added, then the whole mold filled with rubber. Looking forward to seeing the test pieces and hopefully all this work was worth it.

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Installed the rubber running board onto the metal running board and installed the chrome strip along the edge. Started to fit the board to the drivers side and found the wood I replaced was just a little too thick and was hitting the top of the running board. I had to trim the wood with chisels to narrow the bottom edge enough to clear the board top. Cut and trimmed up a piece of welting and held it in place with double sided tape, then bolted the front of the board to the rear of the fender with six 1/4-20 bolts. I will have to pull the rubber board off later when I bolt the running board down to the two support irons. I’m waiting until I have the rear fenders in place before I drill the holes through the boards. Because my boards were restored with repopped bottoms, they have no mounting holes and I need to align everything up first before drilling holes.

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Today I went to my moms garage and picked up my two spare wheels/tires and the drivers side hubcaps. Today’s antique car tires, size for size, tend to run larger than their earlier predecessors. I was told that the Lester 5.50-6.00 x17 would fit into the fender wheel well without having to partially deflate them. Well today I had the car outside so tried putting them in the wells and sure enough, they fit, and they just fit to the point you couldn’t ask for a better fit. Not too tight where they take paint off and not loose where they move around. The tires really add a lot to the sides of the car. Just wish I could get the rest of the sheet metal finished and installed. Tomorrow I’ll fit the passenger side spare irons to the fender and cowl.

     Still waiting on other sheet metal as we’ve had some contamination problems causing too many fish eyes and we’ve repainted those pieces. Trying to find out what the cause is. I’m running a high end Sharpe desiccant oil separator/dryer system and we can’t find anything obvious as of right now but the problem is giving us way too much rework and putting me behind schedule.

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I had a friend with the same type of fish eye problem. They replaced hoses, compressor, everything they could think of , and they would come back. I know this sounds crazy, but it turned out to be the deodorant he was using, contained silicon.

 

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Many years ago we had the same problem in our bodyshop with the low bake spray booth. Eventually, the paint manufacturer recommended putting, I think it was silicone, into the paint. I have just searched the web to see if I could remember the name. It worked. After this, we cleaned the workshop, spray booth and changed the filters and had no more problems.

 

I found this site that mentions 'stuff' to put in the paint. The site is about wood, where apparently the same problem can occur.

 

https://www.woodshopnews.com/columns-blogs/four-methods-to-prevent-fish-eye

 

 

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3 hours ago, wyankee said:

I had a friend with the same type of fish eye problem. They replaced hoses, compressor, everything they could think of , and they would come back. I know this sounds crazy, but it turned out to be the deodorant he was using, contained silicon.

 

 

Actually it's not crazy at all.

 

When Chrysler started making the "new" mini van here in Windsor , Ontario, Canada I was lucky enough to get the contract to clean the wire reinforced glass walls of the new automated spray paint booths on the body line.

I was given a list of acceptable cleaning agents (which I have forgotten now) and all went well.

However, once under production the paint finishes were experiencing fish eye effects.

Seems it was indeed the under arm spray deodorants and aftershave liquids mixing in the air causing the problems. 

 

I guess our Government banning of those aerosol sprays is doing us a favour once one thinks about it... 

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My Buddy joe call me yesterday and told me the good old US mail worked extra quick for some reason and he got the mold in one day! He sent me pictures of the first test. One small air bubble on the back of the lip which wouldn’t be seen anyway but all I can say is it totally blew me away when I saw it this morning. All the careful machining work payed off. We’re the only ones presently reproducing this part. Joe is going to try adding the metal stiffener when he gets back home from a trip. Pictures of the original and our freshly molded urethane one.

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