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This is a 1951 dodge Meadow Brook fluid drive. there is a cable under the dash that hooks to the transmission? nobody knows what it is for? they say fluid drive does not have overdrive? some people say it might be a free wheel? come on you A A CA Mopar lovers what is it? 

 

Jerry  

dodge 001.jpg

dodge 002.jpg

51 dodge 001.jpg

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It's not stock, it's been added or it's a different transmission. Back up and give us a shot of the whole trans and maybe one from the other side for positive ID.

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9 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

It's not stock, it's been added or it's a different transmission. Back up and give us a shot of the whole trans and maybe one from the other side for positive ID.

thanks  I will take more photos of the transmission. 

 

Jerry 

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The outer sheath is not anchored at the far end.  The actuation must be very low force, but the OEM would still have anchored it.

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Yeah, regardless of it's origin, that's an overdrive unit. Count yourself lucky to have it. I might recommend placing questions about your car on the Chrysler products forums in the future, though. Perhaps that outer sheath of that cable is anchored just out of sight.

Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)

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attached are more photo of the right side of the transmission .Could it be a later model transmission somebody added? Somebody change thing around a little i noticed when i rewired the car according to the wire gram that there was supposed to be a switch on the carb to trigger the fluid drive it was hooked to a switch on the gas pedal linkage . when you stepped on the gas it turned on the fluid drive thu a relay. I fiquired that   i and it seams to work good.

 

Jerry  

dodge rt s trans1.jpg

dodge rt s trans2.jpg

dodge rt s trans3.jpg

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Still don't know what the trans looks like but it doesn't look like an M6. I didn't think they offered overdrive in 1951 did they?

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op, is your parking brake cable hooked up? it's a driveshaft parking brake. maybe the parking brake cable broke and someone just attached it to the transmission so it would not hang down.

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16 hours ago, acdeegillnn said:

attached are more photo of the right side of the transmission .Could it be a later model transmission somebody added? Somebody change thing around a little i noticed when i rewired the car according to the wire gram that there was supposed to be a switch on the carb to trigger the fluid drive it was hooked to a switch on the gas pedal linkage . when you stepped on the gas it turned on the fluid drive thu a relay. I fiquired that   i and it seams to work good.

 

Jerry  

dodge rt s trans1.jpg

dodge rt s trans2.jpg

dodge rt s trans3.jpg

The wiring you are referring to on the carb seitch would have been for starting the engine with the accelerator.

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MoPar never had a carb switch for starting the engine.  That was Buick.  Wires to the carb on a MoPar are for the ignition cut out to allow the transmission to downshift on the semi automatic cars.

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The switch on the carburetor is probably the same as a standard kick down switch which other manufacturers placed on the floor beneath the gas pedal. The same function, though, as it momentarily grounds out spark to the engine to accommodate the shift out of overdrive for increased acceleration.

Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)

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On ‎7‎/‎22‎/‎2016 at 9:22 PM, 61polara said:

MoPar never had a carb switch for starting the engine.  That was Buick.  Wires to the carb on a MoPar are for the ignition cut out to allow the transmission to downshift on the semi automatic cars.

Buick and Packard.

 

As far as the Mopar solenoids are concerned, the Carter version is in a metal triangular shaped can, and rarely suffered physical damage; so reasonable in price if needed. The Stromberg version was bakelite, often broken, and DIFFICULT to find.

 

Jon.

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Yes it does look the same. When i drive the car and pull the cable it does not appear to do anything? I am not sure that i have the wires hook up correctly ? I looked at the wire gram in the repair manual and it does not show a overdrive unit? Someone could have added it or maybe out  a  later model? 

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i plan on this winter taking the engine out and i can get some better photos?  ,I have the wires on the transmission hooked up to a tougle switch ? what trigers that over drive besides the cable that goes to a level on the transmission? when i got the car the engine  was sized up and was able to get it free and it was running good . then the rods starting knocking . i dropped the oil pan check the crank and did not appear to be that bad? i talked to a guy in a machine shop and he said you might get away with a set of new standard bearings and not to use oversize ? i put a new  set of new standard bearing in keeping track of the bearing caps and tighten them to specs and  guess what it still knocks not bad but it is there. i plan on taking the engine out and have the crank turned and might as well rebuild the rest while i am there . Does anybody have any suggestions on the removal? I was looking at it and i plan on pulling the drive shaft then the transmission and radiator . I see a cradle front motor mount and the bell housing rear mounts . Ones i get the radiator out i might have excess to the front mount? course all  the linkage and wires and fuel lines. 

 

Jerry 

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