edhd58

Sears Allstate tires

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I will be replacing the Sears Allstate tires on the old girl tomorrow.

I was wondering if anyone knows how to decipher the code on the tires to determine when they were manufactured.

I am just curious. 

new tire 3.jpg

new tires 2.jpg

Edited by edhd58
spelling (see edit history)

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They look like they are ready for replacement!

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Guest

This might help, but note before 2000 a date was not required.

Example of a tire manufactured since 2000 with the current Tire Identification Number format:

Post_2000_Full_Dot.jpg
In the example above:  
DOT U2LL LMLR 5107  
DOT U2LL LMLR 5107 Manufactured during the 51st week of the year
DOT U2LL LMLR 5107 Manufactured during 2007

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Best guess is March of 1959. I think Alstate was gone by 1969. It's common to find them on cars and as spare tires. They were cheap tires when new, they made car, truck, motorcycle, and small off road tires. I wouldn't trust them even for a test drive in a parking lot. Don't ask me why. Ed.

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21 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Best guess is March of 1959. I think Alstate was gone by 1969. It's common to find them on cars and as spare tires. They were cheap tires when new, they made car, truck, motorcycle, and small off road tires. I wouldn't trust them even for a test drive in a parking lot. Don't ask me why. Ed.

 

I know I bought a set of tires from Sears in 1973 and I am pretty sure they were Allstate. So I think at least some sizes were available after 1969. 17-5.25/5.50 tires weren't (and still aren't) fast moving merchandise so maybe the tires were 4 or more years old when I got them. At that time I was too ignorant to know how to check a manufacturing date code or even know where to look.

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I'm pretty sure they were not available in 1979 in any size. So with a year date ending in 9 it's either 1959 or 1969.

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In the late eighties and into the nineties, the Sears Catalogue sold reproduction Allstate bias ply tires in original sizes for vintage cars.

They also sold reproduction Allstate batteries. When Sears went out of the catalogue business, these products went away. 

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Pretty sure a DOT date was required after May 1971 . Initially it was the last three digits (WkWkYr) but could be part of the Mfrs stamp. This changed in the 80s (three digits in a separate block after the Mfr's code), 90s (three digits followed by  triangle), then went to four digits (WkWkYrYr) for 2000

 

Believe dating started in 1968 but the codes were whatever the Mfr wanted to use.

 

Was another extensive thread on this.

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23 minutes ago, 5219 said:

In the late eighties and into the nineties, the Sears Catalogue sold reproduction Allstate bias ply tires in original sizes for vintage cars.

They also sold reproduction Allstate batteries. When Sears went out of the catalogue business, these products went away. 

Mine were a catalog order item, delivered for pickup at a local store. So this fits with my recollection.

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The term reproduction Allstate tires made me smile........the thought would have never occurred to me that a store brand tire would be reproduced. It can be a strange hobby sometimes. I have never seen any Alstate tire that seemed to be anything but poor quaility, but maybe I am wrong.

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Ed, in '78 I proudly acquired my first car, a $400 1941 Plymouth two door sedan.  What provenance on that one - it had actually served as a dog house after accumulating 200K miles, but was all one color, prewar and a two door on top of it!!  At 14, I was thrilled.  We did a lot of small jobs on the car and topped it off with a set of 600X16 Sears whitewalls out of the catalog.  I honestly cannot recall if they said "Allstate" but as late as '78 - '79 these kinds of tires were available from Sears.  

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My father bought a brand new Buick in 1955 that came with US Royal tires.  In 1959 he bought his second set of tires from Sears & Roebuck.  They were Allstate.  I was 13 and remember that like yesterday.........as far as I can remember,  they were good tires, but he didn't get the mileage out of them like the originals.

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Please tell me you are not driving that car with those age cracks. Those tires must be as hard as bricks. You are only asking for trouble.

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Oh my - agree.  I had a car with a set of Firestone WWW that were around 20 years old that looked ok on the outside, but were really cracked badly on the inner sidewalls.  Shame, they still had the nipples on them - I doubt they had 200 miles on them but of course we replaced them.  Had another car with Firestones coincidentally, in the early 2000s that dated to 1973 -74, but looked like new and were very pliable, never did replace them.  

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OMG no I am not driving on  those, the new ones actually came in today and are now on the car. 

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And Ed, after all the other discussions, what tire did you order and how does it drive?

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Every time I hear someone say "Yep, I took the biased tires off my car and put on a set of radials. The difference is amazing". Your picture is the image that comes to mind EVERY time. I can't control it. The image just pops up.

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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I had a set of Bias H-78x15 WWs On a four-speed '70 Grand Prix. Friends called it "asphyxiation".

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

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Good for you!

I use bias ply on my 1940 LaSalle and my Continental Mark II. I don't care what anybody says. They don't look right with radials!

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Nice looking tires. Good aspect ratio, period looking tread, and just looks natural.

Bernie

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Allstate tires were available in a wide range of price and quality. You could buy top shelf  Allstates but most were price tires.

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Allstate tires, Kenmore appliances, and probably everything else Sears sold were manufactured for them under contracts.  They put out a specification list for so many tires and the low bidder, Goodyear, Goodrich, Firestone, or who ever made the tires.  A few months later they'd contract for another lot and another might get the bid.  I ran some Sears tires but could never get much mileage from them.  I punctured an almost new tire and took it back to get it plugged and they would not plug it but sent me to a local service station to get it plugged at their expense.  Said they weren't allowed to plug tires.  They also sold Michelin radials and I bought several sets for a '68 Chrysler I bought new.  That car was death on tires and front end alignments did not help.  I think it was caused by the torsion bars getting out of adjustment.  Every time I had the front end aligned they'd adjust the torsion bars.

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I thought Sears made some of their bias-ply Allstate tires 'in-house', but only the most common sizes at the time.  I do know their radial tires were sourced from Michelin.

 

Craig

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I have two sets, one on my 1954 Packard Patrician and the other on my 1956 Clipper and both sets were purchased in the ‘80s.  They were sold through Sears but only by special order.  Both are very low mileage sets and the only visible age damage was on one that sat flat in the dirt for several years which ruined the sidewall. These cars haven’t been driven in years but the tires still look good other than the bad one! Whether they are or not is another matter.

Edited by Packard Don (see edit history)

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