Restorer32

Look what I bought

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It's just a trick of the lighting. The plastic engine cover is actually the same light tan color as the frame and headlight but looks white with the flash.

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AMF is still in business. They own a string of bowling alleys, or to be pc, "bowling establishments". Interesting company, over the years they have made everything from bombs and bowling pin setters to mopeds and nuclear power plants. They used to be a big employer here in York, PA.

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2 hours ago, mercer09 said:

we all tend to regress as we get older- first it's wanting a 396 big block and before you know it, we're riding mopeds..............!

 

:)

 

In my case this moped may be my last ride before a Hoveround.

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Look in the Owner's Manual for the page (usually all by itself) stating it meets US Department of Transportation regulations.

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The mopeds were very popular during the gas shortages of the late 1970s.  Many were purchased for commuter use in areas where the 25mph top speed was not an issue.  Even J C Penny sold one.  They are indeed road legal and in no way made just for off highway use.  The one my son brought home still had its PA moped license plate attached.   Not sure I would ever want to ride one outside the city limits given its limited top speed.

 

Terry

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Interesting to see this. There were several models of AMF Roadmaster mopeds available in the late 1970s to early 1980s. I have several mopeds among my collection of "stuff" including two of these in orange (I also have JC Penney Pinto -made by Puch, as mentioned by another member). What is interesting about the AMF Roadmaster is the unusual design - a rear mounted engine with a friction drive for the rear wheel. The popular (famous?) French Velo-Solex was also a friction drive moped, but it was mounted on the front wheel. Several add-to-your-bicycle kits were available, too, and they all used front wheel friction drive. 

 

These were about the cheapest moped you could buy at the time, but I believe these were the ONLY American made moped during the height of the moped craze in the late 1970s. They were marketed as an alternative for folks that wanted a moped but couldn't afford the European import brands like Puch, Kreidler, or Vespa. Parts that would be metal on a Puch are plastic on the AMF, same goes for finish: plated parts on a Puch are plastic on an AMF. They used a McColloch engines, so engine parts are fairly easy to come by. The moped specific parts were cheaply made and mostly plastic, so they have not survived the test of time very well...they are difficult to find. The best way to get those is to buy another bike to use for parts.  

 

There is zero connection to Harley Davidson except that these were made by AMF while they, as the parent company, owned Harley-Davidson. 

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Thanks, good info. I knew it had no connection with Harley other than AMF was the parent company, a fact most Harley people would like to forget. I would not have bothered with it if it weren't in such nice original shape.  Ordered a new ignition module. Hope to fire it up soon.

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My son brought home a Minarelli moped.  I knew it was something Italian, just wasn't sure of the spelling.  Gold frame with chrome fenders and baskets on the back.  Interesting little contraption.  He's 6' 5" so it does not fit him too well!

Edited by TerryB (see edit history)

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9 hours ago, MCHinson said:

 

I was not questioning the class. I am aware of the class. I am not familar with that particular make and model of moped. I suspect I am not the only one. 

 

There have been some problems with some that were not designed for road use that have managed to get into that class in the past. I am suggesting that you make sure you have your factory documentation that the particular model was designed for road use and not off road use. There have been some that were not originally designed for road use that have had headlights and license plate brackets added after the factory. Just because there is a class for motorized bicycles and mopeds don't mean that every motorized bicycle or moped fits in that class. Factory documentation is the key to answering the question if it were to come up.

 

A few years ago at Hershey I recall seeing a pair of mini-bikes in class 5D, they were in no way designed for road use. They were cute looked like something a circus clown would ride

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The one you have, by the way, is the higher-end model: it has telescopic front forks. 

 

It appears that the lever to raise and lower the engine might be missing. It sticks out from the top of the plastic cowl on the back and lays flat against the top of it. The lever itself was...you guessed it...plastic, so lots of them broke. Otherwise, you seem to have a really nice one on your hands. Definitely worth a little tinkering to get it up and running. They are very slow (like 15mph) but they're fun to ride around on.   

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Happily the engine lever is intact and in good shape. I didn't realize it was supposed to come thru that plastic cover until I looked closely at it.

 

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Interesting thread.  Restorer, perhaps we could drag race - I will bring my late father in law's 1977 Puch, I believe comparable in gobs of power..  

 

Terry B's comment is interesting, as I understand it the Puch was bought as a result of the energy crisis.  He parked his pick up and used it for a 15 mile commute for around a year in decent weather - moving up to a small motorcycle afterwards & parking the Puch.  somehow it ended up in our possession years ago, escaping clean up efforts over the years.  We added a third garage this summer and I moved it for probably the third time since we have owned it - taking all of ten minutes to wash and check it out.  Will be fun to see if we can't get it running next year, cosmetically nice, seems no worse for the wear after spending decades in a basement and sheds.   I never thought of it as an "antique" but we have simply had it too long to discard now... might be good for terrorizing the wild turkeys on our street that are becoming more of a nuisance than a novelty these days.. :) 

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)

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I was heading home from the shop and saw the AMF being rolled out of a garage in preparation for a yard sale. Knew nothing about it but found it interesting. It's a 1979 which is the same year we started in business so hard to view it as an antique.  If you want to drag race show up at space RWO 8 at Hershey. Bring your pink slip. Wild turkeys are soon becoming a nuisance here as well.

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There was a group of conservative elderly gentlemen who rode around town with their mopeds back in the 1980s. We called them "Heck's Angels".

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If it wasn't intended for road use, wouldn't it have been called the "OffRoadMaster"??  Just kidding.

 

The ads for the moped clearly state for "running around campus, running errands, going to work", so that should be sufficient on-road documentation.

 

 

AMF-Ad-1981-Tomorrows-parking-lot.jpg

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2 hours ago, trimacar said:

If it wasn't intended for road use, wouldn't it have been called the "OffRoadMaster"??  Just kidding.

 

The ads for the moped clearly state for "running around campus, running errands, going to work", so that should be sufficient on-road documentation.

 

 

AMF-Ad-1981-Tomorrows-parking-lot.jpg

 

Looks like tomorrows parking lots are here today.

Its just about impossible to navigate a full sized vehicle in your mall lot these days.

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The size of a parking lot space varies depending where you live.  Here, in Winchester, Virginia, the spaces are large enough to park, open all your doors, and still be able to walk around.

 

When I worked in Sacramento, California, the parking spaces were about six inches wider than the narrowest car.  It was awful...........

 

That AMF is a nice find!

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Interesting thread.  Restorer, perhaps we could drag race - I will bring my late father in law's 1977 Puch, I believe comparable in gobs of power..

 

 

We owned a Puch in 1975-it cost 420. new and of course, red. great little bike and wish I still had it. Raced an older fella on a Garelli at the time. was his idea. Of course I pulled away, because I was about 140 IBS at the time-soaking wet! He looked a little disappointed. Wasnt quite a drag race, but fun just the same.........................!

and yes, bought because of the gas crisis. Unfortunately today, you need to register them, pretty much the same as a motorcycle in NJ.

Back then no registration was needed. just jump on and go.

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Well, I am going to need a year to face off with Restorer.  Won't have time to get it running between now and Hershey!  AND the real reason - there is 40 Lbs less of me than there was in the Spring, I am at 200 now, still too much for 5'9"  (I never would have believed it but you do shrink over the years...) I won't get to "ideal" but I feel a lot better now and will feel better in another 20 lbs., the final goal.  I might have a fighting chance at 180...

 

Mercer, do the grey ones go as fast as the red ones?  Ours is grey or silver.  Amazingly, tires are holding air & look OK, brakes appear to work fine, No motorcycle license needed here in CT.  Will start to poke for an owner's manual though, as mice/moisture have made this one close to useless.  I will admit it was fun to knock all the dust off it - thick coat after 35 years or so.

 

We could do some bracket racing with the high wheelers on Friday morning. :)

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)

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a) Remember when I had a VW Westphalia. If you came across another you could have an impromptu drag race and never break the speed limit.

b ) Since if you go a half mile in any direction from my house you are on a 40+ road, I consider 100cc the minimum. I have an '86 (qualifies for AACA) Honda "Spacy". 150cc liquid cooled and progenitor for all the Chinese ripoffs with CVTs.

spacy.jpg

 

 

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Standard comment back in the dark days of Harley was buy two, one to ride and the second for parts.  Also keep the boxes as they leaked oil that bad.

 

Fortunately Harley is light years better now than in those years.

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On ‎9‎/‎16‎/‎2016 at 10:14 AM, Restorer32 said:

Wild turkeys are soon becoming a nuisance here as well.

 

Here north of Detroit, it is the deer.  They are everywhere.  Just over grown rats that eat everything.  I live in a suburban setting and it is nothing to see groups of 6-8 walking through the back yard, front yard, standing in the street, everywhere just munching on all of the landscaping.  They are awful.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

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My problem was jeeps.  One wandered into my lane of travel and we collided with me doing 45mph and the jeep doing 10mph.  I lost the standoff so be ware of jeeps too.  Suzukis and jeeps do not mix.

 

Terry

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We live next to a reservoir surrounded by woods and corn and soy bean fields. Deer are a constant problem. We've seen up to 25 in one group. We used to have a mulberry tree that overhung our deck. Deer would climb up on the deck to get to the young mulberry buds. When we had horses they would come in the barn and steal the horses' grain and hay.

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