Jump to content

Solved one problem but now there is another


lelshaddai

Recommended Posts

Looks like a brass tube.  If that's the case it shouldn't have any rot in it so the coolant should flow properly unless there is an obstruction.  I'm pretty sure they come out very hard and I wouldn't take it out unless you have another one sourced as you may destroy it trying to remove it.  

I wouldn't think the tube would be a problem as the car ran fine before the repair.   I would look primarily at anything you did and the parts you used unless you moved some crud around and blocked something. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, so I think the overheating is much better. Granted I have not done the road test but it was at idle in over 100 degrees for 45 minutes and it never got hot enough to open the thermostat. I opened the holes on the distribution tubes and opened the holes on the head gasket. I placed a working 180 stat from a parts car I had. The gauge would show almost to the white zone but the thermostat did not open and the stat housing never was above 165. I cannot road test it right now since the gearbox is half out to work on it. 

2016-07-21%2009.35.34_zps8eoyz0g9.jpg

New problem. It smokes on hard rpm increase. I do not believe it did this before. It does not smoke at idle or at constant high rpms only when there is a burst of rpms. 
I replaced the stem seals. It idles at 800 and timed at ten. It does do a brief wobble once in a while when running. 


When I took the head off two of the cylinders filled with antifreeze. I quickly drained and dried them out and rubbed a little oil in the cylinder to keep from problems. I did ream out the head gasket water holes a little to allow more water flow but the gasket was sealed with copper sealant. The cylinder walls are very smooth and did not fell like there was a ring problem. 


How long would the residual antifreeze and oil burn until it was gone? I did not recheck the valve lash the second time can this cause it? Engines have always been my problem. 
Learn by doing and mistakes. 
2016-07-19%2015.50.13_zps3rtk9g1a.jpg
2016-07-19%2015.50.08_zpsdzhwedbh.jpg2016-07-19%2015.50.03_zpsprojhro2.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

If a thermostat is in a normal spot...it could not remain closed on 100 degree day for 45 minutes.  That is impossible.  Thermostats are designed to quickly bring engine coolant temps up to the running temp, to run better, and have less start up wear.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know much about Volvos, but I have never seen a head gasket that fit that poorly. Is it possible that the engine is not original to the car? Perhaps it is a slightly different year or model engine? Perhaps you could send a photo of how far off the gasket fit is to the vendor and maybe they will recognize what the engine is? I can't imagine that any manufacturer would make a gasket that is that far off from the actual engine shape.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am at my wits end. I cannot solve this overheat problem even with 3 manuals(including greenbooks) all of your advice out there and a friend who is a city mechanic. 

Things I have done:
1. I have three working thermostats that open in boiling water. One is a 160, two are 180's. Neither type helped or hurt.
2. Replaced head gasket, twice,  and changed the holes to match better the water holes. 
3. Pulled the distribution tube and increase the slot size to the cylinders
4. New 4 lb rad cap. 
5. Timed 10degrees, valve lash correct .020, idle 800rpms, carb rebuilt and set correctly
6. Fan mounted correctly
7. Radiator has 15degrees difference in in temp and out
8. Temp gauge reads correctly
9. New water pump
10. 50/50 coolant mix

So what am I missing? Engine has been cleaned and blown out and flushed. 

The only thing I have left to suspect is the water pump. The old one was still working so I guess I will change them out. Yes it is hot here, 102 in the garage but it did not overheat before I had to pull the engine. I have pictures of the latest readings. It did boil over this time. 

2016-07-22%2017.26.34_zpssqnckuxm.jpg2016-07-22%2017.17.38_zpsx9iavfhf.jpg2016-07-22%2017.16.41_zpsmdnhf3dm.jpg2016-07-22%2017.16.34_zpsn3oeqro4.jpg
2016-07-22%2017.15.27_zpshy5noney.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Constantly starting different discussions makes it very difficult for anyone to follow your story and help you. I am going to attempt to merge your separate discussions to help make it easier for people to follow the discussion. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The last photo that you posted does not match the previous gasket photos. I have no idea what type of engine you have or what type of gasket you are trying to make fit it. I hope you find a source for a gasket that matches your engine. I am relatively sure that you are not going to solve your problems until you have a gasket that closely matches the engine. Good luck.

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, lelshaddai said:

The only thing I have left to suspect is the water pump. The old one was still working so I guess I will change them out.

I don't change parts to guess..

 

If the filler cap is near the upper hose, do you see lots of water movement?

 

I also feel the air coming off the back side of fan...to tell if fan is pulling lots of hot air.  Then I feel the face of radiator FRONT all over, looking for hot spots or cool spots.

 

I don't always trust timing marks if on a rubber mounted pulley/damper, as it can move.  I'd almost try setting timing by ear, to find out if it then sounds like it was very retarded.  That will overheat.

 

that aftermarket carb?  is two stage progressive?  A local guy burned the new exhaust valves out of a fresh machine shop done B20 rebuild.  It was jetted way too lean, but being yours heats at idle, that is not suspect (yet) (edit, I now recall he melted the pistons, not the valves)

Link to post
Share on other sites

The engine is a 1969 Volvo B20B . The last gasket picture is the correct gasket but is new old stock. The rest that I have been showing is what you get now. They fit correctly but cover part of the water distribution holes in the block and head. I have seen others where they ream out the holes like I did to make them fit. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for all the help. I started different threads because I have two problems. I tried to split this one off. I just am not sure what else to do. I am not much of a mechanic and am shooting blind here. Believe me I have tried quite a few of the ideas presented here.  I will try feeling the radiator tomorrow. I do not see a lot of movement of water with the cap off that is what made me suspect the water pump. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have combined the three discussions so that now all of the comments are in one discussion. This should enable it to be much easier for people to help you.

 

If you are not seeing significant water movement in the radiator it sounds like a good chance that you need to replace the water pump. Clearly without good water circulation, it is going to overheat. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

As several have previously suggested, check the distributor timing curve.  Vacuum advance is desirable on a stock engine driven in a stock manner.  I could go into why some race car types don't like vacuum advance, but for the sake of brevity, I won't. 

 

I don't know what the recommended temperature differences are for a Volvo, but for a Chevrolet 350, I look for a 30 degree F. difference in the radiator inlet temperature and the outlet temperature.

 

Good luck,

Grog

Link to post
Share on other sites

Or, given the engine issue, could the rong water pump gasket block it ?

 

Remember mention of a water bypass under the thermostat that needs to be blocked. Was that taken care of ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I spoke with My Mechanic friend tonight also. I have troubleshooted everything but the new water pump. I did not see great water flow, and it sounds like I should have a greater temp difference in the radiator. Off it goes Saturday and I will reinstall the old one. I know it worked. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Take a small mirror and look across radiator coils . See if any blockages ,debris or build up . May be find local inspection company that has IR scanner with video to see if hot spot can be localized . The non-contact temp gun you have is good . But a pic will give you better picture of radiator, heat distribution on block, flow around stat  .

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...