Jump to content

Packard Information


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am very impressed with the level of expertise that has been displayed on this website! So I am going to ask a whole lot of new guy questions in this post, and I would like everyone to contribute to the answers that I need to be given, I dont want anyone to be shy. I have been exploring the Packard name now for about a year, and have collected a good bit of reference material on the post war Packards. I by no means have a complete library, and I am making no claims to have even a great start. I have purchased original Packard reference material like repair manuals, and parts books, as well as reprints. I must confess due to limited monetary funds, I have only purchased these items for the cars that I collect, and that is the 1951-1956 years.<P>I have seen no indication that there has been any effort to computerize these documents. This is where I will need alot of help and guidance. First question, has anyone seen any kind of computerized look up or database for Packard parts? Again I must admit that in my limited world of post war packard part hunting, I have not seen anything. I have a number of books but nothing computerized.<P>This is my second question. I beg all of the "classic" car collectors to forgive my ignorance of the older models, and provide me with the tutelage that I need. Is there a reliable parts catalog available for the early models of Packards, and if so how far back can you go? This is a two part question so the second part is, if you have seen the way the parts books are laid out for the 50's models, I would like to know if it is the same format for the earlier models?<P>Thanks for being patient, here is the rest of the story. In real life I am a software test engineer, that is to say I travel around the country to large to medium sized companies that have had software written for them, or have had developed in the company. I appraise the software and then subject the software to various tests to make sure it will work properly. I have seen some bad inventory software, some really bad inventory software, and some really terrible inventory software. Needless to say, I have not really seen any decent inventory software. The reason I bring this up is I might have a purpose to convert my post war parts documentation into a computerized version. I have access to some very talented programmers that will be able to help me make this a reality. I would have the opportunity to customize this software to reflect the needs of true Packard owners. One thing that you learn early when you design programs is that you get the requirements for the users correct the first time and very early in the project. So here we go. I need an education in the earlier model Packards to know that we could use the same set of requirements for.<P>Now for the other part. I would need to sink some money into this endeavor in order to get it started. So this would have to be a money making project. My third question is IF this were to be made available, how much would it be worth to have a lookup on your computer for this type of information? I personally would probably pay 40-50 dollars if someone were to do a decent job with it, but that is my estimate. I would like to hear your feedback on the value for the money, and if you think others would be interested in the product.<P>I am soliciting feedback here so be brutally honest. Tell me what you would like to see in something that would provide us with a useful tool in finding, locating, and keeping track of all the parts we have. I will be embarking on this project regardless of a true market appeal. I am going to convert my 51-54 parts book into a database, along with pictures of the parts, for my own personal use. If there is enough interest from others who would like to see more years and different things from the software, I would love to hear about it.<P>Thanks for reading, Let the posting begin...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would change the ground rules on you immediately. A Packard parts inventory is a great idea AND if it included an interchange index so that you may obtain the same part for an Oldsmobile and use it in your Packard so much the better. Many Packard parts are manufacturer only but a lot of equipment can be taken from other vehicles and used as is. A tick mark on the part to indicate you should go to other index may be all that is necessary<BR>YFAM, Randy Berger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robert: Nice to see you on the forum. Yes, I agree CD ROM would be the way to go. I also understand that without all the service letters and such the books the Packard Club and other sources sell have some holes in them. Since my only interest is in 55 stuff I can't realy add to what you don't know 100 times over.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bob,<BR> There is a Service Parts List for the Packard Six covering models 126-133-226-233-326- 333-426-433-526-533 and issued in August, 1927. It contains "Piece number", "Name", and model application. There are numerous illustrations of the various parts.<BR> There is a Service Parts List for the Packard Super-Eight Models 1500-1501-1502-1603- 1604-1605 and the Packard Twelve Models 1506-1507-1508-1607-1608-1707-1708 issued in 1939. It contains a general part name index, a numerical index, stockroom memoranda, and listings by "Piece number", "Name", and model application. There are numerous illustrations of the various parts.<BR> There is a Packard Master Parts List 1935-1941 covering models 120-A, 120B-BA, 120C- CA-CD, 115C, 138CD, 1600, 1601-A-D-2, 1700, 1701-A-2, 1703-A-5, 1800, 1801-A, 1803-A- 4-5-6-7-8, 1900-T1900, DE1900, 1901-A, DE1903, 1903-A-4, 1905-6-7-8 issued in 1944 and reprinted in 1947. It contains chassis alphabetical index, and listings by "Group index number". "Part number", "Description and Model Application". There are some illustrations.<BR> There is a 1941-1947 Clipper Master Parts Book covering models 1951, 2000-10, 2001-11, 2003-06, 2100-30, 2101-11, 2103-06-26 Second edition 12-49. It contains a general information section, chassis alphabetical index, and listings by "Group index number", "Part number", "Description and Model Application" with illustrations. There is also a numerical index.<BR> There is a 48-54 Packard Parts and Accessories List covering the 22nd thru 54th Series dated December 1954. It has extensive general information, illustrations and a parts listing by "Group index number", "Part number", "Description and Model Application" . It also has a numerical index.<BR>That is the extent of my personal library. All are available from the Packard Club. I'm sure that there is similar documentation for the models and years not covered by these.<P>My preference for an electronic version would be a searchable CD-ROM.<BR>jnp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

two questions:<BR>1. how long have u been involved with the 51-56 Packards that u collect as per your above post.<P>2. which or what Packard car clubs, Packard Parts vendors and/or other FOR-PROFIT entities are you associated with in anyway????

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In response to Packard V8's two questions:<P>1. I have owned a Packard for about 2 years now.<P>2. I am a member of THE Packard Club, and also a member of the Peachstate Packard Club here in my home city of Atlanta. I am in no way a vendor, but you might have to convince my wife otherwise with as many parts that I buy off of ebay! The only profit making group that I am associated with perhaps is the company that pays my wages when I am not working, or thinking about Packards.<P>I am not real sure about the questions though? From your type set and type of questions you must think that I would be in this for making millions of dollars??? Well I am just a regular guy who would like to do something to try and get my parts organized and on my computer, if it helps some others out that is great, but I will probably be spending near 500-1000 hours of time just getting the information together and in a format to be used, then probably another 500-1000 hours developing the application. Then another 500 or so hours trying to get it all working. I am not sure about you, but that is a substancial amount of time and effort, and yes money after I pay the developers for a decent programming effort.<P>To address the other posts, thanks for the input, The search for parts that would be interchangable is a great suggestion, although I would need to get one of the interchange manuals in order to make it happen. I will start to look for a manual, I see them on ebay all the time. The format will definitely be a CD, it is probably the only format that would hold that much information. The service bulletins could be certainly put in as well. Maybe as a feature that is seperate from the parts. We could have a link to the part if it is ever listed in a service bulletin, and if it was given a replacement part or whatever we could supply the note that goes along with it.<P>One thing that has been "under documented" in my opinion is the codes that were used to describe the trim. I have something that gives a general list of them, but not very detailed. If anyone has anything that is picture oriented (color if possible) I would appreciate the information or where I can go to find it. I have started looking for fabric and interior references, but they really command some high prices when being auctioned. I had my sights set on a PAGE of fabrics used in 1955 and it went for over $100.00 on ebay! I bought a 1956 page for $20.00, and am looking to get a few more. If anyone knows of a shorter path to accomplish this let me know. I am toying with creating a second CD for the package that would include some of the history, and other interesting "stuff" that Packard collectors might want to see. Any feedback on those would be great too.<P>Again thanks for all of the information, I will start to ask some fellow club members here in atlanta that own some of the older documentation to let me look at it.<P>Thanks everyone! Keep the comments coming....Especially about things that are tough to find or get ahold of.<P>Thanks again<P>Robert

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mr.Johnson: I think you have an excellent idea. I have alot of the 50's Packard stuff that Mr. Packard lists. The one thing I think I have that not many other people have is a complete set of Packard tech letters complete from 1948 to 1956. There are two other people I know who also have a complete set.. I just recently purchased a complete set of repair manuals on the ultramatic trans.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An excellent idea! I've been collecting bits of information from the posts of folks on this and other chat rooms and saving them in a WORD file. That is fine for limited amounts of information, but ---. With no idea of how much info a CD will hold vs. the amount of information available that you can catalog, I'll suggest that you consider breaking your information into blocks with one block per CD. My interest (at least for now) if '55-'56, with lesser interest back to '51. That might fill a CD. If not, include the post-war in one offering. As for price, what you suggested seems fair, but with a limited market it may take awhile to recover your investment. I hope you follow through. Good Luck!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I currently own a 1951 200 deluxe, a 1952 200 deluxe, a 1955 Constellation, and a very rusty 1953 300. I also own some cars that are still in Texas, and they are a 1955 Panama, a 1953 Mayfair, and a 1951 200, there is a parts car thrown in, but I am not sure what it is yet.<P>I dont have anything right now that is a show car, or dependable driver, so I am looking right now for some possible candidates. The 53 Mayfair, and the 51 200 deluxe are in great shape, but not dependable yet, the others are works in progress. I have collected quite a few parts to make most of these cars viable restorations, now like everyone, I need some time and money to get them perfect.<P>I am a babe in the woods so to speak with my experience in restoration. I have done alot of work on trucks and cars, all of them modern, and to some extent light mechanical stuff by everyone in here's standard, not rebuilding engines and things. I am very glad to have access to all of you guys that have knuckle busted experience. When I get to the heavier stuff in my restoration, like mechanicals, and engine, you will be seeing me post some really stupid questions!<P>I have been reading alot of the repair manuals and service bulletins, and other Packard stuff, to get up to speed on the cars and how they are put together, I always like to read, and study, and talk to people before I start something, especially on something that I have not done a whole lot of before.<P>Again thanks for all of the suggestions above...Please keep them coming. As to the question about the CD storage capacity, you can get over 700 megs on a CD, and that is alot of information. I will keep adding these suggestions into the requirements to make this successful! Your feedback is very important to me since we are such a small group being interested in something like this.<P>Robert

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Certainly, u have my encouragement and i'll try to share as much technical information as i can for your endeavor. Most of my Packard-specific experience is with the V8 models 55-56. There is still ALOT that i dont know about them.<BR>There is one thing that has me perplexed about the Packard Community as a whole. Several people have responded to this thread indicating that they are a member of one of the 'clubs'. WHY IS IT that none of the 'clubs' have any reference material avialable to its DUES PAYING MEMBERS????? WHY IS IT that WE as INDIVIDUALS have to come up with this information on our own???<BR>EXAMPLE: WILL any of the 'clubs' give us a current SPECIFIC part number for a hydraulic lifter for a V8 so we can go to a LOCAL DISCOUNT CHAIN and order them??????? I have just such a number and in fact have the lifters setting on the bench at home rite now ready to install in about a week from now. Price???? about 5 bucks each. Go look them up at a supplier. Look, i could sit here and fill this forum with at least a page full of experiences i've had over the last 6 months in obtaining engine parts for my 56 V8. NO, i do NOT belong to any of the 'clubs'. BUT, it does NOT seem to me that any of YOU WHO DO BELONG TO THE 'clubs' are getting any of the IMPORTANT information that a DUES PAYING member should be getting. HOW 'bout a timing chain for $32 instead of $50-60????? I got one of those NEW IN A BOX from a local parts store.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Packard v-8<BR>Just because one belongs to a club does not mean that the information is going to flow forth like a bubbling brook. A lot of the local regions and chapters of the national organization do not have the info they have to dig it out of the national organization, and sometime you have to e very specific with what you ask for, because he people at the national level do not know. Take PAC for example, I doubt that you could get info like what packard parts interchange with other cars because brand - x talk is not allowed. It is going to take people like us to get together and make it happen. Robert also touched on the other snag, COST. Nobody is willing to do anything unless they make a fortune at it. I tried to put together a computer system to handle car show judging, simply plug in the numbers, press a key and the result spewed forth. I designed it, laid out the screens for it, all i wanted was for this guy to write the code. I could have sold this to car clubs cheaply and made money on it. The programmer who was a colleague of mine would not do it unless he got all his money up front, and we were talking a few zeroes. If it were main-frame stuff i could do it myself but PC oriented code is out there for me. I would have to take lasses and no one is offering any right now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Parts interchange: For Kaisers and Hudsons, such parts listings and interchanges are available online to a certain extent, especially part numbers like NAPA/Echlin. Now the Hollanders series are "ok" but have not been that useful to me. Then for Chryslers 1954-62 or so there exists a book of parts interchanges and I saw it recently on ebay for under $20.00. Few of these books I have seen, however, really get down to the nitty gritty like points, voltage regulators, carburetors, starters and generators, fuel pumps, gas tank sending units, etc. And in most cases the original manuals are useless for things like gas tanks and sending units.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am maintaining my own log of parts interchanges and you might be surprised to learn that contact points for a 1955 Packard are exactly the same for a 1954 Kaiser. I have learned of many many parts interchanges for shocks, u-joints, brakes, etc. from looking at items on ebay. I see something interesting that lists different applications, I print it out and save it. Or, like when I got a new Heater Control Valve for my '53 Hudson, on the end of the box were all these other models of car it would fit and the box was actually a Mopar box, so mI recorded that information. Just yesterday I needed a carburetor gasket for my '54 H-car and found a match in the book at CarQuest and have recorded that information and shared with the HET guys.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am taking some precautions on the inter exchange topic. I have purchased some "outside" verification books to help do some of the cross referencing that everyone is talking about. I have a few carburetor books that list the carbs used on the packards, and yes they cross reference alot of the parts with other models. This would require an incredible amount of time to cross these parts to "generic" parts. I think what would be best for us, is to get it cross referenced to a major part number, like Remy, or Carter, or some other big part name, and then the user can find "generic" parts references at NAPA, or other car parts stores. If you have done the first step of getting the part referenced to one of the bigger names, it should be alot easier to get the "generic" parts.<P>I would love to have a reference section that is "hard knocks" based. If we find something that works, or is available I would be happy to list it on the CD.<P>Keep the feedback coming, I am getting my network at my house set up in the next week, so I will start this project sometime in the next month.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The X-refing often becomes a forked road. For example: the Packard V8 distributor Cap has a Delco number that crosses into Standard Products DR-427. BUT, in somecases knowing the DR-427 number mite not help if<BR>your parts store does not deal with Std. PRd. SO, that means we need to know the VEHICLE CROSS APPLICATION. In the case of the distributor cap mentioned above 55-56 Chevy V8 is the same (among others i cant remember). <P>One mite argue that finding a cap for 55-56 Chevy is as bad as finding one for Packard. NOT necessarily true. There r ALOT more chevy guys (and gals) around than there r Pack guys so that increases chances of locating one.<P>My recommendation is to list ALL X-ref numbers and X-vehicle application.......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

let me tell a little story here. Read between lines too.<BR>About 1992 i needed a set of points for a 75 comet. Looked thru my box of points and had nothing to match. So, i went to the local auto parts store and the experienced parts man walked into the back and brought me out a set of points sealed in a box. He did not even have to look it up in the book because it was such a common sale item (ford 6 cyl). Price: about 3 bucks. Coincidently, a week later i needed a set of points for a 65 Jeep 4cyl F head. In haste, i ran to the parts store again and it took 2 men and a girl scout to look it up in a book. He ran back there got the points and sold them to me for about 5 bucks. Later, i got to thinking. I still had the box that the COMET points came in and it was IDENTICLE IN EVERY WAY INCLUDING PART NUMBER to the Jeep points. The Jeep points were 2 dollars more. (he looked the price up in book). Multiply this experience by about 100 times and thats what i have ran into over the years. One thing is FOR sure. when attempting to buy parts for a Packard THE LAST THING u want tell anyone is that it is for a Packard. If i wasnt so tired of typing i'd present more twists to this parts thing. Things like discount auto retailers selling an identicle part for different prices but at different 'warranties'. The auto parts bussiness is quagmire of diabolical plots. My point to all of this is that both the aftermarket part number AND the manufacturer number AND the VEHICLE model X-ref is all important. No one part of it is better than the other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A big problem I have encountered many times over is that the NAPA and CarQuest and etc. parts houses CANNOT cross reference back to the Autolite and Delco numbers from the 50s. IF you can come up with a good NAPA #, then you can easily cross reference to Standard/Blue Streak which CarQuest sell. Voltage Regulators are a good example of this, but I have had no problem whatsoever in finding a Voltage Regulator locally at NAPA for any of my cars includiung the rare Kaisers that use both Delco and Autolite dependent upon the model. And, as Keith was indicating, some of this is by trial and error, like points for a '54 Kaiser 6-cylinder being perfect for the '55 Packard V-8.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well it looks like we touched on the interexchange nerve! I have been doing some planning and it seems that a seperate function may need to happen. Aside from the parts lookup piece of it, there may be a function where you input the Packard part, and what comes back is as much information about the part as possible. Regardless of year, part type, part manufacturer, or other information, the information that comes back could be all of the above. This would be a monumental effort of gathering information and confirming of "suggested fits" from someone who has heard it may work. I would definitely only provide what could be confirmed.<P>Again thanks for providing me with input. Any other suggestions will be helpful!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

a monumental effort indeed. With regard to car parts we must remember that we are dealing with a rather complex subject in that even the most humble of auto parts stores requires at least 3 experienced full time people to run it. Most people do not realize that. But, then again, most people just DONT CARE. They pays their money and takes their chances. If they ever had to keep 5 or 6 cars, a couple a m/c's and a tractor or 2 running for more time than it takes to loose interest then they would go BROKE on their their butts with the 'just do it' or 'do it now' attitude. Bottom Line: i'll accept any honest lead or educated guess about an X-ref or retro-fit if NO BETTER info is available. Thats the way i stumbled onto the lifters. AND, there is another important part of the info stream: that of RETRO-fit. Some of us have solid retro to replace the Treadle-vac unit with a modern unit that nearly bolts rite on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What a great idea! We could offer a section for recommended upgrades, and advice. I will call it the Busted Knuckle Korner! Lessons learned while upgrading, things that work, and other things that make you go...HHHHHMMMMMM.......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...