chistech

32' Oldsmobile Deluxe Convertible Roadster

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11 hours ago, Taylormade said:

Don’t kill the messenger, but some of those lines look a bit wavy and not evenly spaced.  I know photographs tend to exaggerate certain features, and perhaps the factory jobs suffered from similar applications, but something doesn’t look right.  Feel free to stone me if you don’t agree.  Not trying to be overly critical, here, but this restoration is as close to perfect as any I have seen.

Nope, no stones. You are both correct. It is not as good as it could be but in all honesty, most will never see it as close up as we can in these pictures, not that it excuses inferior work. My dilemma is my time frame right now. I have two more dashes with this one being my best and the next best has a tiny dent in the bottom rounded edge that I believe we can work out. I am having that chromed and will attempt painting it with my RC plane buddy whom I’ve already talked to about it. He felt we should be able to accomplish the job. He already has 1/64” tape plus the larger tapes needed. He also felt we could use some of the blue Oracal stencil film I used to paint the sprocket patterns on the wheels. I gave him some of that film and he’s used it on model stencils with perfect results including the Dauntless that I posted pictures of here earlier and the pictures show he’s a master of the airbrush. It still comes down to the old saying, “If you want something done right, do it yourself!”

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Not to be overly critical, but there are 100 point cars and there are over the top 100 point cars (and both are great), but a long time ago someone said if not doing an over the top 100 point car that no one will notice tiny imperfections when the car is fully finished - and turns out they actually were correct (especially given my standards are generally higher than most peoples to begin with) - my point is perhaps just be happy with the dash and car is still very capable of winning every award on the globe with the dash  still being more nice than 99.99% of everyone else's.  

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I don’t disagree, but I think the issue is this dash was done by a purportedly top plater.  It’s not top notch work, and Chris tech says they charged top dollar.  Makes me wonder how they did it at the factory.

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On 7/16/2019 at 8:10 AM, chistech said:

Problem is, I don’t think the site will support a video. Another problem is I don’t even know how to put one on YouTube!

 

lol  took me a while to learn how to post on youtube, then link here :)

 

then the google take over, and had to learn it all over again. and if you embed it here, then the lil video window show, and people can click on it to watch.

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My self adhesive bowdrill cloth from Steele Rubber Products came in today. Tonight I put it on the four new T rubbers to what my research on my originals indicated. I used my tablesaw to cut the angles on the ends and the 80T carbide blade did an amazing job giving a perfect cut and not leaving any kerf marks in the rubber. I tried the table saw for the heck of it and it turned out working perfectly. 

     After I cleaned each T extrusion thoroughly with prepsol to remove any dirt or release agents, I let them dry. Once dry, I cut the BD cloth to an inch over length on each end and then peeled back about a 1/2” of paper backing down the whole length. I stuck the BD edge to the molded inletted line on the inside edge of the T rubber and made sure the BD was straight. I then pulled the BD over the tip of the T and started to work the BD down the outside face of the T rubber. I used a plastic window stick used to work glass into rubber to smooth the BD on the rubber as I worked it down to the bottom curve of the outside lower flange. Once this was done, I worked the BD around the bottom outside edge onto the back and the sheet metal strip that’s glued to the back. With a razor the ends were cut and the corners of the BD 45d cut as the originals were. Overall, happy with the results. Need to get a couple of 22ga strips made up for the upper window frames so I can glue on the rubber and finish the job.

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Few more pictures to help explain the process. Very impressed with the Steele BD cloth. Super sticky and easy to work with.

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Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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Looks great, very nice looking !!

 

sure it take a lot of patience and time, but worth all of it in the end for sure

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Sent an email to a friend who works at a local sheet metal shop and asked him if I could get a couple .80 x 25” strips made up. He replied yes and I picked them up late yesterday. I measured out the screw spacing and machined elongated holes like the originals had on my vertical Miller. I cut some T rubber just over length and clamped it between two boards. This keeps the rubber perfectly straight when contact cementing the metal on. Used a couple of car batteries as weight to keep it all under compression until it set. Die cut the holes in the rubber with my brass tubing in a drill, then covered them with the BD cloth. Put the drivers side in place so far and I’m very happy with the fitment.

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Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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15 minutes ago, weathered1 said:

Ted, that looks great. Does that material you covered with come in other colors?

Yes, but only Black and Tan, the two most common convertible roof colors. Steele Rubber sells the black in 2.5” and 5” widths. The tan only in 2.5”. I originally thought it would be somewhat difficult to apply the cloth but was pleasantly surprised how easy it went on. It is expensive but because I didn’t need that much, I opted not to go the bare cloth, spray on adhesive route. Very glad I bought the self adhesive cloth.

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Thought I’d mention a little trick I use to make the holes in the rubber for the screws. With the screw heads being much bigger than the milled slots, it’s normally hard to make the holes centered and good looking. The technique I used is to puncture the rubber through from the bottom with my small ice pick tool. I then use one inch lengths of different sized tubing, increasing size until I get to the size of the screw head. I then use the next size up, but a long piece in my drill. I sharpen the tubing and using the small pieces over the ice pick as a guide, I cut the hole down to the metal strip below. This trick works pretty slick and makes neat holes in the rubber.

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Ted

The quality of your work and attention to detail is so over-the-top impressive.  I love following your progress here.  Thanks for all your meticulous work and for posting your techniques.  

This will be one stunning automobile....  and knowing every single part is restored to such a high degree will bring you years and years of happy motoring.  

Gary

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9 hours ago, chistech said:

Thought I’d mention a little trick I use to make the holes in the rubber for the screws. With the screw heads being much bigger than the milled slots, it’s normally hard to make the holes centered and good looking. The technique I used is to puncture the rubber through from the bottom with my small ice pick tool. I then use one inch lengths of different sized tubing, increasing size until I get to the size of the screw head. I then use the next size up, but a long piece in my drill. I sharpen the tubing and using the small pieces over the ice pick as a guide, I cut the hole down to the metal strip below. This trick works pretty slick and makes neat holes in the rubber.

love it Ted, Ingenuity is what one must have in order to work on any older car. have to see a problem and figure out a way to solve it. 

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I've wondered just how the door window treatment was handled.

 

Dad restored his 1928 Whippet Cabriolet many years ago and since it was pretty rough when he got it he never really knew what to do for the windows. His amateur restoration answer was to contact cement a rubber section onto the top wood bow and the frame/door post.

I haven't moved the car since his passing and when I opened the door today found the glue has let go and the rubber was laying on the seat and floor.

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I would suspect these model cars would use what you have done wouldn't you?

Dad wasn't going for an award winning restoration but I would like to do something to at least keep the windows from rattling while going down the road (someday...)

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Any chance I could hire you to make up a set given some measurements???

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I can gladly help you out. Looking at your pictures it looks like you only need the top and rear edges. Looks like you also have wood you could screw into. The biggest thing is the dimension of the clearance of the window frame to the opening. Need to have at least 3/8” to clear the T rubber. Would definitely need to see some close up pictures of thewindow up and the rear/ top clearance to know. Could probably cut the T into an L shape also if we need to go that way. 

 

Nice car by by the Way!

Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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Thanks Ted.

 

Appreciate your willingness to help knowing your are full steam with your Olds which will be an award winner when it is completed!

 

My Whippet will show well once cleaned up but needs carburetor attention (and a new battery now...) to be on the road again. 

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Not to high jack your thread will send you a PM.

Doug

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Doug, don’t ever worry about hi jacking any thread of mine. I always enjoy seeing other old cars and other projects people are working on. We all learn by others and we learn something new every day. That’s why I enjoy this particular forum so much. Guys like JP and MM keep my technical juices flowing and guys like LC, G, and others keeps the creativity and quality juices satisfied. I spot something in each post I click on that I put in the back of my head knowing I’ll end up referencing it someday when it’s needed. 

    Don’t worry about how involved I am with the Olds. I currently have a 34’ Chevy pickup I’m working on for a customer, a 30’ Chevy coming in for another customer, and I restore things like heaters for people in between all the other stuff. I like helping others when I can and enjoy seeing any old car back on the road. 

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1 hour ago, chistech said:

I always enjoy seeing other old cars and other projects people are working on. We all learn by others and we learn something new every day. That’s why I enjoy this particular forum so much.

 

I agree. It seems a shame that there are not more members of the forum willing to share their old car work and experiences, good and bad. On the other hand; maybe, I would then spend too much time reading the posts and not get any work done on my own restoration! I have only been a member for about a year and have learnt so much from a very friendly and helpful bunch of guys.

 

Writing the posts and taking the photos also helps me. When I choose the photos and write the 'blurb', you tend to notice different things and sometimes it makes you think of better ways to doing the job.

 

Keep up the excellent work you are doing.

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Everyone who post their restorations on this forum is helping so many of us with our projects. The education that you provide for all of us is beyond words. I have been working on cars my whole adult life, and I'm always  picking up tips and ideas that make my work so much easier. Ted, the work on you Oldsmobile always goes to the next level. Thanks. John

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Well I finally received my dash panel today. They ended up keeping it longer and I believe they fixed a couple areas that even they must have not liked. It is very nice and one would have to concentrate to find the not so perfect areas so for now it’s good. I know it will pass any judged show without issue. Installed all my restored gauges and installed the assembly in the car. Put in my restored coil that has the key that matches my door locks. With everything all wired in, I put in the shutter cable, the free wheeling cable, and the speedometer cable. I ended up removing the seat bottom, padding the frame with moving blankets, taking off my shoes, and layer on my back up under the dash with my bare feet up by the rear window. Think I have some toe smudges on the glass now! This is now like the third time I’ve contorted my body like this to get under the dash. I wired up a 6volt, 10 amp relay for my heater so I could use my key switch to kill power to it if I forgot to shut it off. The Olds ignition is in the coil itself and I didn’t want to risk too many amps through the contacts. So now, with the key on, the relay pulls in to close and supply power direct from the battery feed. I put a OEM style metal bayonet fuse holder in the power feed line to the relay so if I put anything else in ( like my Olds radio) I’ll just add it to the relay load side and it too will be fused.

      I’ve had a real aggravated pain in my left side for about a week that almost seems to be bothering my gut. Thought maybe I’d gotten a summer stomach cold but tonight when I went through my under dash gymnastics I realized I think I know what the pains are from. I’m getting too old and too out of shape to twist my body up like Gumby! Now my right side is hurting just like the left. Damn!

 

just thought I’d add: when I sent my gauges out for restoration I opted for the clock to changed to a modern movement. Glad I did as it’s working great and instead of having to turn the knob while reaching way up underneath the crowded dash to set the time, I simply push the same knob in and the arms move quickly to whatever time you need. Just take your finger off the knob and the time is set. Pretty slick.

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Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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lol, know what you mean by feet in the back window... how i did all my wiring and wiper routing under my dash. threw a towel on the seat, and sat in the seat upside down. head on toe board, shoulders on floor, but in seat, legs up and over. 

 

yeah its hard to get in that position and just as hard to get out of it. then your body reminds you  'hey i can NOT do that'

 

but hey, the things we do to get our cars done, and done right :)

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