dalef62

Making a new tire mold

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I was wondering what the cost would be to make a new tire mold for tires.  I am currently restoring a1950 Crosley Farm O Road with 12" military tread tires and the tires are shot.  What is the cost to make the mold and what would the average run of tires be to make it worthwhile to a tire company?  There are about 125 Farm O Road's out there now, with 7 tires on each vehicle.  If someone could chime in as to what would be involved and cost/tire, I would appreciate it.

Thanks,

Dale

PS, not my FOR below.

2007-10-23 01.56.20.jpg

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My gut tells me the price will be way more than you think.  Have you contacted an antique tire vendor like Miller Tire? Miller might tool up for these with a minimum order size.

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If you sold your house to the highest bidder, it would maybe be a down payment on a set of molds.

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If the tyre walls are OK, you may be able to retread them. In this little country there is at least one outfit that retreads truck tyres (we used to know it as the "Bandag" process) and I have spoken to people and seen the results of their work on antique car tyres. They may have the tread patterns you require and can make them smaller.

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2 hours ago, FLYER15015 said:

If you sold your house to the highest bidder, it would maybe be a down payment on a set of molds.

 

Correct. Exactly. I had a conversation with a manufacturer about a popular size in a very desirable tread pattern. High finance proposition. Would there be some industrial tire close enough ? 125 vehicles X 7 tires would be insignificant towards amortizing production costs. I hope you are rolling soon , Dale.  - Carl

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Dad was in the recapping biz in the 1960's. Basically the same type molds as used for new tire production. You are looking at many  tens of thousands of dollars for a set of new molds.

I am waiting for the inevitable "Could these tires (or molds) be made with a 3-D printer?" Wouldn't surprise me if the original molds still exist somewhere if you can find them.

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5 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

I am waiting for the inevitable "Could these tires (or molds) be made with a 3-D printer?" Wouldn't surprise me if the original molds still exist somewhere if you can find them.

 

Actually, the molds CAN be made with a 3D printer.  I've seen rocket engine combustion chambers fabricated that way for significantly less money than with conventional machining.  The problem today is the size limit on the metallic printers. You'd need to make the mold in multiple parts. The sintered metallic printers can "print" aluminum, titanium, and other high temp metals.

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Thanks for all the responses.  Just thought it would be something good to throw out and ask.  Unless something drastic happens in the mold industry, my FOR will be wearing street tires, which many wore from the factory.  I just like the looks of the military tires.

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I should have typed "Could these molds be made CHEAPLY with a 3-D printer". Therein lies the rub.

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1 hour ago, Restorer32 said:

I should have typed "Could these molds be made CHEAPLY with a 3-D printer". Therein lies the rub.

 

Well, still less expensively than by conventional machining.  "Cheap" is a relative term.

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Tire making is expensive. You need not only the molds, but D.O.T. certification here in the USA. The tires must be tested to meet federal specs before they can be imported (if made overseas) or sold here. Who made the tires originally? You would definitely want to ask Coker if they have a mold.

 

Phil

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It was the growing availability of repro tires in numerous sizes that got this hobby up and running and unfortunately it may well be the unavailability of tires that eventually rings the death knell for the hobby.

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