Recommended Posts

Changing the subject ever so slightly I have only just been sent the attached photographs of another of my Lagonda Rapiers.

With winter just around the corner for all those in the northern hemisphere you may enjoy this one of Helen and the Rapier on a very frosty morning.

 

Bernie j.

Winter wonderland, Helen & KG  make a brief stop during the aptly named VSCC of A %22Frostbite Run%22 One of the rare occassions that we see KG with the hood erected..jpg

 

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello 

Not a great deal happening on the Humber right now, Work is progressing on the engine and I spent an hour or so at Crankshaft Rebuilders discussing what action should be taken with various components. I also took the foot brake shoes to be relined (both of them). The foot brake works externally on a drum directly behind the gear box. Rather than a contracting band as seen on early American rear wheels, the Humber has a pair of shoes that are pulled onto the outside of the drum. Sorry no photo at present. My "brake man" still has a small stock of woven linings and will use some of that rather than modern moulded material although he will bond the lining to the shoes, it seems that no one uses rivets these days.

To help with my depression, I spent an hour or two doing some cost projections. You really do not want to know but I would be interested to hear what you think the finished cost should be?

 

Bj

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finished cost will be 36 skinned knuckles, 12 backaches, 64 cuts, 13 bruises, 112 hours of frustration, and countless hours of satisfaction resulting from bringing a unique car back from an almost certain death. All of this will equate to many hours of joyous motoring by you and your wife. 

 

This experience can't be measured in monetary amounts, so adding up the money expenditure is not worth doing. :)

Edited by r1lark (see edit history)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only quantify driving in Smiles per Mile. The rest is irrelevant, unless you become a Schlumpf.

 

jp 26 Rover 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I probably have driven more old car miles than almost anyone reading this and I probably could still be classified as a Schlumpf although I would not want to swap places with either of the brothers.

We visited the "Schlumpf Collection" in the 1970s shortly after the "workers" took over. I doubt very few of you even know what I am talking about.

Unfortunately I do not have  a lavishly equipped workshop so I have to send a lot of the detailed machining work out. I have yet to meet the person who runs a machine shop who will work for "smiles". You will have to introduce me to some of these wonderfully generous people. 

Like anyone trying to live on an age pension I do have to be careful where and how I spend my money. In truth I am probably mad even trying to restore cars at all.

Perhaps I should stop now while I am in front. I could save a lot of time by giving this forum a miss for a start.

I doubt that any of you know what it is to be truly impecunious!

 

Bernie Jacobson

an Impecunious Enthusiast.

 

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can find a copy of it look at  Denis Jenkinson & Peter Verstappen's "The Schlumph Obsession" I have a copy on my bookshelf but it does not leave the room.  isbn 0 600 382275 3

 

There  are  a few on EBAY why not grab a  copy.

 

Bj

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, oldcar said:

I doubt that any of you know what it is to be truly impecunious!

Well, I for one had to look this word up!  Impecunious = having little or no money

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, r1lark said:

Finished cost will be 36 skinned knuckles, 12 backaches, 64 cuts, 13 bruises, 112 hours of frustration, and countless hours of satisfaction resulting from bringing a unique car back from an almost certain death. All of this will equate to many hours of joyous motoring by you and your wife. 

 

This experience can't be measured in monetary amounts, so adding up the money expenditure is not worth doing. :)

 

  I agree. The fisherman does not worry about the cost per fish. MUCH cheaper at the meat market. The climber does not count the cost per foot of progress. You get the idea. 

 

  On the other hand, I KNOW where Bernie is coming from.  I think I am kinda sorta like something I read somewhere. "I want to have just enough to get there with. I want to bounce the check to the undertaker". Something like that. 

 

  Bernie, if I lived in your neighborhood, I would be honored to rub shoulders with you.

 

  Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Ben I am glad that you understand.

Regarding the Hobby Fisherman stuff, I have on my shelf an antique fishing reel, it belonged to my father, I NEVER in my entire life saw him use it, like so many hopefulls he simply gave up out of frustration.

For every succesful angler, there are dozens, if not hundreds, who never catch a bl--dy fish!

 

Paul, after more than 60 years of playing with old cars I think know all about the cuts, bruises and abrasions. I know about the frustrations too. I also know all the pontifications that are regularly trotted out and they don't make one iota of difference.

I have spent a lifetime of being critical of "gunners" and the people who leave abandoned projects to lie rotting is sheds and I absolutely hate the prospect of becoming one of them. I am determined not to allow this to happen.

In the past I have always kept a running total of every cent spent on a restoration. It may please you to learn that with the Humber I am making a point of not doing this.

The one thing I can promise you, there is just one thing that will prevent me from finishing it.

 

I will leave you to work that one out!

 

Bernie j.

 

Finally Ben

I have worked out a way to completely cheat the Undertaker, My cadaver is to go to the Anatomy Department at the Medical School of the Melbourne University. After three years they dispose of any unwanted remains in the local incinerator.

 

Bj.

 

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to be on the safe side I thought that I should check with the University that I was still on their 'waiting list". 

I have received a very prompt reply, saying that all was OK but to be on the safe side that they would update my details.

They have a slab available any time I need it, but there is no need to rush.

You can tell your Undertaker friends, I won't need to be measured for a box, no matter how plain or fancy.

Some eager young student can have  fun trying to find out what made me tick. 

I  don't want to tempt fate but I was told 12 years ago that the Cancer surgery I was about to have performed would give me another five years.

(see also:- Neo-bladder)

 

Bernie j.

Humber.jpeg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/25/2016 at 2:04 AM, oldcar said:

I probably have driven more old car miles than almost anyone reading this and I probably could still be classified as a Schlumpf although I would not want to swap places with either of the brothers.

We visited the "Schlumpf Collection" in the 1970s shortly after the "workers" took over. I doubt very few of you even know what I am talking about.

Unfortunately I do not have  a lavishly equipped workshop so I have to send a lot of the detailed machining work out. I have yet to meet the person who runs a machine shop who will work for "smiles". You will have to introduce me to some of these wonderfully generous people. 

Like anyone trying to live on an age pension I do have to be careful where and how I spend my money. In truth I am probably mad even trying to restore cars at all.

Perhaps I should stop now while I am in front. I could save a lot of time by giving this forum a miss for a start.

I doubt that any of you know what it is to be truly impecunious!

 

Bernie Jacobson

an Impecunious Enthusiast.

 

 

That is why I returned to building models after I completed my '34 Chevy. They cost less, they use less room, the parts are nowhere near as heavy, less bruising and aches. If it doesn't run who cares. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Pat. 

I am sorry Model Making is simply not for me. I don't have the skill or patience to make proper scale models and when it comes to gluing all those little bits of pastic together, forget it.

I have one very good friend with a room absolutely full of unfinished models and about  100+ unopended boxes of all sorts of kits.

Out in the garage he has an unfinished Lotus Europa, an unfinished Porsche, two unfinished Alfa Romeos, an unfinished Lagonda, in another garage he has an unfinished Jaguar and an unfinished Fornula Junior race car. I really don't know but there are sure to be some things that I don't know about. He is currently building an extension on his shed to house more unfinished cars that I don't know about. Oh yes! he lives in an unfinished house. He is a great guy but I would not want to be him.

I could never subscribe to your theory that "no one cares if it does not run". I have just proved that wrong. I care about my own project car and about when it will be finished so that I can drive it. I have always thought that is  why we restore cars, so we can drive them.

I don't really care what may be dozens of people reading this think.

 

I care! and that is what matters to me.

All too soon I will have finished my life  and then it will be too late. Below is just a small sample starting with a 1938 Morris 8hp built when I was 18 or 19 years old, 60 years ago! Believe it or not at that time the Morris was my every day transport.

 

Bernie j

Morris 8 hp. Special077.jpg

 

Rapier at Sandown 1980. 1.jpeg

 

Helen & Bernie on tour  with the1934  Lagonda Rapier. R012.jpg

Singer 8 hp.809.jpg

Mowog Spl Mk 2 804.jpg

Winton 1982 -027_g6it26.png

1931 Austin 12-Six002.jpg

SS Jag 3066.jpg

1922 Citroen 5 cv.004.jpg

1926 Morris Cowley003.jpg

Crossley 3 Litre 1.jpg

Tiny Tot 3:4 Front .jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Ben

Was that a question, a greeting or an instruction?

Either way thank you for your on-going interest.

If it was a question; the answer would be invariably yes.  Restoring vintage cars has been an ongoing influence in my life. To say that I have enjoyed every minute would be telling a lie, there are always some frustrations in every restoration but that can be said of every facet of life.

Believe it or not I have fun writing these posts for the Forum. I like to think that I have made some real friends through the AACA, I just hope that I do not disappoint too many. I would be first to admit that at times I can be a little volatile but I usually calm down just as quickly. I cannot see any point in harbouring grudges. There is definitely no fun in that. 

Every project has its challenges and the Humber is certainly not lacking in that department but then every challenge met and overcome is a reason to keep going. It is all part of the FUN.

 

Bj

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not only but also!

Looking at the collection displayed above I realise that there some other interesting cars that you may like to see.

No prizes but how many can you recognise? If I go looking I am sure I could find some more but that is probably more than enough. One car appears twice but in different clothes. The fabric bodied  Dodge Four second from the top was built as a "nose thumbing" exercise aimed at 3 and 4.5 Litre  Bentley owners. It was  known as the "Le Mans" Dodge. I hope that you can see the likeness. The bottom car was the first Lagonda Rapier I have owned. As with all the others with the exception of the Sunbeam Talbot (EY 245) it was rebuilt from "basket cases" .

Unknown.jpeg

Le Mans Dodge Side view 1.jpg

Sunbeam Talbot DHC 4.jpg

1924 Side Valve Riley069.jpg

Singer Peugeot 4.jpg

 

Flying Four130.jpg

Singer 9..jpeg

Packard 6.jpeg

Singer 9. 1.jpeg

Lagonda LAGOOO 1.jpeg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An amazing record of your adventures! I definitely admire the "one at a time" philosophy. Budget has always held me to one "fun" car at a time, but knowing how I tend to act when too many things are pulling at me, that limitation has kept the hobby enjoyable. Looking forward to the further Humber installments.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Zipdang

I am pleased to find at least one other person who sticks to the one  "fun" car at a time policy. I have neither space or funds to endulge myself any further but even if I did that would not change anything.

I despair when I talk to people who claim to be "collectors" who never do anything constructive with their cars. I was speaking with one such person earlier today. He lives on 28 acres so has plenty of space, provided he does not mind that his collection is slowly sinking into the ground. Either that or simply rusting away. He may fool himself that he is saving the numerous cars spread about his property but already most of them are beyond rescue. By the time he reaches my age they will have all but disappeared. I don't know about other parts of the world but I can think of any number of people with "collections" such as this. Changing the subject ever so slightly I was taken yesterday to a "Specialist Collector Car Wholesaler". Among the dozens and dozens of Porsches, Ferraris etc etc I was shown an early E Type Jaguar with just 14,000 miles recorded  on the speedo. I was told that it would be a crime to drive it any further!

What a total waste of a car and yet I was told that it was probably one of the most expensive Jaguars in the World with a price tag that ran into the Millions & Millions. It had not been started in the last several years! The one consolation was, that by now, if started it would drive like a dog.

Never mind! 

It is appreciating faster than Stocks & Shares or Real Estate and much faster than money in the Bank.

 

Woweeee!!!

Pardon me while I go over into the corner to be sick.

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sick ? So sorry , World Class Cruiser , Bernie. Perhaps this will help with your recovery ! If you , like many here have seen this before , just let me assure you that if I had a Ferrari GTO , a Bugatti Royale , "THE" Bucciali , an SJ Duesenberg, etc. , I would have them out on a remote lonely road , as would you. Unlike your magnificent restorations , this old Cad is an unrestored original. Some admonished me against starting a 5000 mile trip (only about 1/2 the miles , the outbound leg so far). "A reference standard museum piece ! Don't drive it !". I included a pic from what would be your driving position , on your side of the road. Hope it puts a healthy smile on your distinguished face ! Thank you so very much for sharing your skills , creations , point of view , and life lessons with us. I am almost as old as you , and have been having long distance road adventures since I was a toddler in the '40s. My parents were long distance car campers , and I carried on. CARRY ON , ESTEEMED BROTHER !  - Carl

 

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

Edited by C Carl
Spelling corrections so far noticed (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Carl

While you are still a comparative youngster I like your attitude. The Cad must be a fantastic touring car although the steering may be a little on the heavy side (at parking speed) it must simply eat up those long straight roads. As you already appreciate, I am a little "strange" in that I love "little" cars. I also have a "thing" about climbing alpine passes. Many of my "peers" consider me to be decidedly odd, because of my passion for saving "lost causes" and "basket cases" projects that I am told only a lunatic would attempt. All the cars shown on my previous post with the exception of one (mentioned) fitted this description. (it was only slightly scruffy) Unfortunately I do not have "before" photographs for all of them. 

Certainly the 1912 Humber is typical having been dismantled in the late 1950s or early 60s. Before a lot of the people reading this were born.

 

Bernie j.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Work on the Humber continues although much of it is mind numbingly boring stuff like replacing the oilseals in the rear hubs and wire brushing the rust off the hubcap. At present I am locked in a battle to remove the foot brake drum from the rear of the gearbox. It has resisted all the convential methords of persuasion and I need to design and make a suitable, one use only, puller to remove it. The Humber design engineers in 2012 had a distrust of Woodruf Keys and almost invariably used two at every application

DSCN5264.jpg

DSCN5265.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Humber uses Humber's own pattern centre lock wire spoke wheels which used a peg drive rather than a Rudge-Whitworth type splined hub. The Hub caps ALL have a right hand thread and to prevent them from coming loose the hub caps incorportated a spring loaded peg which engages in the coarse castellations around the outside of the wheel centre. The hubcaps have a large raised hexagon and the wheel wrench is basically a large ring spanner which has a humb operated lever which depresses the spring loaded peg to enable the hubcap to be removed. It is remarkable that the wheel wrench had remained with the "car" despite its long period of hibernation. The photographs hopefully are self explanatory.

DSCN5277.jpg

DSCN5269.jpg

DSCN5276.jpg

DSCN5273.jpg

DSCN5270.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going back to my earlier post, the expression "Basket Case" goes back to WW1, at a time when the Humber was new. This  describes victims of shell fire when the stretcher bearers (medics) were said to require a large basket in which to collect all the body parts.

This is typical of how I start a new project, a 1929 Singer Junior.

1929 Singer Junior Day One .jpg

1929 Singer Junior_3.jpg

 

Singer Junior 5.JPG

Body Start_1.JPG

Body 30.9.13_2.JPG

_Body 30:9:13 1.JPG

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great pics on some of your other cars Bernie. You definitely are a man that thrives on challenges!

 

I was also impressed at the engineering on the Humber hubs and caps, and still amazed that the collection of parts remained together all those years. For example, the special wrench that removes the caps -- not something you come across every day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...