ckowner

1930 DeSoto CK6 Coupe

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CKowner,

 

My 1931 Sedan came from the factory painted black. I've just begun the restoration process and first thought was to paint the body dark blue, something dark but not black, but after seeing the color of your coupe I'm rethinking that. What is the name of your body color. You mentioned it was called a brown, but looks like a pale green on my monitor. Anyway I think it may be just what I'm looking for.

 

 

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The paint is a urethane enamel, base/clear. PPG brown. FBCH209140. PPG has 2 color chips almost identical, but one contains yellow pigment and one contains red pigment. That changes the way it looks with other colors. Certains reds, like the wheels look great with this color and others do not. Hope this helps. Years ago I thought I would paint the chocolate/yellow colors that were common, but this color is not trendy and receives many compliments.A little more exciting than dark blue and black. My original colors as well,

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Great car. I would like to know what type of roof covering will you use? Do you have any pictures of cover yet. I am restoring my truck and would appreciate any information. Thanks

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On 5/31/2017 at 0:31 AM, ckowner said:

The paint is a urethane enamel, base/clear. PPG brown. FBCH209140. PPG has 2 color chips almost identical, but one contains yellow pigment and one contains red pigment. That changes the way it looks with other colors. Certains reds, like the wheels look great with this color and others do not. Hope this helps. Years ago I thought I would paint the chocolate/yellow colors that were common, but this color is not trendy and receives many compliments.A little more exciting than dark blue and black. My original colors as well,

 

When I purchased my 31 Chevy as a basket case, the PO had painted the hood the creamy yellow and the front fenders the reddish brown seen in the picture. Because the PO's widow gave me a great deal on the price, I decided to stay with the colors she had originally picked. The colors are actually 31 Chevy code 81, fawn brown, coffee cream, and swamp holly orange. Looking at the paperwork I got with the car, the coffee cream was easy, 79 Mercedes desert tan was a perfect match. The wheels were also painted so I didn't need the orange. Now, the reddish brown was a problem even after it was scanned. Looking at my paperwork again. I found more numbers for yellow paint but nothing for the brown. The PO had used DuPont chromapremier and I went to the local DuPont dealer. When I told him my problem and only having yellow numbers he said "our yellows are not necessarily yellows, but can be browns"! I gave him the numbers I had and while flipping through his chip book, I'm watching the yellows changing to browns the closer we got to my number. I had also found a note with the number that showed some grams of black and red oxide added to 32oz. Sure enough, that yellow paint ended up being the right color and with the pigment mods, yielded the "Georgia red mud" color I needed.

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After seeing your restoration on your 30 DeSoto, I am speechless!  I've never seen a car go from a farmer's yard with a tree growing through it, to your finished car.  I love DeSoto's and want to get a 29-33 DeSoto to compliment my 48 DeSoto business coupe.  You must be the Leonardo Da Vinci of antique car restoration!!!  Marc.

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Thanks for the compliments Marc. I have been complimented on my patience, but somehow I never felt that myself. It was always a challenge to get to the next step.

Rick

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Looking at the date of the last post, It has more than a year and a half. Some how these projects just keep going. Almost a year ago I was contacted by someone looking for some parts. As a result of the conversation I ended up with an actual DeSoto luggage trunk that had been stored in his basement for 40 years.After shipping it from Ontario to the west coast, I dismantled and had a body man bring the metal to its original shape and contour. It appears that the corner of the trunk suffered some collision damage. 

The aluminum moldings which were crimped over steel strips to resemble the old belting were removed and I replaced them by gluing polished stainless straps in their place with epoxy. I got the old locks unfrozen and working again. Even found a key that worked.:)

 

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Posted (edited)

A new challenge to work on. Mounting the trunk so it can be removed easily. I had a friend machine 4 pieces of aluminum to fit the corners of the luggage rack. I threaded the sides to use the existing holes so that drilling new holes in the luggage rack would not be necessary. After lining up the trunk, the holes were then drilled up through the bottom of the trunk. I fabricated threaded knobs and inserted spur nuts in the bottom of the trunk. Bingo!

 

 

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Edited by ckowner (see edit history)

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I had some pictures posted under different "wanted" categories for completion of my sidemount wheel locks. I finally found some of the lock castings with pieces of fender still attached. Where to go from here?

After some effort and time , I did get the parts separated. See before and after

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Posted (edited)

I waited for some time to see if there would be any replies for the pieces or pictures of pieces required to make these complete working locks. There have been no responses, so I put my imagination to work. Since the actual locking was not a required issue, this was my answer to the problem. Since the hole in the opposite side of the fender well was not a straight line with the holes in the lock, the pin had to be bent or flexible. After much searching, I found a 3/8 flexible socket drive. I drilled out the 3/8 square drive end and tapped it with a 1/2" NF tap. Inserted a brass threaded reducer into the lock casting and drilled and tapped a 1/2" solid brass plug with the 1/2" NF tap as well. After a day with minimal tools and some searching and imagination, this was the result. Pictures coming. My files are too big!

Edited by ckowner (see edit history)
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These are the finished products. I installed some heat shrink tubing over the bare metal parts, and put thread locker on the threads that were intended to not come apart. The old fastening rivets in the cast were drilled out, and since the hole were too big to thread to !/4" , I cut the heads off of 1/4" stainless bolts and epoxied the studs in the hole for mounting. I hope the purist approve of my solution, but I could not think of another practical solution

Enjoy!

Rick VanOene

1930 DeSoto CK6 rumble seat coupe (Canadian)

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I am in the process of having some leather handles made for the steamer car trunk so that is can actually be carried when removed from the car. Then it will have to be disassembled and painted. I will share pictures when completed. In the mean time I am still in need of on wheel clamp as shown. Part# 72009. I will see if a reproduction can be machine or cast, since I do have one to copy

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Sorry missed your want . Here is pic of pieces . I can gladly bend you a rod . It simply in pinned in latch you drilled cylinder out of . The pinning is with a wobble to aid installing . Finding a lock would be hardest . Have seen some that may work . Can probably do something operable with screw driver . Ignore round plate and nut . I have pic of proper wing nut if wanted .

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Hi Tom

Thanks for the pictures. Are any of those parts for sale? or are they some of your file pictures?

regards

Rick

 

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No thats from my truck . Had off to free lock . And send clamp out to have copies made few years ago . All are sold . i will gladly trace bend piece for you and mail ,send me pm with post address .

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I am in the process of having a new clamp cast. Should be ready in about 2 weeks. As for the locks and cylinders, I will stick with what I have for now. The only hope of getting a replacement lock/pin, would be if some would show up in an old automotive warehouse parts cache. Thanks for your help.

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Picked up the handles from the shoe maker. 1/4" thick, 2 layers sewn together. Made the stainless straps and mounted the handles. Now it can be carried when removed from the car.

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Got a call from the foundry today. The casting of my side mount wheel clamp was finished. A perfect copy of the one I have. I was impressed and soooo happy! Another thing completed. 

I will be doing some painting and then assembly. The trunk has been stripped of all the hardware and has gone in for paint. My decision was to do the same color as the car. I will be painting the inside with a good durable black marine enamel. 

 

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One more challenge. The weather stripping profile for the trunk lid seal could not be found. I even sent a sample of the original to Steele Rubber. They supplied me with 6' of a similar profile, but smaller. It turned out to be too small on it's own.

Today I found a garage roll up door bottom seal which was made of the same rubber. I cut a strip off and with the help of JB WELD super glue, came close to the profile I need

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I have a question about the body.  Didn't Chrysler advertise that their cars were all steel bodies.  Yet your body has wooden ribs.  Can you explain that?  

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Hi there. The first DeSoto series "K" was basically a car body built  around a wooden structure. It was the wood which held most of the body together. Door were lined with wood to hold the mechanisms, floor boards were wood, etc. 

In 1930 there was a transition where much of the wood structure was replaced with metal stampings. Doors and cowls were all steel, the trunk/rumble lid still had wood lining, floor boards on closed  model cars were steel (except for the front removable section). The 1930 roadster still had all wood floorboards. The 1930 DeSoto CF bodies were called "mono piece" bodies. and were said to be all steel construction. I do not have all the details on the body building progress of Chrysler products, but I believe the big " all steel body" advertising came into being with the 1934 Airflow, where Chrysler showed one being rolled down an embankment and then driven away. 

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Some real progress has been made in the last few weeks. The luggage trunk has been painted, and all the hardware attached. I made a bracket to mount the third rumble seat step, which I had, onto the bumper bracket. The spare tire clamps have been painted and installed. Took it for about a 10 mile drive on Monday. Today it would not start!

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