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this squeaking is driving me nuts!!!! cant figure it out


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My 1958 buick special has developed a squeak in the gas peddle. if i push the gas pedal with my foot to the left it quits. I have lubed it I have sprayed it with graphite and it comes back. obviously I cant be under the hood looking at exactly what is making the noise. I know it the gas pedal as when I lift off it quits and push down the squeak comes back. any help would be great as Im pulling my hair out over this noise

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My '58 Special does this too and I know there was a spring on the linkage to the firewall at one time which, if I'm correct, some one here found a service memo that stated this was to correct this issue. look at the top of the linkage at the firewall and see if there is a hole in one of the arms. I'm not at the car right now or would snap a shot for you. My spring is missing but should be able to show you later what I mean. 

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4 hours ago, SpecialEducation said:

Yeah, the '56 does the same thing. Ours has 2 places that will sweak. The rod will rub on the hole in the floor, and it will squeak at the first joint down. 

 

I'm glad I'm not the only one! My gas pedal squeaks every time I take my foot off and the rod rests on the edge of the hole through the firewall. I corrected it by taking some vacuum tubing, cutting it to the circumference of the hole, slicing it down one side and fitting it over the edge of the hole. Now the rod rubs against the rubber, not the metal. Squeak gone!

 

I've never had the second squeak, though.

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(Wondering how these "contact issues" evolved, considering that they were probably not "designed-in" by the vehicle engineers?  Body mounts settling?  Powertrain mounts compressing?  Slight "sags" in places we might not expect?)

 

Beemon's rubber insulation is a good, quick fix.  Certainly better than "clearancing" the contact area to not be a contact area.  OR "selectively re-forming" the rod itself.  A rubber "squeak" might be damped somewhat with the softer contact surface, too.

 

NTX5467

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Probably as #8 suggested and the fact that almost nobody presses straight down on the accelerator pedal, that is straight with the direction of the rod under the pedal.

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I think a lot of the accelerator noise has to do with the spline connection at the rod to the carburetor. If it's not pulled all the way up before tightening, then it moves the twist rod up and down during pedal movement. I can't say for certain why mine is the way it is except for it was broken at the cut out section for the c-clip where it goes into the bracket mounted on the firewall. But if others are having similar issues, then maybe I can rule out my father's TIG job.

 

For other squeaks, such as transmission linkage, hood and door hinges, etc., I've used the WD40 white lithium spray can to great success. My hood now flutters up and down with ease and my door strikers aren't making "metal to metal" clinks anymore. Note that this did help my accelerator pedal squeak, but not entirely as I did implement the vacuum tubing method later.

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On some '60s-era GM vehicles, there were plastic bushings for the accel rod linkage and even some multi-piece with a rubber grommet the plastic bushing slid into, iirc.  Obviously to interrupt a noise transmission path in the pre-cable times.  Might check in some of the repro catalogs for Corvettes and/or C-10 pickups for some of those things.

 

The "foot position/force vector" issue is real! 

 

One OTHER place for some sort of "rubber lube" (possibly including the di-electric silicone or some slick tape) is the BACK of the accelerator pedal which comes into contact wit the accel linkage "paddle", plus the pivot point itself.

 

NTX5467

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