chistech

32' Oldsmobile Deluxe Convertible Roadster

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Got a call today that I’ve been hoping to get and waiting a while for. My buddy from the paint shop called to tell me to get the Olds ready as he wants me to bring it down in a few days. Been working to finish up a last few things on the body including getting all remaining sheet metal stripped and primed, repairing the two rumble seat mounting holes in the rumble lid, and putting the drain groove in the top wood rail of the golf bag door. Also drilled the mounting holes for the heater and the two holes for the heater core tubes. Loaded all the hood panels, the pair of running boards, and the lower radiator apron inside the car for the trip. 

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Considering the amount of work you've done on this, and done very well, the paint phase came up quick. You've rounded second, headed for third and home is in sight.

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Drilled the holes to mount the running board moldings. I’m lucky as many 32’ Olds out there today are missing the board moldings. Had the rechromed and they came out nice. Test fit the moldings to the boards and they look really good. Used my small trim router and a half round bit to make the drain groove on the top of the golf bag door.06F7CE7E-0A65-4709-B7E2-A799CCC2C75C.jpeg.a83868a0c9900c11608f99c5ec574617.jpegEA22D89D-A805-4CCE-A10E-9DFF519DF5AC.jpeg.1861e88438c34f1cf9d23cc711401384.jpeg

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Chistech, just wonderful work. Just beautiful work.

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Thank you for those kind words John. 

 

Ted

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Been doing some last minute work on the two door windows trying to get them to work a little easier. My frames are the aftermarket SS ones and they are a little thick so my neighbor sanded them down and polished them up. The drivers door works good but the passenger door was still tight. After a few hours of this and that (Cabriolet doors are a PITA), I finally figured out the issue. The wood in that door has a slight warp and it makes the center of the rubber channel bind the window. What’s crazy is the passenger door is all original and the drivers door is the one I scarfed in the lower end of the latch side and that door gives me no problem! I finally got it straightened out and the window is working great. Not loose, not tight. 

     I got the manifold back from the machine shop and installed it back on the motor. It was warped pretty bad and he had to take off almost 3/32” to get it true. No wonder the exhaust leaked when I started it up. Can’t figure how the hell I missed that one!

     Worked on the mid bow iron by installing a new blind nut where one was rusted out (they’re welded on) and the sand blasted all the nooks to get it ready to prime. I also got in a glass scratch removal kit I bought off eBay to try and remove all the scratches from my headlight lenses. 32’ Olds use a special lens and they are hard to find. When you do find nice ones, the price is usually in the hundreds. Both my lenses are scratched pretty badly but I have to say the kit works really well. Problem is the kit only has enough discs for about 1 1/2 lenses so I need to order more. It will end up costing about $50 to do both. Not bad and very decent results. It’s hard to see how bad it was scratched in the picture (I’m holding it up to the light coming in my door) but the result is easy to see in the other  two pictures. Took about two hours to do one lens letting my batteries for my drill charge. 

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Got my chassis all set to test drive tonight. Bolted up a test body that I’ve been using on all the cars I work on. An old Chevy blazer seat finishes it of. Started the engine back up tonight, first time since the manifold was surfaced. It ran super nice and it’s ready to be test driven. The problem is starting tomorrow, New England is supposed to have heavy rain for the next few days but I’ll try and fit my little driveway gaunt in. Made up a new video of the car running but it’s too long to post here.

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My good RC plane buddy came over Friday with his high coverage air brush and a mixture of gloss black epoxy enamel and harder. After wiping down my repaired steering wheel and horn button, he shot both with a few coats of the black. The paint used is the same paint we use on our nitromethane powered models and not only is it a hard wearing paint, but it’s resistant to most solvents making it the ideal paint for the steering wheel. I installed the wheel on my spare spider (the good one is at the paint shop), installed the chromed center cup, horn button contacts, and the horn button to test the assembly for full ground. All worked properly. One more step done. Wheel will now come off and be put away until final assembly.

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Put a coat of varnish on my front roof bow today. I purchased this hard to make part from one of the better wood parts suppliers but even this bow, as good as it was, wasn’t completely correct. The ends had been milled to deep where the chrome corner brackets mount which means if left as is, the corner brackets would not have been even with the metal piece and gasket that runs the length of the bow. One end was worse than the other so I cut some ash pieces up and glued them in. Some hand chisel workand sanding finished the job. It will get a few more coats of varnish to seal it up and it will be ready for assembly when the time comes.

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I can only enter a few pictures because m6 iPad takes them in too large of a format. Here’s the rest.

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With the body, all the sheet metal, and all the wheels at the paint shop, the shop got a good cleaning. I needed to make up some side mount down rods because at one time mine were replaced with aluminum rods. Got some 1/2” steel rod and cut 1/2-20 threads on each end about 3” up. One end on each rod gets rounded so I turned them on the lathe. After, they both got sanded and then polished on the lathe before sending them out today for chrome.

      The 6 body mount bolts have heavy domed washers under them and most of mine were too rusted out to use so I purchased some ogee washers and turned them on the lathe to the correct shape. They don’t have the square holes that the originals do but with the carriage bolts in place, no one will be able to tell the difference.

      I also made up a couple gas pedal ball top standoff’s on the lathe. Most of the originals have rotted away but I was able to locate a decent original so I could copy it. A bunch more of small stuff done just waiting for final assembly to come. 

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Posted (edited)

*Finally!!!!!!!!! Worked on the wheels tonight at the paint shop. I had them all prepped as far as clean of all varnish on the metal and everything metal scotchbright padded. Of the six wheels, four are in as excellent condition as anyone could hope for 86 years old wheels with the hub and rim virtually pit free and smooth steel. Two others however have a fairly pitted surface requiring the surface to be glazed over and sanded then repeated a few times to get them right. It took 2 1/2 hrs to get the worst wheel done for priming! Moe started with the worst wheel first and will go over one of the best wheels tomorrow so he’ll be two wheels ahead of me. I’ll be masking them on Monday to get the ready to shoot the gray urethane primer. Once all six are primed they’ll all be wet sanded and prepped for final color painting. Between the stripping of the original finish, sand blasting of the metal, bleaching of the wood, varnishing of the wood, prepping of the metal, masking,  priming, wet sanding, final painting, and pin-striping, it would not surprise me if each wheel will have 40-60 hours of work into them! The amount of work is just incredible for a single wheel if you want to do them right. The two wheels requiring the most work will be my spares and the four that are like new will be my service wheels. While any pits and marks from damage have been filled, any factory seam and forming lines have been left. Leaving those original areas also makes for even more tedious finger sanding! You can see the electro-weld line across the rim at about 2:30 in the bottom picture. This weld is prominent in all six wheels and has to be visible in the finished wheel.

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Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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just got to add my 2 cents worth--isn't that dolphin glaze good stuff--I've great results with it--used it on my 13 caddy wheels,which I painted--car's looking good--Tom

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My paint guy, Moses says it’s the most expensive but by far the best he’s ever used. He applied it with a rubber gloved finger and put on just barely enough to do the job. I told him to glaze another up and he just said “no”, you’ll remove too much material and I’ll just have to do it over again! He’s probably right and that’s why he’s my body and paint guy.

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it sands so easy too--being someone who built totals for years that really didn't care what the final result looked like or how long it lasted--Tom

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This glaze holds up great, especially when put on thin. Even though it sands easy, it doesn’t chip off easy at all. The problem is how people use it. They put it on thick and expect it to be like epoxy rather than using it as glaze is intended to be used.

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Realized I posted this in a wrong forum so I’m posting it again in the correct area.
 
 

Got my newly aluminized headlight reflectors back from  Uvira yesterday. Today I assembled them back into the buckets. Bill at Uvira recommends running a ground directly to the bulb socket. Not sure if this is because of the new aluminum coating or the probability that many don’t have good grounds on their cars and then probably complain that their recoated reflectors aren’t that bright. Anyway, I soldered a wire directly to the bucket sockets and drilled and tapped the reflector sockets for attaching the wire terminal after the sockets and wiring is assembled into the buckets. I will run a ground wire inside the flexible conduit soldering one end to the inside of the twist lock plug and attaching the other end to the frame under the hood. 

    Installed new cork gaskets into the reflectors then installed the reflectors into bucket with the two perimeter screws. With the new reflectors and the nicely polished lenses, the headlights look crystal clear and brilliant.

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Couple more pictures of the finished assembled headlights.

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Just got through skimming through all of your posts in this discussion. Nice work. I guess I now have another one that I have to read daily. I will especially be looking forward to your post in about 3 or 4 days, but I won't spill the beans on why.    

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I did the same thing with my '37....  UVIRA coated reflectors and a dedicated ground wire to each socket.  They look fantastic when lit, and I kept the original 6V bulbs.  I did not use halogen bulbs.

 

Keep up the great work!  Always look forward to your posts!

 

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Posted (edited)

As most in this hobby know, it’s more than less, we’re always waiting for something. Whether its the machine shop, the paint shop, the chrome plater, the interior manufacturer, wiring harness company, etc., we always are waiting for something for our cars and many times, the wait can be from weeks to months. 

     Just a couple weeks ago I was very surprised when my headlight reflectors came back in the mail after being away for just nine days total! Now that’s service and something I’m just not used to in this hobby. I also figured it couldn’t get any better than that. Well, I was wrong. One of the very first projects I tackled on my Olds was machining a new lock cylinder and dust cover for my golf bag door. The originals often deteriorate because they were made of white metal so I had to make my own. While my lock cylinder and dust cover looked very close to the original, it lacked the BASCO logo on the dust cover. I thought that possibly I could find someone, some day, that could engrave the logo on the cover for me. I also needed to get my new sill data plate numbers engraved because the font Oldsmobile used in 32’ doesn’t come close to any number stamp set I can find. I wanted both these items as OEM correct as possible.

     While reading other restoration threads here in this forum, I read a post from our own Matt Hinson in his Buick thread stating that he had been doing some engraving. DING, DING, immediately the bell went off and I PM’d Matt. After a couple emails, we agreed on attempting the project and I mailed the lock cylinder with the data plate to him this past Monday. The package arrived with Matt on Wednesday and later that day, I received an email with images of my FINISHED data plate and lock cylinder dust cover! Matt shipped them out on Thursday and they arrived today. So just when I thought it couldn’t get any better than Ulvira’s service, along comes Matt and blows it out of the water. I’m pretty sure things can’t get any better! 

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Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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Thanks for the kind words. I like to be able to help out other hobbyists and I enjoy a challenge.  As you know, after you sent me the photo of the BASCO logo, I created it from scratch on the computer using my engraving software to create the diamond shape. I then simply created 5 separate individual text sections which I could then manually enlarge as needed and place in the right location to create the correct effect, which while certainly not a perfect copy of the original, looks convincing in the small logo. 

 

For the data plate it was a bit more involved than a "regular" engraving job. Most of the text just required typing in the correct font. Unforunately none of the fonts that I use have quite the correct "I" for the "1" so I used a standard "I" and used software's shape creation capability and created the top and bottom lines manually. The "6" is probably the strangest element of the whole design. I used my software to create a vertical line and then used it to create a couple of arcs that I could position to form the bottom loop of the "6".  The line spacing was a bit odd, so I did each line individually and repositioned the data plate on the engraving machine and taped it down in the correct position to engrave each line separately. If anybody else needs a similar job I now have all of that information saved so I can more easily do another similar one in the future. While a bit time consuming, it was a fun deviation from my normal day to day engraving jobs.  Thanks again!

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