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Garage & Car Barn Thread


alsancle
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Posted (edited)

Twenty years ago, I built my home and purposely didn’t build my barn on site. I had a 8K square foot shop three miles away. I knew someday I would want to sell the house, but not the shop. Last month, I sold the shop. The house is next. Interestingly I never thought I would ever sell either one. You never know where life will take you. For myself, I’m going to retire up at the Gilmore Museum in Hickory Corners.  I will be less than five miles from never ending car shows. This time, I will build a small shop and storage area, as I don’t plan to do any extra work except maintain my meager collection. I will have extra storage and an RV hook up for friends who will be touring in Michigan. I’m half way to having my new place in the wilds of Michigan, and it feels good to get away from the left coast with all the moonbats. Now it’s time to start collecting antique snowmobiles! No regrets, just turn the page, and keep having fun.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Twenty years ago, I built my home and purposely didn’t build my barn on site. I had a 8K square foot shop three miles away. I knew someday I would want to sell the house, but not the shop. Last month, I sold the shop. The house is next. Interestingly I never thought I would ever sell either one. You never know where life will take you. For myself, I’m going to retire up at the Gilmore Museum in Hickory Corners.  I will be less than five miles from never ending car shows. This time, I will build a small shop and storage area, as I don’t plan to do any extra work except maintain my meager collection. I will have extra storage and an RV hook up for friends who will be touring in Michigan. I’m half way to having my new place in the wilds of Michigan, and it feels good to get away from the left coast with all the moonbats. Now it’s time to start collecting antique snowmobiles! No regrets, just turn the page, and keep having fun.


Don’t forget keeping my meager collection running.

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Twenty years ago, I built my home and purposely didn’t build my barn on site. I had a 8K square foot shop three miles away. I knew someday I would want to sell the house, but not the shop. Last month, I sold the shop. The house is next. Interestingly I never thought I would ever sell either one. You never know where life will take you. For myself, I’m going to retire up at the Gilmore Museum in Hickory Corners.  I will be less than five miles from never ending car shows. This time, I will build a small shop and storage area, as I don’t plan to do any extra work except maintain my meager collection. I will have extra storage and an RV hook up for friends who will be touring in Michigan. I’m half way to having my new place in the wilds of Michigan, and it feels good to get away from the left coast with all the moonbats. Now it’s time to start collecting antique snowmobiles! No regrets, just turn the page, and keep having fun.

And Hickory Corner is only 98 miles to Auburn. 

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3 minutes ago, John Bloom said:

And Hickory Corner is only 98 miles to Auburn. 


yes........

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Both of these garages have the same exterior dimensions of 36x53 yet they look totally different.  One has a higher roof peak and wall height,  but also more details.

 

 

MortonBuilding36x53.jpg

MortonCarBarn.jpg

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AJ, those are two nice examples to show that all of the details and Trim make a huge difference. Another thing to consider is putting some effort and design and a little bit of money into landscaping. That’s a game changer also.

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5 hours ago, mike6024 said:

 

That's my favorite barn. A real barn that would have a hay loft. Note it is asymmetric. In the movie "The Birds" of course.

 

Historic Point Reyes milk barn where I got to work briefly. It's getting a metal roof and supposedly they will reintroduce some cows after many decades, to this federal parkland. It also has a "stepped" roof but the step is small. I think it required 14 foot long metal panels for the lower section, and 18 for the upper gable portion. If you know what I mean, the lower and upper sections of the roof, below and above the "step" are different lengths.

 

 

Back in my younger dumber days I looked in to the companies that disassemble and rebuild historic barns.   Besides the cost,   there are two other big issues.   No clear span (except for the one I'm sure I posted earlier in this thread) and if you insulate post and beam you lose the character.

 

http://www.vintagewoods.com/barn_frames_available.html

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This is another Morton building I like.   However, an awfully big building for only 4 cars.  At 30'W x 10'H x 56'L the same square footage as the last two red ones I posted, but with a lower side wall height and horizontally positioned a very different look.    The doors, gutters and lights make an otherwise big metal building very attractive - at least to me.

 

https://mortonbuildings.com/projects/jamess-hobby-garage-1

MortonBuilding30x56-1.jpg

MortonBuilding30x56-3.jpg

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Yes, I like that too. The roof overhang, cupolas and very tasteful garage doors give a nice look that doesn’t scream “metal building”.  
 

I have always wanted tall enough sidewalls to allow with the roof pitch an upper level loft area, with vintage pub feel,  that looks down on the display area of cars.  Clearly that puts you into bigger buildings, footprints and cost. 
 

I am always on the lookout for old pubs to stash away for the hopeful future project. I love stuff like this.   I want it to be a working garage on the ground but have a clean area where you can get away from that and relax with friends and talk cars while still able to see them. 

6519B688-C926-420F-A073-C1595128FDAC.png

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5 minutes ago, TAKerry said:

Can never be too big!

 

Truer words never spoken and if I lived out in middle America on 100 acres  I would drop a 60x120 right on

the back 40.     Here in the People's Republic of Suburbia there are sadly other considerations.

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1 minute ago, John Bloom said:

Yes, I like that too. The roof overhang, cupolas and very tasteful garage doors give a nice look that doesn’t scream “metal building”.  
 

I have always wanted tall enough sidewalls to allow with the roof pitch an upper level loft area, with vintage pub feel,  that looks down on the display area of cars.  Clearly that puts you into bigger buildings, footprints and cost. 
 

I am always on the lookout for old pubs to stash away for the hopeful future project. I love stuff like this.   I want it to be a working garage on the ground but have a clean area where you can get away from that and relax with friends and talk cars while still able to see them. 

6519B688-C926-420F-A073-C1595128FDAC.png

 

 

Do you remember "Red Baron Auctions"?   I would get a catalog twice a year.   Always a few crazy bar backs.   The one you pictured would be 30k  but I like where you are going with this.

 

https://www.rbantiques.com/antique-pub-bars-canopy-and-commercial-interiors-structures-panel-rooms-showcases/antique-commercial-bars-and-store-interiors

 

ra564-lead-1920x1080.jpg

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I would love to have a nice big 'man cave' car barn. But my 24 x 40 is ultimately going to be my woodworking shop ( gotta pay the bills somehow). Once the final move is made my old shop 16x32 will be the man cave and home to my motorcycle collection. Now all I need is time to get things moved around and finished.

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23 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

 

Do you remember "Red Baron Auctions"?   I would get a catalog twice a year.   Always a few crazy bar backs.   The one you pictured would be 30k  but I like where you are going with this.

 

https://www.rbantiques.com/antique-pub-bars-canopy-and-commercial-interiors-structures-panel-rooms-showcases/antique-commercial-bars-and-store-interiors

 

ra564-lead-1920x1080.jpg

I know every site that deals in vintage bars and architectural salvage sites that sell vintage bars. I’m always checking them. The really nice old Brunswick bars with 26 foot or longer front and back bars can easily be six figures now. No way I’m doing that, but Periodically I’ll stumble on one fairly Local that needs to be taken out of an old bar. There was a beautiful one up in Wisconsin three years ago for 12 grand that I was a day too late in getting. It was just the back bar but I would’ve been fine with that, it was gorgeous with detail to blow you away.  
 

I have thirty acres of farmland 1.2 miles from our cottage and could build whatever I wanted on it, but I know that even that 1.2 mile drive will be a hindrance to me using the facility as much as if it was on site at my residence.

 

in the end, it may be my default location.

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10 minutes ago, alsancle said:

I think it is hard to combine a man cave with a working shop.   If you are doing real work you are probably making a mess.

 If your shop is big enough you can do it. I'm just finishing a room within the shop for the bar, fireplace, sitting space, listening place, and electric trains layout. So after breakfast it's time for finishing tape and mudding drywall. 

 I still have room for six cars, a office, working space, and a motor room.

 It's absolutely essential to keep the shop part separate like mine if it's a working shop, especially if you are doing any kind of painting. 

    

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1 minute ago, Pfeil said:

 If your shop is big enough you can do it. I'm just finishing a room within the shop for the bar, fireplace, sitting space, listening place, and electric trains layout. So after breakfast it's time for finishing tape and mudding drywall. 

 I still have room for six cars, a office, working space, and a motor room.

 It's absolutely essential to keep the shop part separate like mine if it's a working shop, especially if you are doing any kind of painting. 

    

 

What are your exterior dimensions?   I can't go more than 33x54 ish.   Otherwise I will be demolishing it to sell my house.

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Posted (edited)

Another thing to remember, depending on how you like to display vehicles, using stacking lifts are a value not to be discounted. Much smaller building, less heat and cooling expense, less maintenance, and lower annual tax bills. Twenty years ago, when I built my house, I designed the three car garage to be able to stack and have six parking spaces. When your done with the lifts, they are easy to sell and you recover most of your investment back. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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1 minute ago, edinmass said:

stack and have six parking spaces. 

 

I cant see ever doing this.

If I choose to drive one of my cars I want it available to me right away.

The idea of having to start and move another car to drive the one I choose is counter productive.

On the other hand, if you collect cars that you don't drive ......

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7 minutes ago, JACK M said:

 

I cant see ever doing this.

If I choose to drive one of my cars I want it available to me right away.

The idea of having to start and move another car to drive the one I choose is counter productive.

On the other hand, if you collect cars that you don't drive ......


I will confess to driving more than 99 percent of the people reading this. Moving a car takes less than two minutes. Half are always ready. I drive my 1915 T much less than my Pierce 12. Thus it would go on top. Many places you can’t build large outbuildings, and stacking is a viable option. Where I live in Florida, they stack three high, and have lifts that don’t require to move the floor or mid level car. That style of triple runs about 35k. Still cheaper than a bigger building. And the car is at your house, not in storage five miles away. In the sticks, a larger building is cheaper. 

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1 minute ago, edinmass said:

Where I live in Florida, they stack three high, and have lifts that don’t require to move the floor or mid level car. That style of triple runs about 35k. Still cheaper than a bigger building.

 

I guess I could go with that.

I am in the planning stage of a new storage only building.

Not knowing what the kids will do with my place when I am gone is something to consider.

I have the room and it looks like a 40 x 60 is in the works.

Homes around here don't last long on the open market and the ones that have large out buildings sell before they get listed.

We all have a couple of acres or more and the city folk buy out here and commute into Portland from here. 

That is something I was cured of back in the 70s. I couldn't imagine it now. What I could do in 45 minutes now takes an hour and a half.  X2? no way.

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Our garage was designed for cars. I measured a 19 foot Cadillac (mostly 1950s) about three feet beyond the tail end of the car making 23 feet, then a 3 foot wide tool benches and 4 feet to walk around with a rolling table and room to work on the cars. 30 feet total!


Plenty of room about 15 feet (sideways) for more tool cabinets and storage. Four 12 foot wide roll up doors. 15 wide x 4 figured a 60 foot width. one of the open bays (no lifts) gave plenty of room to install a bathroom.

 

Hmm, height? How high where I could safely raise a car with the hood open. 14 foot eaves and a peak of 16 feet in the middle. Chain hoist.

Two four post lifts (9,000 pounds and extended platform) since we are always hunting parts needed and car can sit on one lift and the other lift kept clear. 

220v outlets for air compressor and welders. One outlet near the roll up door opening so I can easily weld outside. 3 ton HVAC system, a few ceiling fans. Plenty of LED lighting, additional over each tool bench. Media blast cabinet. Chairs for the wife. Outside LED floodlights.

Started with a few stakes and strings. More pictures later.
 

Garage and Museum-11 (Medium).JPG

Garage and Museum-137.jpeg

Garage and Museum-140.jpeg

Garage and Museum-63.jpeg

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  I don't do much work in mine, just polishing and waxing mostly, I had the garage built to hold two Caddys deep and made it high enough to install lifts, the last spot was just filled with a 60 Persian Sand Coupe which I am waiting for delivery of.  They are never big enough.   

empty spot.jpg

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In southern Florida, car storage is a big business. From modern super cars, Mustangs of the 60’s to the 80’s, and English cars like they are going out of style. Basic industrial storage with limited access is 400 a month. Valet premium is 800 plus a month. They are all sold out of space. Most million dollar homes in my neighborhood don’t have garages, and many only have street parking. Two car garages with easy access are commonly rented in my old historic development. The two car garage typically rents for 1500 a month.

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4 hours ago, edinmass said:

In the sticks, a larger building is cheaper. 

Now I know the real advantage of living in the sticks besides not having neighbors so close that you can't use the outdoor restroom with the evergreen urinal.

If you are handy and have a few pieces of equipment laying around,  before the recent surge in building materials you could put up around 4300 square feet with a little style for around $100,000. Of course that's not finished inside or even a floor but did require alot of site work as it has a full foundation.

 

(I really need to get some better photos) 

IMG_7688.JPG

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I have really enjoyed this thread and even posted about my garage and barn.  Thanks to all for sharing your car storage stories.

One thing not covered in this thread so far is Realtors not understanding that garages add value.   10 years ago when we sold our Florida single family home, none of the Realtors would add anything for the value for the 5 car garage, split to 2 attached and 3 detached.   Needless to say we didn't use a Realtor.  Their loss.   Thank goodness for CarProperty.com.

I've always had a problem with Realtors since the 70's when I was a State Farm Agent and Realtors would call for a Homeowners quote and could not be able answer these questions:

What's the square footage?

Frame or masonry?

Electrical,  Fuses or Circuit Breakers?

Roof Shape, Flat, Gable, or Hip?  Material? Age of roof material?

Flood Zone?

Heating System?

# of garage spaces?

Slab or crawl space?

A quote was just a WAG until I inspected the propery and computed the replacement cost.

To car people, garage space is really important, but on the TV Shows like House Hunters, they seldon talk about or

show the inside of garages and out buildings.

Take a look at Carproperty.com, you'll see some great garages!

I appoligize to any Realtors that I offended, but I'm sure you knew what went on around you.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Paul Dobbin said:

I have really enjoyed this thread and even posted about my garage and barn.  Thanks to all for sharing your car storage stories.

One thing not covered in this thread so far is Realtors not understanding that garages add value.   10 years ago when we sold our Florida single family home, none of the Realtors would add anything for the value for the 5 car garage, split to 2 attached and 3 detached.   Needless to say we didn't use a Realtor.  Their loss.   Thank goodness for CarProperty.com.

I've always had a problem with Realtors since the 70's when I was a State Farm Agent and Realtors would call for a Homeowners quote and could not be able answer these questions:

What's the square footage?

Frame or masonry?

Electrical,  Fuses or Circuit Breakers?

Roof Shape, Flat, Gable, or Hip?  Material? Age of roof material?

Flood Zone?

Heating System?

# of garage spaces?

Slab or crawl space?

A quote was just a WAG until I inspected the propery and computed the replacement cost.

To car people, garage space is really important, but on the TV Shows like House Hunters, they seldon talk about or

show the inside of garages and out buildings.

Take a look at Carproperty.com, you'll see some great garages!

I appoligize to any Realtors that I offended, but I'm sure you knew what went on around you.

 

 

 

It is funny you should mention this,  because I'll see a property listed in MLS and you can see some great out building in the background photos and they don't talk about or even show any real pictures of it.  I always thought that was strange.  

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10 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

What are your exterior dimensions?   I can't go more than 33x54 ish.   Otherwise I will be demolishing it to sell my house.

36X48 and two stacking lifts. House has a three car garage for two daily drivers and one collectable.

BTW, stacking lifts are the cheapest way to add square footage in a limited space if you have the height, and if you are a car guy a great way to save your back.

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On 7/1/2021 at 6:50 AM, alsancle said:

This is a great video if you are considering a Morton Building.   This guy is a lunatic who collects buses,  and he walks through the entire process of building a BIG Morton building to hold the two of them.   There is little finish work, but the whole project cost 100k ish 2 years ago.   I'm sure those prices have gone way up.

 

 

 

 

 

Same guy just did a follow up video of what it cost and the process of insulating his building.   Spoiler alert:   Morton wanted 30k,  He did it for much less on his own.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Now I know the real advantage of living in the sticks besides not having neighbors so close that you can't use the outdoor restroom with the evergreen urinal.

If you are handy and have a few pieces of equipment laying around,  before the recent surge in building materials you could put up around 4300 square feet with a little style for around $100,000. Of course that's not finished inside or even a floor but did require alot of site work as it has a full foundation.

 

(I really need to get some better photos) 

IMG_7688.JPG

 

My mind boggles about how much that building would cost around here. Around $80 K { Canadian } for a triple garage / shop is what I am hearing in my area. Both labor and materials are nut's around here these days. That's of course in an area where land value is up there with almost any place you can imagine outside of L.A. or New York city. You are a very lucky man !

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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On 7/3/2021 at 7:34 AM, alsancle said:

 

 

Same guy just did a follow up video of what it cost and the process of insulating his building.   Spoiler alert:   Morton wanted 30k,  He did it for much less on his own.

 

 

Yes it was cheaper than quoted but he didnt do the ceilings (or metal liner) which is much more labor intensive, plus he wasnt paying for labor, workers comp., overhead on the company trucks, etc. Always much cheaper for a homeowner to do the job.  Nice looking building, but it didnt look like enough truss bracing.  That would never pass in my county. We need to put about as much additional bracing as is in the trusses themselves! I like the tip about getting leftovers from the building company. We specialized in erecting steel buildings and I was able to salvage enough extra insulation from a few that we put together to fully insulate my 24 x 40 x 14. Guys were calling me Sanford when I put all of the extra in a pile to go home. They thought I was silly.

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20 minutes ago, TAKerry said:

Yes it was cheaper than quoted but he didnt do the ceilings (or metal liner) which is much more labor intensive, plus he wasnt paying for labor, workers comp., overhead on the company trucks, etc. Always much cheaper for a homeowner to do the job.  Nice looking building, but it didnt look like enough truss bracing.  That would never pass in my county. We need to put about as much additional bracing as is in the trusses themselves! I like the tip about getting leftovers from the building company. We specialized in erecting steel buildings and I was able to salvage enough extra insulation from a few that we put together to fully insulate my 24 x 40 x 14. Guys were calling me Sanford when I put all of the extra in a pile to go home. They thought I was silly.


Those are good points and I thought to myself after watching the video I would have had Morton do it. My building would be half as big so hopefully we are talking 15k and not 30.

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