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BUICK TRUCKS


Guest imported_MrEarl

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Guest imported_MrEarl

I am starting a new thread called Buick Trucks. I am not that knowledgeable of them so hopefully everyone will chime in with their opinions of years, whether they are original or modified autos etc etc.

1910 Bakery Delivery

13028bakery1-med.jpg

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Just went last weekend and seen two in OH a 1913 and a 1915. the 13 had been restored and very nice I might add. The 15 is in need of resto. There is a 1910 I believe in the truck museum in Auburn IN. It looks like a buckboard wagon with a 2 cyl motor slung underneath. Yhe Buick trucks were special built for the most part, different from the cars. Different chassis mainly.. There were three or four trucks at the centenial in Flint.

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Not sure the year or model, but the second photo is fire truck, which is very cool. you can see the "D.F.D" (or is it a G?) on the hood, that would stand for Dallas Fire Department or something like that. It's the Fire Chief's car (says Chief on the door, probably that's the Chief driving it judging by his hat). You can see the "federal" siren mounted up top (makes the longgggg wailing sound that we all recognize). Extra spotlights also mounted up top for lighting up the "scene". There's a few fire extinguishers mounted outboard, and a larger tank or something behind the driver. Odd that a Chiefs vehicle has any fire fighting equipment on board, but apparently it does in this case. They appear to be parked outside the fire house, as the two large brick bay doors would be the exits for the vehicles, sleeping quarters overhead.

So this is a neat old photo of the Fire Chief of some fire department receiving his new vehicle. Probably the mayor and such with him for the photo op.

Cool Lamar!

Budd

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It sure would be interesting to find out where the first "D" in DFD stood for. It would appear this was the chief's car and also the first response, being a Buick and faster then the bigger trucks. The tank is likely what was know as a chemical much like an older water fire extinguisher that operated on a Soda-Acid method, where a small bottle of sulfuric acid would be mixed into a water and sodium bicarbonate solution with the water. The mixing created pressure that expelled the water. That is why you either had to invert the portable extinguisher or hit a plunger to activate the system. The small tank would have had a plunger ( as rather heavy to invert a tank fixed to the vehicle), that would allow possible a 50-100 gallon of water to be dispelled without the use of a pump. There were even larger units on the bigger trucks and you may have heard of the expression "chemical engines" in use for such units. They were not for chemical fires.

I wonder how many old fire fighters around remember these?

John

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Guest imported_MrEarl

John, here is the link to the photograph that is on ebay. The seller seems to think the D is an O and that it is possibly in Orlando, Florida. Doesn't look like what I ever thought Orlando looked like in that era though.

ebay fire truck

Norb those are some great Buick truck ads.You must have an awesome collection of Buick memorobilia. THANK YOU for sharing!!!

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Lamar, another thing that happened back in the 40's was truck conversions. When WWII began all new car production ceased in 42. Everything was rationed, including gas. Farmers with trucks could get more gas than anyone one else, to haul produce and so forth. But when the old truck broke down what to do? Many sedans gave their lives to become trucks back then. There was a 26 Buick up on Ebay last year. From the pics it looked like they had done a good job of putting the cab together. It even had a "T" sticker in the window for gas rationing.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Mr. Earl has suggested that I add the photos of the Buick Tow Truck that was photographed at a Turlock, California swap meet several years ago. The consensus is that the vehicle began life as a Model 72 four-door (Riviera) sedan, possibly a 1951 model that has been fitted with a 1950 grille and hood.

truckft.jpg

truckrr.jpg

50rocket.jpg

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No discussion of Buick trucks would be complete without mention of Paul Meyer's "Mimi", which is a 1942 Buick Model 90 converted by the Buick factory into a pickup truck. Many of you saw this vehicle at Flint or at other BCA events. The story is that Edward T. Ragsdale, Buick's manufacturing manager (and, later, general manager), named the vehicle after his daughter, whose name appears in chrome script lettering on both sides of the vehicle.

paulmeyer.jpg

mimi.jpg

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Guest imported_MrEarl

I seem to recall that the truck was used at some point for giving tours on an estate/farm or something. I believe there were bench seats along the back so the rails were probably designed more for function than aesthetics or beauty.I may be 100% wrong here but that's how I heard it.....

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Now THAT is beautiful!

If it werern't for the left hand steering, I'd guess it was a "ute" type vehicle which was, and still is produced and sold in Australia, NZ, etc, of which stateside we have no equivalent. {maybe the foreign plates are unduly influencing me?} Any other info on it?

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Mr. Earl, just caught this thread for the first time. The Buick firetruck appears to be a 1924-45. It has high pressure tires and Buick went to balloons

in 1925. The headlight shells are painted black where as a model 55 would be nickel plated. I don't think it's a model 49. The 49 has a different steering

wheel and this looks like the regular one as best that I can tell. Did anyone on this thread get this picture off ebay? bubba

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I still remember the incredible job someone did on a 1970 El Camino, replacing the hood, fenders, bumber, dash and seats from a Gran Sport. It was at the annual meeting in Columbus a few years ago.

I'd still like to own that truck! Wonder what a 2005 or 2006 Buick Lacrosse would look like converted into an El Camino-styled vehicle? Sort of a smaller, more affordable and fuel efficient Cadillac Escalade?

Hey, anyone at GM listening?????

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Guest imported_MrEarl

I confess, I borrowed it for the purpose of posting it here. I often bid on these but man, old automoblie pictures can go sky high. Thanks for the info re the truck. Please share more info on old trucks if you have it. Thanks,

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Guest imported_MrEarl

I think the one you described was at Flint too. I took a picture of it but it was on one of the three rolls that I lost on the show grounds that day. I'm still crying over that and would love to have them.

Be sure and take some before and after shots of that Lacrosse you converting. grin.gif

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Mr. Earl - am delighted to find this thread on Buick Trucks! It's an underappreciated aspect of Buick. There's a feature story about Buick Trucks at http://www.prewarbuick.com/id173.htm. The pictures you show are terrific! What a shame Buick dropped out of the truck market. (You have no doubt seen the 1938 Buick "El Camino" for lack of a better term; it's handsome, elegant as any good Buick, and pratical too.)

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Mr. Earl I'm reviving your Truck thread, as I went garagevisting at a member of the Danish Buickclub, and I took some pictures of his 1915 Fire truck that I thought you might like to see.

1915-Buick-Firetruck.jpg

1915-Buick-Firetruck-engine.jpg

1915-Buick-Firetruck-radiator.jpg

It's a very beautiful truck, as you can see from the pictures. After seeing this one, every big boy in the garage that day, wanted to be a firefighter smile.gif

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The firetruck was in a museum in Ohio until the late 80's, if I remember correctly. I believe it changed hands a couple of times over here until it ended up at this collector.

I think Martin Andersen is a member of the BCA, he has in his collection about 20 Buicks with a 1908 being the oldest, and 1958 the newest !!

here's another small treat for ya'll -> Wolf whistle (you will need realplayer to view)

Have fun !

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