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nick8086

Car Show question..

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I was looking into going to this show next year.. This will be the first one I have every had to send a picture in and be picked..  " Concours d'Elegance "

 

Maybe.. 

 

Car Entry

You are invited to apply to exhibit your collectible vehicle in the Castle Classic Car Show. This premier event benefits the Joslyn Castle Trust and its ongoing restoration and preservation of the historic Joslyn Castle. The Joslyn Castle Classic Car Show is an exclusive, juried event held the last Sunday of July on the grounds of the Castle.  Applications must be received no later than Monday, July 18.

 

In keeping with its tradition of showcasing classic, rare and magnificent automobiles, the Castle’s Selection Committee will select a unique collection of vehicles to be displayed. The Committee has set a goal to assemble a collection of the highest quality examples in the region, and provide a high-profile display of excellent original, restored, rare, exotic and desirable vehicles not commonly seen by the public. Owners of vehicles meeting the criteria of the Selection Committee may submit an Exhibitor Application Form for consideration; multiple entries are allowed.  See below for more information.

Enter Online

Entry is open to automobiles, light-duty commercial vehicles (i.e. pick-ups and light trucks under 3 tons GVWR, station wagons, sedan and panel deliveries), special interest vehicles, performance, competition and sports cars plus vintage motorcycles of exhibition quality. Very high performance supercars of any year such as Audi R8, Bugatti (post 1987), Ferrari, Lamborghini, McLaren, Mercedes SLS, Porsche, etc. will also be considered.

The Selection Committee reserves the right to accept other vehicles of interest for the show based upon their compliance with the theme and character of the event.

No more than 100 automobiles and trucks, and no more than 20 motorcycles will be selected.

Entries receiving preference for invitation will be those which have not previously been exhibited at the Castle and are preserved or restored to ‘original’ factory condition. All components including body, chrome, glass, paint, interior, wheels, lamps, gauges, engine room and trunk shall be in excellent condition. No major modifications, alterations, or after-market accessories are allowed. While most of the vehicles on the show field are from the 1960s or earlier, vehicles newer than 1980 are generally not considered for the Classic with the exception of supercars and those deemed to be of significant interest as “future classics” by the Selection Committee.

Modified entries will not be accepted. We will not accept clones, replicas or tributes of original cars, nor vehicles that have been significantly modified from original factory-delivered condition for on-road and/or off-road use (i.e. street/resto-rods, rat rods, street machines, pro-street/touring cars/trucks/motorcycles, and similar; drag racers, hill- and rock-climbers, mud draggers, etc.), with exception made for those entries that are recognized and accepted as having been altered per the guidelines of major antique and classic automotive clubs and associations (AACA, VMCCA, CCCA, etc.). The selection committee reserves the right to reject applications for vehicles with non-original drivetrains, interiors, wheels and tires, as well as body and paint work that has been altered in appearance from the vehicle’s original issue.

Vehicles which have previously been exhibited at the Castle will also receive consideration, but are subject to review for compliance with current show criteria as established by the Selection Committee. Owners of previously-displayed vehicles are encouraged to exhibit a different vehicle from the previous year if they have one in order to rotate exhibits and provide a draw for spectators.

Applications may be submitted by mail or by directly applying via the Classic’s web page (www.joslyncastlecarclassic.com).  The deadline for submitting vehicles to be considered in the show is Monday, July 18.  You must submit an application to be selected by completing an Exhibitor Entry Form, including exterior and interior photographs of the car in its current condition and proof of insurance. Selected vehicles will be notified by July 1, 2016, if their applications have already been submitted.  All applications submitted after July 1, 2016 will be notified soon after it is received and reviewed by the selection committee.  Entries invited by the Selection Committee will be of a standard that best expresses the character of the manufacturer, coachbuilder and the period of its construction.  Vehicles will be displayed so that spectators may learn of their significance. This is a rain-or-shine event, limited to hard surfaces in the event of wet grounds. No canopies will be allowed.

 

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12 hours ago, alsancle said:

So what is your question?

I have never gone to a show like this..  Selection Committee will select a unique collection of vehicles to be displayed.

 

The question I have has any else done a car show like this and how was it...

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2 minutes ago, nick8086 said:

 

The question I have has any else done a car show like this and how was it...

 

Yes I have, and it was ok

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I bought my cars (1937 Buick Sports Coupe, 1962 Olds Dynamic 88) to drive, not to show.  But last year, I decided to attend the Hemmings Cruise In and Concours held in Saratoga Springs, NY.

Like you, I asked on the boards here what to expect and for advice, and I got some good tips and ideas.  What follows are my impressions of the Cruise In, a low key, non-competitive, fun show, and the Concours, a more serious endeavor, which was held the next day.

 

I took the Buick and showed it on Saturday, the day of the Cruise In.  I had never exhibited at ANY car show before, and it was fantastic.  Drove the car up there (about 225 miles), wiped it down when I arrived on the field, and spent the next five hours looking at other cars, talking to people, and answering questions about my car.  I dressed the part and played jazz and popular music from the 1920s and '30s on a portable speaker.  There was no "judging" but the staff of Hemmings went around to view all the cars, and awarded a number of "awards" such as "best engine bay," "drivable dream", "best paint," all entirely subjective and based on the whims of the staff.  I went home with "Publisher's choice" much to my surprise.  All in all, it was a terrific, fun day.

 

The next day, Sunday, was the Concours, and the difference between the two days was that between a frat party and a Bible study group.  The Concours cars all looked like the had been rolled out from the showroom floor only minutes early.  Each had been detailed within an inch of its life, and judges stalked around, peering intently at every aspect of the cars.  The atmosphere, far from the block party feel of the Cruise In, reminded me of the 18th green at some big PGA championship.  It was subdued, and dead serious.

 

This year, I was invited to show the Oldsmobile in the "Preservation" class of the Councours.  There is a rule that concours entries cannot participate in the Cruise-In, so I will have to make a choice.  No doubt about it - the Cruise In is pure fun ( I was parked next to an early 1960s VW bug that had its front passenger side fender caved in.)  with all the cars crowded in.  The Concours is more prestigious, is more like an open air museum, and is going to be a lot of time, hard work, and stress to get ready - up to the moment it begins. Many of these vehicles are trailered in.and the owners spend tens of hours getting ready.  But if that's what you find interesting, engaging, and fun, then by all means go ahead and enter.  Good Luck!

 

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"Concours d'Elegance"  is pretty much self explanatory........anything in a Concours event has to be good.......REAL good........most likely unaffordably good for average people of average means....... :unsure:

Stick with which is the most FUN for YOU....... :D 

 

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Thanks for the post Greg.. I have never been a fan of judging if the car is correct ..Mine are not..

If I get a T-shirt I am happy ..

This is the last time I took this one out.. 1994.

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Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, cahartley said:

"Concours d'Elegance"  is pretty much self explanatory........anything in a Concours event has to be good.......REAL good........most likely unaffordably good for average people of average means....... :unsure:

Stick with which is the most FUN for YOU....... :D 

 

Population was 2,431  in Hermann .. They may never see a Kaiser -- that would be fun..  They have no hotels.. Just bed and breakfast..

 

 

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Greg, I remember your car from last year and it is definately Hemmings concours material.  If you decide to give the Concours a try, stop over and say Hi!!  (I'll have 2 Crosleys there).  I enjoy these "top level" shows, and have had a lot of fun showing in them.  Honestly, there is no more pressure than an AACA National show...in fact, I feel more pressure in an AACA show.  In a classic Concours, it is a show of beauty, many of them assume all the cars are correct and proper and it is simply a show of beauty with the judges selecting what they like best.   The real top level ones (of which there are very few) can be tough.  Don't be shy, give each a try and have fun....That's the important thing.

 

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There is a pecking order in shows starting at Pebble Beach at the very top and ending somewhere in a local morning cruise in at a donut shop.   You can have fun anywhere along the line depending on what you like.

 

Don't be intimidated by the use of the word "concours" in the title.   The "Hemmings Concours" as an example is really just a select car show and relative to some of the other events  very low key.   Amelia, St John's, etc are quite a bit more serious and draw the real heavy hitters and multi-million dollar cars.

 

I would say don't be overly intimidated by any of these shows.  If you have a nice car, whatever it happens to be, and they don't "select" you I would forget about it in a nano second and move on to the next one.

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Nick,

 

Let us know what you decide, and if you do go, come back and tell us what you thought of the experience.

 

 

Dave,

 

Thanks for your compliments and encouragement.  The car you saw last year was a '37 Buick.

 

I was fortunate enough to find the same year, model, make, and color car I drove when in college in the early 1980s - 1962 Oldsmobile Dynamic 88 - and bought it at auction.

 

It is an incredible, unrestored car - original paint and interior.  It is not a highly collectible model like the 2 door Starfire coupe or convertible, but it has a tremendous amount of nostalgia value for me.

 

 

 

 

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Looks like a great car....See you at Saratoga!!!

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AND.......it's a FOUR DOOR!........ :D

My '59 Chev is a four door.

I love 4 doors because I don't hate any of my friends enough to force them to do gymnastics to get and in out of my car.

Much of the FUN of HAVING cars is sharing them with friends........ :) 

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Gregleck,

Thanks for you good description of the two shows you attended and you thoughts on both.  Also, thanks for your style of participation with period clothing, music and a trunk full of period stuff.  I always think that when someone goes to the trouble to do what you do, that any show is much improved.  I'm glad that the show recognized you for that effort.  We use to go to a Easter Saturday show in Florida where everyone came in period outfits and picnicked on the running boards or blankets, churned ice cream and even had a Easter bonnet contest and a informal period fashion show.  No judging or flea market, just an old fashioned picnic that was open for public viewing.  It always felt like we entered the twilight zone of pre 1960 vehicles.  It was held in a historical park with 28 antique buildings and offered the public a real view of life in the days when these cars and buildings were right in style.

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I heard through the grapevine that St John's had insane cars over the weekend rivalling or surpassing a typical Pebble weekend.

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Nick,

You have some very nice, rare cars.  I think you will enjoy the hobby much more if you get them out an meet like minded people.  Twenty-two years of hiding them is too long.  Get them out and meet some people and share your cars.  You won't regret it.

Edited by 61polara
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3 hours ago, 61polara said:

Nick,

You have some very nice, rare cars.  I think you will enjoy the hoppy much more if you get them out an meet like minded people.  Twenty-two years of hiding them is too long.  Get them out and meet some people and share your cars.  You won't regret it.

 

Some day I hope to fix all of them up... I have two car I got in 1985.. Still on blocks today..

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On 7/29/2016 at 1:09 AM, nick8086 said:

The question I have has any else done a car show like this and how was it...

 

There are a large number of concours events around the country.

Myself, I have little interest in them.

 

But from what I understand, if your car is selected, concours organizers

take care of you very nicely, and you feel pampered and welcomed.

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John S;

       The degree of pampering varies from show to show.   I have been quite surprised by some smaller concours shows that went WAY over the top in the pampering department. One I went to this year in Mahwah, NJ  (Ramapo College) had an absolute to die for open bar and fantastic food reception the nightbefore with live music.  Field organization was fantastic, awards were very nice, a great breakfast morning of the show and a lunch that was equal of a high end resturant (included Kobe Beef Sliders)  .   The security was superb and easy to deal with. Facility was nice.   I was, as you say, "made to feel welcome" at all times.   A great event.  If anyone is considering an event here in the East, and wants information, contact me off the board by PM and if I have been there (likely) I'll answer any questions you have 

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Yeah, Get an early Car that there are few examples left of.. That leaves out the basic Tin Lizzie's of the day... Why at 3 to 4 times +++ the price of one of them Ford T's, back in the day. Runs Driver and Shines in the Sun Light and you have a Concours De elegance Automobile. ( Them oil smoking fords and wore out salt eaten old Chevy's just won't  do...Got one of the 3 -P's and your in. Packard, Pierce, or Peerless of course. And then there are the rest of us with one of only a handful left of a particular maquis. Me and my 1915 Buick have been invited a few time but there is sometimes a conflict of interest with someone so busy as myself. Summers in the not so great North East are Too short and the things to do are too many. If you have the opportunity and the time pull the trigger and set it up. You will have the time of your life. Why, Edsel invited me to the Eyes on Design Show a few year ago. What a grand time it was. Life is short, Do it while you can. Dandy Dave! 

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Keep in mind the high number of shows but the limited number of interesting cars.  The shows themselves need good cars and if you have something unique or interesting they will love you. It doesn't have to be a million dollar car.   Also,  every show is set up for a different reason.  Most have a charity they are donating too but there are different reasons for the shows.  Some are vanity projects, some are there to generate traffic at a resort area.

 

I brought this to St John's a few years ago and they were thrilled.  You can see it is certainly not a 100 point car, or even a 70 point car.

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We were invited to and attended Amelia Island a few years ago with an American LaFrance Speedster. Very nice venue and the $50 ticket price just to see the cars generally assures that those in attendance are true car folk. We've also done St John's, Greenwich, and several others with customers' cars. Maybe a different atmosphere than an AACA National show but you see cars you won't see anywhere else. We still talk about seeing the Phantom Corsair at Amelia.

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With lots of hard work for several years, and writing a few checks, it can pay off.

I was disappointed that I did not take Best in Class, but I was up against a 1953 Fiat 8V Ghia Supersonic--8 were made...surely beats 435 Kaiser Darrins made.

The Meadowbrook Concours d'Elegance was the predecessor to the one at St. John's.

 

enjoy...

 

 

 

 

 

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