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32' Oldsmobile Deluxe Convertible Roadster


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5 hours ago, STEVE POLLARD said:

Ted, I'm going nuts going back and forth at those pictures.... all great..... I would probably go with #6.....

 

Steve

 

LOL Steve, that’s why I posted them here. I personally like number 6 and #5 the best. I just hope the judges don’t think that reflection on the fender edge is a blemish.

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Looks nice...as Tony the Tiger would say...."GREAT"!

Did Oldsmobile also build a sister car to the Chevrolet five passenger Cabriolet.  At one time I had a body for one of those 1932 Chevrolets, but let it go to pursue a 1930 LaSalle convt. coupe.  The year 1932 was certainly a great year for anything GM!

Al

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19 minutes ago, alsfarms said:

Looks nice...as Tony the Tiger would say...."GREAT"!

Did Oldsmobile also build a sister car to the Chevrolet five passenger Cabriolet.  At one time I had a body for one of those 1932 Chevrolets, but let it go to pursue a 1930 LaSalle convt. coupe.  The year 1932 was certainly a great year for anything GM!

Al

Al, the 32' Olds, 32' Pontiac, 32' Chevrolet, and 50 series 32' Buick all had a very very similar model. All those models used exactly the same roof, windshield frames, and wiper motors. The parts book confirms the same numbers across the models. The doors, from the top hinge down can be used on them also along with the landau bars. Of course, power plants, transmissions, chassis were all different. This also means the majority of body wood is different but about 15-20% is the same. 32' was definitely the last elegant year for the car in my belief as in 33 the chrome went away for most. One of the most notable things that makes the Olds stand out from the others is it's longer wheelbase which was 7.5" longer than the Chevy. Because Olds offered the straight 8 in 32', the first year for it, they made the wheel base longer and included the 6 cylinder cars in the longer chassis. A simple move of the rear engine crossmember and an indentation on the firewall was all that differed to fit one engine from the other. The Olds also sits higher than the other models and it's stance height reasoning is a mystery to those of us who have tried to figure out why it sits higher than most cars of the period. I can roll under the running boards of my car on my creeper just rubbing my chest. On my Chevy, it's hard to get underneath is when on the ground. 

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I just realized your asking about a 5 passenger cabriolet. Not sure what model you mean but Olds only made one open car in 32' which was the convertible roadster which was not really a roadster but a cabriolet or convertible coupe depending on what you want to call them.

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Thanks for your very good information.  I am certainly a GM guy but didn't know that Olds offered an 8 cylinder in 1932!  Here is a picture of a body style that I referred to above, but not convertable.  This similar body, that I referred to, was a convert, with landau irons and roll up windows.  (Sorry, I couldn't quickly find an exact picture).

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Those were called landau phaetons and Olds didn’t make one in 32’. Their 32 lineup was pretty basic, standard-deluxe 2-4 door sedans, standard-deluxe 5 window coupes, and standard-deluxe convertible roadsters. 1 other was the lavish 4door patrician model which was always in deluxe attire. Few things to note is only the deluxe coupes had rumble seats and golf bag door, 8 cylinder closed cars had two wipers vs. one on the 6 cyl cars, and production numbers were kept even for the wheel options of wood or wire. ( Olds is pretty much the only manufacturer to designate their numbers this way).  An example would be F32  Deluxe Convertible Roadster, wood wheeled, 249 units or F32 deluxe convertible roadster, wire wheeled, 333 units. (F designates 6 cyl, L would designate 8 cyl) deluxe (6 wheeled)  Same exact car other than the wheel option. On other GM cars there’s no way to tell the difference between the wheel options if it was offered that year. 

     1932 was a special year for Olds and one of their worst. They introduced their 8cyl, the first fully automatic choke on both 6&8’s, oil cooler/warmer, and decarbonizer (it was basically a failure). For some reason they felt the need to record it very well. Motors, chassis, and sill data plate also had matching numbers.

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I like 1, 5, and 6

 

will never really get a picture with out any reflections unless you have the perfect conditions and NOTHING around to reflect. that is what you get for doing such a kickass job and paint !! should have went flat /matte black then no worries on reflections. almost need a completely open field nothing overhead, and clear clear skies !!

 

beautiful work and beautiful car Ted.  This is true validation that your hard work, commitment, and dedication to detail truly are worth it and pay off !!

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Ted started this thread in October of 2016 and he refers to "before he got it home this Summer" so I'd guess Summer of 2016 to Fall of 2019. That is fantastically fast by my standards and very well done.

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17 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

Ted started this thread in October of 2016 and he refers to "before he got it home this Summer" so I'd guess Summer of 2016 to Fall of 2019. That is fantastically fast by my standards and very well done.

Thanks for posting that Joe. Just looked at my certificate of title and I put it in my name on 2/12/16 which was in a few days of it being delivered to my mom's garage. I brought the car home end of August and started on the car itself. I worked on a few smaller things prior, like make the tumbler barrel on the golf bag door and made the pieces for the automatic choke before the car ever came home. When you said it was fast, I guess in reality it was pretty quick, but it did really feel like it took forever. Some things just seemed to drag on like we all know they can. Luckily I'm back working on a 34' Chevy pickup because parts are finally coming back from the machine shop and the painter, being done with the Olds, can move on to doing the body work on the pickup. We found a paint shop who is going to paint it because they have a really good setup to paint and the painter doesn't want to contend with any chances of dust or contamination again. I was really starting to miss working on the Olds as it's been an off and on project for those past three years. I miss my time on it like an old friend!

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I am a late comer to your blog about the 32 Olds.  I read back from the start, you have done a very nice job...something to be proud of for sure.!  I have never been on an antique auto project that has moved along as fast as you have on the Olds.  I guess I allow to many other things to interfere with a steady focus.

 

Al

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Used a friends bore scope to look at the top of my radiator core. First two pictures are where it’s the clearest in the middle. The others are from the sides that are really bad with big pieces, chunks, and goop. Sorry about the pictures but they’re pictures of the scope pictures as you can tell. I’m going to get the car somewhat warm again, the drain it. I will connect two long hoses to clear the car to the top and bottom of the radiator then try flushing with the garden hose bottom through the top. Thinking I might also try and make up a soft copper air nozzle and work it into each side, trying to blow some of the debris loose. Then it will go back together and get the evapo-rust treatment. 01309033-A248-4E0B-B444-B99EE7190EB0.jpeg

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Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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There could have been some more scaling break free from the water jacket as we didn’t boil the block out because the main Babbitt was perfect and the machine shop didn’t want to risk damaging it. So it was scraped as clean as possible and blown out. With the reheating of the engine for the first few times, possibly more of it broke free. The sludge is probably some antifreeze combined with some of the head gasket stop leak I used. I also have a feeling that the radiator shop didn’t get it as clean as he thought he did. I bought one of the clear upper radiator hose filters to run it it for a while to monitor everything but i got the wrong size. I need to order the larger one. Of course it won’t be installed when showing but when every day driving, it will be.

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Ted

I am embarrassed to say that I saw your car, and was very excited to see it... but there were so many people around it, that I thought I'd come back thinking I'd have a better chance at getting a good photo. Time got away from me, and I forgot to go back (in addition to having to try and walk the entire field and get photos, I was showing one of those Packards across the aisle from you). I haven't come back to this restoration post in a LONG time, and frankly, I was very surprised to see that you have finished the car. I'm hopeful that we can get together sometime next year at one of the AACA Nationals, so that I can photograph the car for a feature story in the AACA magazine. Please let me know if you plan on showing again, and where. Congratulations on such a beautiful restoration, and on your national award nomination. Good luck.

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Hello West,

so you were an owner of one of those very intimidating classics across the row from me! LOL. That’s all my wife kept saying was “I don’t know Ted, I can’t believe those cars. Ours is just a little Oldsmobile”. Sitting across from Auburn’s, packards, big Chryslers, etc., is pretty intimidating when you’ve never shown before. Now realizing how the judging is run along with the whole event, I would encourage anyone with any type of show worthy vehicle to participate in aaca shows.

 

     My plan is to attend the National show in April at Charlotte speedway in NC to go for my senior award. It would be great to meet and discuss the 32’. I feel it has a good story to tell. From being put in storage in 66’ in a collection of a BOP dealer in upstate NY, most likely a trade in, with me wanting a 30’s RS convertible but finding the one I was interested in sold while I was on vacation, to me being given the phone of the guy who pulled the Olds from storage. There’s a lot more story too. Had someone try to buy the car out from under me when I asked some questions about the car on a club forum. Two people on that forum actively tried to locate the car, contacted the owner, and offered “$500 more than any offer of mine”! The owner showed me the texts then told me he didn’t like people like that and sold me the Olds. The deal was I had to promise him a ride that he hasn’t gotten yet, but he definitely will. Then there’s another story on how two guys living 2000 miles apart, both owning 32’ Olds, one a RS coupe, the other a DCR, became good friends, and worked together, remaking many parts that are not available. I have to say that while the Olds restoration at times pushed me to my limits where I had to walk away for days, it was also a great experience that allowed me to make some great friends along the way!

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12 hours ago, STEVE POLLARD said:

Ted - Have you made a choice of which picture ?

 

 

Steve

I am using #5 as the rear view but went with a picture of the front that I hadn’t posted here. My friend joe who’s shown many cars and won many awards, recommended a different photo that was taken in the classic angle used for most photos. The only thing I don’t like about the photo is the photographers assistant was wearing a turquoise top that reflected in the hood doors. But as many have said, there’s no way to get around all the reflections. Below is the frontal photo I used.

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Wes, Ted's Oldsmobile would make a great article for the AACA magazine. I can't say enough about the Olds , and the great restoration that was peformed by Ted and friends. . Ted maybe tired of my praises, but this '32 deserves any and all coverage that it can get. Truly a wonderful car. Thanks, John

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40 minutes ago, John S. said:

Wes, Ted's Oldsmobile would make a great article for the AACA magazine. I can't say enough about the Olds , and the great restoration that was peformed by Ted and friends. . Ted maybe tired of my praises, but this '32 deserves any and all coverage that it can get. Truly a wonderful car. Thanks, John

I second that !

 

Steve

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As you can see by my post above, I think we're on top of it. The Charlotte locale is not a great place to photograph cars. Ted, do you think you'll be showing at Hershey again? Or, if you obtain your Senior award at Charlotte, you're eligible to show at the Grand Nationals, which is in Allentown Pennsylvania next year. There's also a Spring Nationals in Beckley, W.V., which is before the Grand Nationals as well.

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Yes, it will be going to Hershey regardless of any other place I go prior to October. I hope to attend the NAOC show the first week in June. Not sure if that would interfere with the date of the WV show you mention. We can figure something out.

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Ted, how is the Chevy pick up coming along? Any pictures.? A friend of mine is looking at a 1931 Chevy Victoria  featured in  the December issue of Hemmings  located in South Carolina . Very nice  looking car. John

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Hi John, funny you ask as I’m starting another restoration thread on it tonight. I restored a 31’ 5 passenger coupe (Victoria model in ford lingo). The 34 pickup belongs to the same owner who lives in AZ and CO. The coupe is in AZ and the pickup will be going to Colorado when it’s done. Here’s a picture of the coupe with my 31’ special sedan in front of my house  right after I had finished it. The other picture is of it getting ready to load on the truck to AZ which had just dropped the pickup.

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I requested a copy of my  Hershey score sheet from the AACA so I could correct any issues they might have found. I was surprised and relieved to find there was only two areas they marked. One I knew of, the other I missed. The area I missed was the front suspension being dirty. We just ran out of time to clean the car all up and with me getting the car finished on Tuesday before I left on Wednesday, I just couldn't get it outside to get a good look at it in the natural light. The other area was my fuel tank and it having some dents. The 32' Olds tanks are far and few between and I do have two. One has a paper think bottom with some small dents and the other is solid, but it has a crease and some smaller dents. The later tank is the one that's on the car and while we got some of the smaller dents out, the crease is still present. 

 

Cleaning the front end up is the easy part while getting one of my tanks perfect will require much more work. Getting the tank done right will be the next Olds project. With only these two items listed it appears the car didn't have much in deductions so fixing the tank and just cleaning up the front suspension will get the score close to perfect which will be my goal.

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Didn't you have a bolt head exposed somewhere that had the radial lines indicating a grade 5 bolt and such markings were non-existent in 1932 ??  Hmmm...maybe that was someone else's car. You certainly would have caught that. 😜

 

 

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4 hours ago, Kestrel said:

Didn't you have a bolt head exposed somewhere that had the radial lines indicating a grade 5 bolt and such markings were non-existent in 1932 ??  Hmmm...maybe that was someone else's car. You certainly would have caught that. 😜

 

 

I had a few things I knew of that the judges didn’t mark me down for. I had the four bolts on my luggage rack that had the grade markings and the wrong chrome trim rings on my taillights with the weep hole on the top. When I got back, I immediately changed out the bolts to the originals and put on my NOS Oldsmobile taillight lenses with trim rings. So I fixed those two issues immediately when I got home. 

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When I was at Hershey this year, I ordered a nice car cover for the Olds. It came in last night so I went down and put it on. My moms garage is nice and dry with heat so I just put a nice winter blanket on the girl. My mom loves taking people out to her garage to show them two old cars she’s older than! She was born in 1930 and will be a young 90 in February. Still have to put the cover on the Chevy but I try to drive it right up until they sand and salt for the first time.

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20 hours ago, John S. said:

Tucked in for a long winter's nap. Nice pair of cars Ted.  John

Thanks John. The Chevy is a nice car for sure. It’s a complete frame off with a fresh motor so it goes down the road surprisingly nice. It easily does 50-55 and yes, the brakes are very good, adjusted correctly. It gets compliments every where I take it but because it was painted to preference rather than originality, it wouldn’t score good in either the VCCA air the AACA. The paint combination is a correct 31’ Chevy combination, code 81, but the combination was never available on the closed cars, only the open bodied ones. 

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Thank you John, happy thanksgiving to you and your wife also. The Chevy is just a fun car to drive and I like to drive it a lot so I’m not really worried about showing at all. Matter of fact, my buddy Kestrel, who posted a few post earlier, has a 32’ Chevy special sedan and this past June we went on a nice little 130 mile day trip sometimes hitting around 60+- mph on a section of highway. It’s a great “going out for ice cream car”!

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