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Sears Allstate tires

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Sears did not make tires in house .  Armstrong Tire Co in CT. made most of Sears tires. I was a Armstrong Dealer in CT.  stutzl6

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

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The car looks great with the new tires and I am glad to see you went with black walls.  

Way to many people are going with white walls on antique cars that most likely would not have originally come out of the factory with them.

 

In this case the car needing the 7.50 X 16 blackwall tires is a 1951 Henney-Packard military ambulance where whitewall tires would be totally out of place but also the car doesn't even run yet (I'm trying to get it semi road-worthy again) so I just need something inexpensive to use on it while the work is being done. Summit appears to have some but they're tubeless radials (but have a bias ply appearance) so I'm not sure if they will work or not on these wheels.

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And just for some date coding information:

tires in the 80's were three digit wk wk yr

tires in the 90s were three digit and a diamond or triangle.

this century tires have four digits wk wk yr yr

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Posted (edited)

Sears "Sport Radial" model tire. Made in France printed right on the sidewall. Michelin factory. 2 codes that could be dates. One is "7206" that looks like it was an interchangeable die stamp. The other is "75 C" that looks moulded into the sidewall. Came with a vintage Porsche out of long-term storage. The tires appear early 70s.

 

0402201925a.jpg

Edited by PaulH
Better photo (see edit history)

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educated guess:  either June 1972 or the sixth week of 1972.  European companies often refer to dates as the nth week of the year, with n 1-52.

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Posted (edited)
On 7/7/2016 at 10:41 PM, edinmass said:

Best guess is March of 1959. I think Alstate was gone by 1969. It's common to find them on cars and as spare tires. They were cheap tires when new, they made car, truck, motorcycle, and small off road tires. I wouldn't trust them even for a test drive in a parking lot. Don't ask me why. Ed.

I just replaced the Sears Allstate tires on my '32 Chevrolet in February with a set of B.F. Goodrich from Coker. The Sears tires were on the car when I bought it in 2008. Other than the white walls turning a little yellow they looked virtually new with only very slight cosmetic cracking. Between 2008 and  2020 I put well over 1,000 miles on these tires with no issue at all.  I still have the old tires and will check the date code but I very seriously doubt they are 50 years old. Here's the tire I pulled off. 

20200405_121316.jpg

Edited by James Wright
Addition (see edit history)

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Trivia: Sears was one of the first places in the United States to distribute Michelin made radial tires - a huge boost to their business. 

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Interesting read. In the "what would you do" vein, here's my recent experience. I'm restoring a 1931 Chrysler CCD8 Roadster and was looking for 5 tires as good display quality, rollers, or even driving. Takes 18x5.50. A few months after letting people know (and I won't need drivers for 2 years or so), I got a call inidcating someone was advertizing 5 Sears 18x5.50 tires, with brand new tubes, still wrapped in original packaging. Went to see the guy and sure enough he pulled them out of his garage, whitewalls still wrapped in cellophane, said his Dad had bought them for a project 10-15 years ago, asking $600. I realized the implications of old tires and that these werre likely 40+ years old, and settled on $350 (about US$225) for everything. I'm running NOS Goodyear tires on my '31 Chevy that were bought new in 1967, and after 1000 miles or so, no signs of any deterioration etc, and rubber seems pliable still. Key is to keep good tubes in them and pressure at 35-40.

 

I know I'm taking some risk, but only drive around at 25-30MPH. In any event, I will decide what to do with these Sears when the time comes, and even if I use them for rollers or display, I think price was reasonable.

IMG_6182.JPG

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Posted (edited)
On 4/5/2020 at 12:17 PM, James Wright said:

I just replaced the Sears Allstate tires on my '32 Chevrolet in February with a set of B.F. Goodrich from Coker. The Sears tires were on the car when I bought it in 2008. Other than the white walls turning a little yellow they looked virtually new with only very slight cosmetic cracking. Between 2008 and  2020 I put well over 1,000 miles on these tires with no issue at all.  I still have the old tires and will check the date code but I very seriously doubt they are 50 years old. Here's the tire I pulled off. 

20200405_121316.jpg

I had a chance to go to my warehouse today where my '32 is stored and check the date code. It reads 430. I have to assume that is the 43rd week of 2000 since the tires were on the car when I bought it in 2008. That means they were almost 20 years old when I pulled them off. BTW they're available to anyone who wants them locally for free. I won't ship them. They're not pretty but they are serviceable especially for someone who just needs tires to move a vehicle around during restoration, etc. 5 - 5.50X18.

20200406_151505.thumb.jpg.3a02f2754fe4d5d560d49e27d616456c.jpg

Edited by James Wright
Spelling (see edit history)

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As "padgett" (and perhaps others) pointed out couple times on this thread, manufacturing date code wasn't common or required until in early seventies and initially for first three decades was three digit number (last three), like in the case of James Wrights tire (see above  "430") 43rd week of either 1980 or 1990, i.e. 30 or 40 years old.

The coding was changed to (last) four digits in year the 2000, after which anything is like "... 2009",  which means 20th week of 2009 or "...0219" means 2nd week of 2019.

 

And as I and others have pointed out before, it should be considered idiotic and downright reckless to drive on public roads and among other traffic with tires older than +/- 6 years of this manufacturing date, regardless of how or where they've been stored and even if they appear new or have never been mounted.

I know there are many who disagree and believe tires are safe far past that date, but I always hope that I or anyone I hold dear don't have to share the road in near vicinity of such morons when we're out driving.

OTOH, there are thousands of other idiotic things people continuously do to or with their cars (even antique/classic/vintage/etc) that are incomprehensibly dangerous and beyond stupid...

.. and on those too, I just wish Darwinism would work more swiftly and selectively without causing direct harm to anyone other than those deserving it. 

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Boy, TTR tell us how you really feel. I'm trying to decide if I'm an idiot or a moron. I've been called both, and worse, before. 

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Posted (edited)

According Coker's website 1971 was the first year for date coding tires with a three digit number. As stated above in 2000 it changed to a four digit number. So the tires I pulled off my car were manufactured either 43rd week of 1990 or 1980.

Edited by James Wright
Typo (see edit history)

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46 minutes ago, James Wright said:

Boy, TTR tell us how you really feel. I'm trying to decide if I'm an idiot or a moron. I've been called both, and worse, before. 

You may not really want to know how I feel as it could be a shocking revelation on public forum, perhaps enough to get me outcasted.

Besides, I too have been called both and worse. Heck, at times I even tend to think of myself as one or both and then have to try my darnnest not to live up to such "expectations". 

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