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Hello Again Paul

I too am impressed with the engineering to be found throughout the Humber. It is the first pre WW1 car I have owned and I find working on it fascinating. I find it interesting to see how they went about problem solving when these things were still in their formative years. Regarding the hub-cap wrench. While looking at it, it is a nice & simple solution to a tricky problem, the thought of having to design and make that from scratch is something else! 

It is details like this that continue to excite my imagination and continues to 'drive' me.

 

Bernie j.

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On 11/29/2016 at 1:49 AM, oldcar said:

Thank you Pat. 

I am sorry Model Making is simply not for me. I don't have the skill or patience to make proper scale models and when it comes to gluing all those little bits of pastic together, forget it.

I have one very good friend with a room absolutely full of unfinished models and about  100+ unopended boxes of all sorts of kits.

Out in the garage he has an unfinished Lotus Europa, an unfinished Porsche, two unfinished Alfa Romeos, an unfinished Lagonda, in another garage he has an unfinished Jaguar and an unfinished Fornula Junior race car. I really don't know but there are sure to be some things that I don't know about. He is currently building an extension on his shed to house more unfinished cars that I don't know about. Oh yes! he lives in an unfinished house. He is a great guy but I would not want to be him.

I could never subscribe to your theory that "no one cares if it does not run". I have just proved that wrong. I care about my own project car and about when it will be finished so that I can drive it. I have always thought that is  why we restore cars, so we can drive them.

I don't really care what may be dozens of people reading this think.

 

I care! and that is what matters to me.

All too soon I will have finished my life  and then it will be too late. Below is just a small sample starting with a 1938 Morris 8hp built when I was 18 or 19 years old, 60 years ago! Believe it or not at that time the Morris was my every day transport.

 

Bernie j

What I meant here Bernie is no one cares if a scale model doesn't run. real cars is another story. I've just spent most of the summer getting my '34 Chevrolet to run the way I'd like it to.

 

On 11/29/2016 at 1:49 AM, oldcar said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hello Again,

I  am impressed with the engineering to be found throughout the Humber. It is the first pre WW1 car I have owned and I find working on it fascinating. I find it interesting to see how they went about problem solving when these things were still in their formative years.

For instance that hub-cap wrench. While looking at it, it is a nice & simple solution to a tricky problem, the thought of having to design and make that from scratch is something else! 

It is details like this that continue to excite my imagination and continue to 'drive' me.

While I appreciate the things that keep some other people busy and their minds active, model making is just not for me.  I guess as we all (well, at least some of us) are getting older, any activity is better that sitting doing nothing. This morning I plan to go to the local plant nursery to buy two or three Australian Native Plants to go into a neglected corner of the garden.

 

Bernie j.

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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I'll bet you don't have any artfully rusty automobile relics with clever landscaping on display in your garden, do you?

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Anyone recognise the Dodge Four differential back cover, or the Jaguar SS100 crank & flywheel, The brake discs and brake drums are probably VW. I am not sure what the slotted discs would have come from. In the first of the previous three pics there are some antique Agricultural implement wheels and a 1930's Austin rear axle. We have what is loosely termed a "Bush Garden" albeit in the heart of suburbia. Lots people around here are busy knocking down their 1990s houses and building "MacMansions" that cover the entire block. We live within walking distance of what is considered a "Desireable School" so almost every week we have  Real Estate Agents, knocking on the door wanting to sell out house. 

I cannot understand why walking distance is so important as none of the kids walk to school, they have mum drive them in a new Porsche or BMW suv.

Along our main business road we have a choice of Audi, Mercedes, Porsche, Fiat, Citroen, Jaguar, Land Rover, BMW & Mini, all within a kilometre or two. No common or garden cars! Or perhaps they are the common cars? You have to drive about 5 or 6 Kms to buy a new Bentley or a Ferrari!

We are the poor relations with just an old Peugeot and a VW Jetta.

We are also within walking distance to the Mosque. Fortunately we do not have the amplified "Call to prayer" four times a day, YET!

In the Shopping Malls and on Public Transport we play a game, "Spot the Aussie".......\

 

We do not encourage people to walk up or down our "drive". I tell people that we do not have third party personal insurance to cover people falling down. You simply cannot have smooth pathways and trees. We prefer the trees.

 

Bernie j  

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Enough of all that. BACK TO THE HUMBER,

Local (Victoria, Aust.) Humber owner has sent me some photographs of the Humber drive shaft. Not that I am not grateful, I just wish I could see what is under the leather "boot" covering the rear one. There are two photographs of the front end of the shaft. One the original and the second a Hardy-Spicer conversion. I think that I may end up going down the (non-original) Hardy Spicer path.

 

Bj

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2 hours ago, oldcar said:

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That looks like a sliding spline drive shaft without any splines. Or slip yoke I think it also may be called?

Edited by mike6024 (see edit history)

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It is a typical 1930-50s Hardy Spicer universal joint. The "cross" works in needle rollers. The sliding spines are nicely concealed under the parallel section, the screw on brass ring screws off to allow it to come apart. Look under any rear drive British classic car and you will find one or two.

I just happened to have one in stock so I can show you both ends. At the sliding end I have unscrewed the keeper ring so you can see the splines. Under normal conditions the splines are always enclosed to protect them from dirt and road grime. At the other end of the drive shaft, usually the rear, there is no sliding joint. The tubular drive shaft can be any one of a number of diameters. It is important that these drivge shafts are balanced to avoid any unpleasant vibrations. You can see balance weights spot welded to the tube at the rear end. It is also important to always assemble the splines correctly. You will often find matching arrows on the two parts of the sliding joint to ensure they are assembled with the right spline in the right groove. Again incorrect assembly can cause vibrations that may be felt through the entire car.  I have known people to spend quite a lot of time and money trying to locate the source of "mystery vibrations".

 

Bj

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Basically it is a machining operation, The two "loops have to be machined off the back of the foot brake (transmission) drum and an adaptor turned up. At the rear end all that is required is a new adaptor with a taper to match that on the pinion and a plate to accept the four bolts to connect the universal joint. I will try to find time (Perhaps not before Christmas) to draw up the adaptors for both ends. I can then have one of my friendly machinists turn them up. This needs to be deep (thick) enough to accomodate the end of the pinion and the retaining nut. If you look at the one on the car with the red chassis (above) It is not overly complicated but time consuming. I believe Phil Diffey in the UK has a similar "Hardy-Spicer" conversion on one of his Humbers.

 

Bj

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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DSCN5291.jpgHello

Work on the Humber has been put on the back burner for a little while. I have discovered that I have a far more pressing job.

 

Happy Christmas?

 

Bernie j.

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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I jumped down to the thread you have on the Lagonda Rapier to see why you had pulled the head.  You are probably right about the bad petrol.  Hope you have it up and running soon.  The Humber will wait patiently till you are done with the Lagonda Rapier. 

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Hello Mike

I have yet to look closely at the valves but they should be OK. The tops of the pistons were ceramic coated or it would have been a whole lot worse. My main worry is that most of the automotive trade shuts up shop for the whole of January in Australia. The pistons are very special with off-set crowns so you cannot buy them from your local spare parts shop. They are special forged pistons that suit just one motor. To take the bore from 61.5mm(1100cc) to 73mm(1500cc) was not just a simple matter of making bigger holes. A whole lot of extra work but in terms of added performance and longer (touring) legs well worth the trouble.

Perhaps I should not have sold my 66 mm(1232cc) block but that was a long time ago. Last heard of it was in Canada.

Bj.

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Any suggestion that the Humber project is dead; is simply wrong.

This afternoon I made the long drive to collect the Humber foot (transmission) brake shoes from being relined. We are lucky in Melbourne, where we live in south eastern Australia, that we still have one brake specialist firm who is prepared to go that little extra way to meet their clients requirements. When I took the pair of shoes to be relined I was prepared to accept heat bonded linings rather than brass rivets. I could still put some rivets into the shoes if I felt sufficiently strongly about it. What I  am delighted with is the super, very edwardian, woven lining material that has been supplied. I know that it sounds silly and that once installed no one will ever see them but I have the satisfaction of knowing that they are within the correct period for the car.

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Unfortunately I cannot assemble the transmission (Foot) brake until I resolve what I am going to do about the drive shaft. If I have to go down the Hardy-Spicer path I have some machining to do (have done) on the centre of the drum. This must be resolved before I assemble it. 

 

Bj

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The Summer has returned to Melbourne Australia with todays temperature said to be in the mid to high 30s centigrade.

While I am not actually working on the Humber I have been amausing myself doing some reading.

I can now tell you that in 1912 W Tuck driving his then new Humber 11HP reclaimed the Brooklands (England) track records for the 50 and 100 mile and the one hour. His speed; 75.78 mph. His Humber would have had a crankshaft just like this one.

 

 

Bj. 

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2 hours ago, oldcar said:

The Summer has returned to Melbourne Australia with todays temperature said to be in the mid to high 30s centigrade.

While I am not actually working on the Humber I have been amausing myself doing some reading.

I can now tell you that in 1912 W Tuck driving his then new Humber 11HP reclaimed the Brooklands (England) track records for the 50 and 100 mile and the one hour. His speed; 75.78 mph. His Humber would have had a crankshaft just like this one.

 

 

Bj. 

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Reminds me of the old saying; 'what the eye doesn't see the heart doesn't grieve over'.  Or maybe 'ignorance is bliss'?

 

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My dear Kiwi friend

No doubt you are quite correct except that If you have visited Brooklands you would appreciate that it was a almost flat, almost oval track with steeply banked corners. The cars tended to run quite high final drive gearing and were "wound up" over a number of laps. My copy of W (Bill) Boddy's History of Brooklands manages to convey the impression that cars may do anything up to a dozen "warm-up" laps before the timing official would drop his flag for the start of "Timed Laps". Having said that the Humber crankshaft was made of particularly high quality steel. Otherwise it would not have lasted for the past one hundred and five years and once the engine is re-assembled hopefully will last many more.

In all probability considerably longer than me.  

Finally how many of todays little wiz-bang cars would be capable of withstanding hours of absolutely flat out running.

 

If you are a connoisseur fine engineering and remarkable crankshafts may I suggest that you have a quick look at my "thread' Under British cars/ Lagonda Rapiers?#192 on this forum

Bj

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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I am still waiting for either the new pistons for the Lagonda, or some action on the Humber engine, despite everything else, many firms take their Annual Holidays (3 weeks) in conjunction with the Christmas/New Year Holidays (10 days). Now it seems that with the number of Asians making their home in Australia, we will soon have another holiday for "Chinese New Year". We are told this coming year is the year of the Rooster.

Australian businesses have to cope with more gazetted "Public Holidays" than anywhere else in the world. Added to this many "workers" have a long  (3 day) weekend every month just because they can. It is called a RDO, the "Rostered Day Off!"

Australia is the only country in the world where we have an Annual Holiday for a Horse Race. The first Tuesday in November is "Melbourne Cup Day". Because this is always a Tuesday it seems un-necessary to go to work on the preceeding Monday, making it into a four day weekend. Oh! I forgot about all the Muslim "Holy Days".  We are frequently told by Politicians, how wonderful it is that Australia is a "Multi-cultural Society".

Being retired, I work seven days most weeks, the others I try to work eight days......... Being over 80 years old I now have to work twice as hard as I may not have all that much time left!

 

Bj.

I should not complain I have a friend who has been waiting for over two years to get some tricky machining work done on a replacement oil pump for his Amilcar. 

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2 hours ago, oldcar said:

Australia is the only country in the world where we have an Annual Holiday for a Horse Race. The first Tuesday in November is "Melbourne Cup Day". Because this is always a Tuesday it seems un-necessary to go to work on the preceeding Monday, making it into a four day weekend.

 

I had to smile at this item. Here in Delaware, Ohio (USA) we have the annual Little Brown Jug Race which is one of the jewels in the triple crown of harness racing. Although not national, the whole area closes down (schools, some businesses, etc.) for race day which is on a Thursday making things susceptible for Friday closings as well. I used to kid my employer that we had to work on Good Friday but got a day off for a horse race! Looking forward to more Humber installments.

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These things all have a priority, Once the Lagonda is all back together and going, I can go back to the Humber full time, meanwhile I am keeping an eye on the motor which is quietly making some (slow) progress in the background. I only have one pair of hands and room in my "garage" for one person to work. We all know who that one person is. 

 

Bj.

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