chistech

32' Oldsmobile Deluxe Convertible Roadster

Recommended Posts

Thanks Jerry. The Dauntless normally is a great flyer and hopefully this model should fly good too. The biggest thing with a model this size (55” wingspan) is the wing loading or all upweight vs. wing area. I’m pushing this one some as it is a nine channel plane with lots of stuff on board. It has the basic throttle, elevator, rudder, and ailerons but it also has retractable landing gear, flaps, dive brakes, bomb drop, and machine gun sounds/led lights. Normally,  warbird models build nose light so often nose weight needs to be added. I always try to add useful weight like a heavier engine, bigger or double battery packs,etc. Im estimating this Dauntless is going to come in about 8.5-9lbs which will make it fly well but give lots of caution when flying slow and dirty (with flaps deployed). Still got a lot of details to add and I’m starting to put the airframe back together so I can determine the center of gravity. I achieve that normally with battery pack and other internal placements. Sometimes, nothing beats the old lead on the firewall!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your Dauntless is beautiful!  This is probably a terrible thing for you to hear, but have you considered electric power for your RC planes?  Brushless motors and Lithium Polymer batteries have transformed the hobby -- you can build lighter and end up with much lower wing loading.  And you don't have to wipe your model down after flying.  Just a thought.  I have been enjoying this thread on your beautiful Olds, and wish you the best of luck.

 

Neil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Neil, thanks for your info, 

I actually have a few electric aircraft. These days, the only issues I have is with my electric aircraft. Whether a battery going bad or an ESC going out and crashing a P47, the electrics are more problematic for me. I enjoy the sound and smell of glow four strokes. I also enjoy the challenge of installing an IC engine in an airframe. Routing fuel tanks, exhausts, etc., are all things when done right and kept out of sight as much as possible is what it's about. Installing electric motors is real easy and quick but I'm not really into that. The one thing I have to disagree with is the AUW of the electrics. When building warbirds for example, the batteries end up weighing more than a comparable IC setup. Yes, you can paint latex but you can do that with gas engine planes also. I'll be one of those guys who's the last to change but I still don't mind the cost of glow fuel, wiping down a plane as it lets me check over my whole airframe after the day, and hauling around the starting stuff. Another thing I hate is waiting for big battery packs to charge. Even small packs take an average of 30 minutes for about 4-7 minutes of flight time. On my glow planes, as long as my on board battery is  a large MaH one, I can fly, land, refuel, and immediately fly again. Hey, I'm an  old car type guy,  and an old glow fuel RC plane guy! LOL  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meant to post this the other day. While wet sanding down the body to get it ready for paint, we found this in the drivers side rear inner fender well. In most cars these panels rot out right along the bottom where this number was stamped so I’ve never read anywhere of anyone finding one before. You can see it’s close to the bottom of the panel where it bends under the kickup. This area took a beating both from the elements outside and the wood getting wet on the inside. Especially for a roadster, my cars sheet metal was in exceptional condition.

      The number is definitely a 1 32 which I believe to be a date of production code for my body. By my cars serial number I’ve determined it to be a mid to late February production so a body with a January production date seems like it would fit. I keep finding out and learning more on these Olds. It seems these cars were better marked and serialized than most believe them to have been.

1A52A3AD-4014-4B89-B135-788F9E83C555.jpeg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that you found that tid bit of info are you going to stamp it just a little deeper so it shows up even more?  Looking good.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Laughing Coyote said:

Now that you found that tid bit of info are you going to stamp it just a little deeper so it shows up even more?  Looking good.

No, I’ll be leaving it just as it is. The chance I’d be able to find the correct size or font would be hard enough and then if I was just a smidge off, it would look restamped. That would no longer look original. I know it’s there, it shows just enough, and I have pictures now to document it’s there.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Thought I’d post a few more pictures of more work on the Dauntless. Got a picture of the LEDs flashing in the front machine gun barrels. Now some more paint work and a few other mechanical things and it will be done. Should have mentioned that there are no decals on this plane. Everything is cut stencils that are cut in place on the planes surface. Just the right touchis required to cut the stencil paper and not the planes surface. I used this technique on my Olds wheels stencils. I’ve had a lot of practice cutting stencils!

9E4658EE-22CC-42FC-9757-0289A134262C.jpeg

BEA5D1C2-05DE-4EDB-9D3A-9CE57B3805A8.jpeg

8BA312AB-9757-4C44-AD47-D4EC5639B733.jpeg

155FB7FC-86B6-4631-BD35-854D46071896.jpeg

Edited by chistech (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saw these at a miniature museum in San Diego area....

Picture 061.jpg

Picture 062.jpg

Picture 063.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those might have been made by a Japanese dentist. There was a dentist who was famous for constructing exact scale models out of aluminum. Every part was built using factory blueprints. Years of construction in each one. Incredible work.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't want to derail your thread -- although you seem to be doing it by yourself without any help from me!  <grin>   I understand completely what you're saying about the pros and cons of glow power versus electrics.  I started with electrics and have never flown any gas or glow planes, so I probably have a bias in that direction.  But I hate forums where people go on for pages arguing about which is better.  As far as I'm concerned, as long as you're having fun, that's the whole idea.  Another reason I'm probably happier with electrics is that I'm really not a builder -- I did it when I had to back in the days when ARF's were terrible -- but nowadays with CAD laser cut (and even foamie)  ARF's that fly great and require very little assembly, I'm a very happy camper.  I have tremendous admiration for people like you who are true craftsmen and spend hours on their planes and then have the guts to go out and fly them!  Thanks for posting more pics of the Dauntless -- it's very impressive.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went to my moms house today to mount my front fenders. Had to pull the radiator and the shell to make it easier. Found I had to reroute my fuel line at the front passenger side motor mount area. It was hitting the inside edge of the fender so a little bending and maneuvering and I got it all set. My brother and my wife helped out today so I had a couple extra sets of hands. Mounted the headlight bars with headlights and horns. Starting to look like something now. With my 31’ Chevy parked next to my Olds it’s easy to see just how much bigger and grander the Olds will be. 7 1/2” of wheelbase is a big difference.

CFD5E95C-1476-4FAA-A387-AC91201B76F7.jpeg

381AEEDF-79A5-4069-ACCF-C3BB6C30FA50.jpeg

39D5092F-B082-4002-92E2-A5A2C5447FF2.jpeg

64159D42-2AC6-4755-8D3E-D38DAA5F7CA6.jpeg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ted, i was just going to send a text to you ,asking about any new post on the Oldsmobile. It looks spectacular! Thanks for the updates. John

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My time has been at a premium lately as my job is super busy and I’m remodeling my kitchen while I keep putting time in on a 34’ Chevy pickup for a customer. So I have little extra time and haven’t touched the Dauntless in over a week either. I did squeeze out about 45 minutes the other night to square out the mold ribbed piece I will be using for the Olds mold. I then took the extra from that piece and did some testing with the 1/8” ball mill. Coming in .080 from the edge, I milled all four sides to the same depth, or height as the mold is really made in mirror image of the part. I will bore a hole in the center then turn up a plug with a 1/8” bead turned around the outside to simulate the shifter plate. The test piece will be a lot smaller with a much smaller hole but it’s the process and the look of the cast rubber that will tell us if we’re getting the look we want. With the test piece we can change the depth of theplug together the right height of the beaded edge around the hole and the right height of bead edge around the outside edge. This test piece won’t have rounded corners nor will it be set in a surround mold with the tapered edge, again like the shifter plate has. Once the testing is done with the piece to satisfactory results, then I’ll move on to rounded corners and making the angled surround with radius corners. 

   Doing a little bit at a time and testing as we go. Second picture is of the squared piece that will be used for the actual mold. The other pictures show the test piece with all 1/8” bead filed and polished of tool marks. Now to bore the center hole and make up the plug.

F956ABC2-DF5C-41AD-B546-92D1F0BF95D7.jpeg

6121D1D8-54C8-411B-8E18-537B7C8965C6.jpeg

4C33DF43-7E04-4D11-A8EE-8C7901DFA47F.jpeg

551EAB2E-CC77-4DCF-B8E3-115B87D2E849.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Got another small project done tonight. The Olds headlights use a small diameter dual contact twist lock plug. The problem is, and there’s always a problem with parts for the Olds, is no one make a plug for them and my original headlights had been switched out with Chevy ones. I did find the correct diameter, dual contact plugs but the two twist lock pins were in the wrong position to allow the contacts to align with the socket housing in the headlight. I flattened the two pins and using a pointed punch, put in two locking pings in the correct position. The pins aren’t even at 180 to each other but are about 170d so the plug can’t be put in wrong. The Olds also used a very small diameter conduit so I was able to purchase German silver .330 diameter conduit from restoration supply. I purchased the German silver instead of SS for one main reason, the ability to solder it. The plug housings were reamed to allow the conduit to just pass through the rear. I then took some 7/16” brass tubing and cut off a couple thin rings from it. The rings were soldered to the very end conduit with silver solder and now the metal housing cannot be pulled off the conduit yet can turn without turning the conduit. I used the same tubing to make the two special ferrules that hold the ends of the short conduits to horns. Again I soldered the conduit to the inside of the brass ferrules. The conduit will now be polished bright and the brass ferrules with the two steel plug housings will go for chrome. Very happy with the results as it yielded almost an original look to the whole headlight and horn conduits. As you can see, the plug and the conduit is of very small diameter compared to most headlight connections. The brass horn conduit shown is the one original piece I have. It was originally chrome over the brass and steel ferrules. Some glass beading revealed the  brass conduit. I couldn’t get the exact type of coil look but it is what it is.

1CE87FFC-AB67-434C-85B1-A31C61D7C64A.jpeg

6D9E9B8F-250D-48C7-B791-985AA32A4D54.jpeg

1EDCEA69-71FA-4BC5-BDF9-B0B1CD92BDA3.jpeg

0D690C8B-DCDE-43E4-A3E6-35A168A56BB7.jpeg

738DFC8C-B18C-4369-AE62-3BF3502C87F0.jpeg

Edited by chistech (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got an hour squeezed out last night on the test mold. Got out to the garage about 9:00 pm and fired up the heat as it’s still cold here along the ocean. Ground up a special 1/8” round cutter bit for my lathe and turned a plug out of 1” aluminum down to .752 on about 5/8” of the end. With the cutter, I was able to cut in the area to replicate the raised beaded edge around the hole for the shifter. Drilled a hole undersized and used a ream for a friction fit.  Again, this is all undersized and just for testing purposes to determine the heights we will be setting between the different component pieces of the mold.

705F29EF-2C52-45AA-B2EA-EE9F16ABB07E.jpeg

68C03842-7DDB-4489-99E6-1A04AF9863EA.jpeg

5C6624F0-F0EA-44C5-A596-4825B07564F4.jpeg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the test piece all set to send to joe. Made up two sides out of some junk aluminum. First milled a .500 wide area .10 deep, then put the piece in the vice on a 60d angle to mill from the .10 on the outside down to .508 to match the height of the center rib/ groove section. The two pieces are at right angles to each other and .45 degrees were milled just to make the square corner to match the center section. I milled a hole then drilled and tapped for a cap screw to hold it together. The finished mold will be all radiused corners but wasn’t going to get that technical and waste time just for height testing. Put in a 1/4-20 set screw to hold the center plug at height so it can be adjusted up or down to our liking. Joe will just dam up the off sides with tape. He will make up test pieces and change the heights to our liking then take all measurements so the final mold will be set to go once assembled. If you look close in the pictures you can see how the bead will be formed at the edges of the ribbed piece and the side border pieces. Because of the nature of the beast so to say, the outside 1/8” beaded edge is round to the inside and straight sided to the border side. Trying to get it round on the outside edge gives a too thin of edge that becomes broken and jagged which would result in an ugly casting.

07EC5EEA-A805-4E7B-960E-3D86A8E4F671.jpeg

03F31E8B-0847-40AD-BB12-4F3C639FD298.jpeg

C28F77E1-686D-46DC-AFF8-35B92BD864F8.jpeg

8D7AEE9E-EFCD-4907-BD7C-DB82682FF3E7.jpeg

C48FCE5A-21EC-4E12-B4C3-D805FE9CF2F6.jpeg

405A62BA-3992-4AE5-89C4-87F09531B3FD.jpeg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, John S. said:

Ted, any new updates? Thanks. John

Hi John,

have done very little and either has Gilly. His paint shop has been straight out and there has been no spare room for him to paint my stuff. I believe he is painting my doors, garnish moldings, luggage rack, and rack mounts this Thursday. Work has been very busy with big corporate changes and my spare time has been taken up by remodeling my kitchen. A complete strip of everything to bare walls, installing a much larger window, and doing the same in an attached half bath has kept me very busy. Window is in, solid hickory cabinets are all in but one, and the vanity has been installed in the half bath. Hours have been spent sourcing the sinks, faucets, tile, and appliances. A ton of work and I won’t even bring up the cost but I could have easily bought a decent classic car for sure. I don’t have an up to date photo with the new hickory island in but will post later. The kitchen used to be red oak. Funny how we went with the same wood as the spokes on the Olds wheels!

 

On a car note, joe cast the test mold and it came out really nice other than the rubber itself is bad so there was some lumps in places. I’ll take a picture and post it later.

583CACDE-FA34-421C-95DB-65F8A531BE75.jpeg

6431E87D-3F8E-4AE7-B5C8-52C5B6DB8612.jpeg

4FDA3DCE-E1D4-4CA5-954B-80FAB6D55226.jpeg

0EE824DC-6D71-4A29-819B-F2F01830CB65.jpeg

Edited by chistech (see edit history)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ted, I take my hat off to you. Restoring the Olds, or putting in a kitchen, you do top notch work. Thanks. John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

LOL John, my wife is a much tougher “judge” of my work than any judge I might encounter at a car show. She walks around just looking for things so it’s got to be damn near perfect or I hear about it. I can’t even imagine doing a good job on a car and half assing something for her or our home! Here’s some more updated pictures including tonight’s work. Even with making drilling jigs, putting all the handles on took over two hours! Not much left to do finally. The counter top company is coming Monday to measure for all the quartz tops we’re installing. Have to be all done with my work for them to measure.

6C3D7BF2-67B9-44FE-AE16-A2A8B6379166.jpeg

D884C7B0-5466-4EE1-A153-B75ED0D31885.jpeg

0EE44DF4-12B5-4752-BF99-7AE0DE1BF9B9.jpeg

Edited by chistech (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took some pictures of the sample joe sent me from the test mold. Time to start working on the final mold. Now if I could just get done with this kitchen, 34’ Chevy pickup, yard clean up/mulching, finishing up my RC plane for an upcoming event,............. I need more time in my day!

A7AEC6AB-FA16-4FAD-9B23-80A2CCBAD152.jpeg

A494984B-B837-4071-BC60-DD2E8A5F78A6.jpeg

09D211EF-98CF-46B1-913D-BC642AF61CCA.jpeg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been there on the renovations! Your hickory cabinets look fantastic. I really like wood cabinets in a kitchen - no use for the modern sterile characterless white MDF stuff that looks like some kind of institution. Yes, it's not cheap but the warmth and beauty of your kitchen will reward you every day. The car will come in its own  time and is going to be just as lovely in its own way.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I totally agree about the wood look. My house is a colonial with full farmers porch. Dining room is done in colonial blue wainscoting and off white walls above it. Living room is 18’ high ceilings with cultured stone fireplace w/pellet stove. Whole downstairs of house is hardwood floors other than the kitchen and master bath. When we decided to do the kitchen over, most of my wife’s friends were telling her whit, gray, and black! They were all going with the recent trends and personal tastes rather than what fit our house. I like country and I like wood. It’s warm rather than the cold everyone is doing and that’s because people have become the same way, cold and hard. I also like firearms and much prefer fine shot guns, old lever actions, and wood gripped hand guns over the Glocks and ARs. That not saying that I don’t have any of those, it just means I appreciate the look of fine wood to metal craftsmanship.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...