MrLiken

Early DB Top help

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Mike, 

      You are lucky that it appears your seat backs are upholstered like a modern car and can be removed.  Mine are old school.  Dodge had a lot of advancements.

 

The wood window frame that came out of my Buick had six 3 1/2" wide jute straps.  Three for the frame to top bow support and three for the frame to bottom wood support.   The back window, glass, bowdrill, and jute straps are attached to the  back canvas first on the work table.   In the parts book this is called the “Back Curtain Assembly”.   

The jute straps and the inner bowdrill were installed first on the back side of both the upper top bow and lower wood.  .Then you would tack on the back canvas.  The jute straps basically support the rear window, as this is not really the job of the rear canvas.  This would leave the two top bow support straps exposed in the car.      Hugh

 

 

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Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)

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Hi Hugh,

That's a good diagram of the set up and is essentially what I've got with the exception of the inner curtain going to the forward side of rear bow and the canvas wraps around to cover the wood window frame with the frame I have.  I first attached the support straps to the wood frame, rough cut the canvas rear curtain and then marked the window location (making sure I had extra material to allow centering it when attaching the rear curtain assembly to car).  I then cut the  window opening, attached canvas rear curtain to window frame (a little contact cement and then staples on the inner rabbet where window is inserted).  Next the glass went in and then the inner (bowdrill) curtain attached and inner window trim.  It was quite tricky to get this whole rear curtain assembly onto the car.  I found getting the inner curtain correctly adjusted to minimize wrinkles while at the same time, getting the support straps correctly positioned and the canvas in position to be nigh well impossible, thus my decision to attach the inner curtain on the forward side of the rear bow (since it could then wait until the canvas and support straps were in position and stapled).   

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Posted (edited)

Hi Mike, 

     This is another detail that I have been working on this week.  This is how they did the front windsheild seal on the Buicks.  My car was missing the sheetmetal piece so I have been getting a lot of help from others.   One front piece shows nails (should be screws) but it shows the batting in the front.    Hugh

  

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Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)

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Hi Hugh, 

Very interesting how this was done on the Buick.  I think it's a bit more elegant than the flap that hangs down over the top of the windshield frame.   As long as the bends are 2 dimensional, it shouldn't be too difficult.  Are you going to find a shop with a roller and brake to make or make up something in wood to form it?

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Hi Mike, 

    A lot of street rod shops have brakes.  Some attic duct work companies too.   I am going to go to a  person that is local that has a brake on Friday.  I thought about a wood buck as well, which would be my second option.  Top materials were not very long lasting.  This metal piece was usually rusted after a while, and then thrown out when the replacement top came.  I think a lot of the aftermarket tops had a front flap sewn on to keep the water out.   Not sure if any of them worked very well.  This style also works better with not interfering with the wind shield wiper.   This is a photo of my sheet metal prior to bending.  I made a template so that I can check my bending as I go.  

By the way, I did a little more inspection of the rear window installation and I modified the drawing at the top of this page.      Hugh

 

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If you go to YouTube,  look up engles coach shop. He di a 5 part video series on a collapsible buggy top and how to build one without patterns. All the principles are the same.

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That was a good set of videos.  He really slows things down so you can understand each step.  I wish I had seen that before I got the final top piece sewn together...

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