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Sears Allstate tires

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I have a LOT of Sears Craftsman tools with a 'lifetime'  guarantee.  I never considered it is the lifetime of the company

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Sears did not mfg any tires but contracted with Armstrong Rubber Co.  50% of Armstrong’s yearly production in the 50s - 70s were Allstate.  The contract called for Armstrong to be paid on a cost plus by Sears.  Sears warehoused tires in 1 of 5 plants and shipped tires directly from plant to stores.  Michelin tires were imported by Sears to the Armstrong plants to be distributed to the stores.  Armstrong built radial tires starting in the late 60’s. Surprisingly, the Des Moines plant, in the 60’s, built tires for Firestone, Good Year, Goodrich, Phillips Oil, and others.  The Firestone plant across town sent a truck every evening to pickup the days production.

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2 hours ago, Curti said:

I have a LOT of Sears Craftsman tools with a 'lifetime'  guarantee.  I never considered it is the lifetime of the company

Ace Hardware carries Craftsman tools now and have honored warranties on my old tools.  Not sure if Craftsman was bought by Ace.

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On 7/7/2016 at 11:23 PM, edinmass said:

The term reproduction Allstate tires made me smile........the thought would have never occurred to me that a store brand tire would be reproduced. It can be a strange hobby sometimes. I have never seen any Alstate tire that seemed to be anything but poor quaility, but maybe I am wrong.

Montgomery Wards tires are being reproduced in limited sizes. 

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40 minutes ago, kgreen said:

Ace Hardware carries Craftsman tools now and have honored warranties on my old tools.  Not sure if Craftsman was bought by Ace.

 

 Craftsman was bought by Stanley tools.

 

  Ben

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For years Sears Allstate tires were about the only source for obsolete sized tires for twenties and thirties cars. They were available everywhere in the 40s, 50s and 60s. They used to be common on older restorations and well preserved original cars. When did companies like Coker get into the old car tire business? Up until then Sears was the only game in town for obsolete tires.

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Allstate: 1926-1995 (Sears' divestment) spacer.gif
 
Allstate 1930 insurance.
Allstate 1943 catalog page 829, war tires.
Allstate 1953 Automobile (color).
Allstate 1956 insurance.
Allstate 1963 batteries.
Today, when people think of Allstate, they think of automobile insurance. Over the years, however, Sears used the Allstate brand name on a wide variety of products for the automobile, from spark plugs to rebuilt automobile engines.

The Allstate brand began in 1925 as part of a national contest to name Sears' new brand of automobile tires. Public response in the contest was overwhelming. Before it was over, 937,886 people submitted a total of 2,253,746 names. Entries came from every state and in 25 different languages. Hans Simonson of Bismarck, N.D., received a $5,000 cash prize for his winning entry Allstate.

In 1926, Sears adopted the trademark Allstate for initial use on automobile tires and tubes. The tires-guaranteed for 12,000 miles-quickly became big sellers in the catalog and at the new Sears, Roebuck and Co. retail stores (which first opened in 1925). Sears Chairman General Robert E. Wood credited the Allstate tire with making an important contribution to the success of Sears' retail store program.

Sears formed the Allstate Insurance Company on April 17, 1931. Allstate offered low rates, available to customers through direct-mail sales (Sears catalogs) and through sales booths in Sears stores. Allstate eventually expanded into fire insurance.

The highpoint for the Allstate brand came in the 1950s and 1960s, when the brand appeared on a wide range of products, including garage door openers, fire extinguishers, motor scooters and camper shells. During these years, before seatbelts, heaters, radios, and air conditioners became standard equipment on automobiles, Sears offered a complete line of these accessories under the Allstate brand.

In 1952, Sears introduced the Allstate automobile. Built by the Kaiser-Frazer Corporation, the Allstate automobile came in two models: The Standard ($1,395) and the Delux ($1,796) models came with a choice of optional four- or six-cylinder engines and a transmission overdrive. All automobiles came with a 90-day guarantee. As popular as the insurance and accessories were, however, few people wanted to buy an entire car with the Allstate name. Disappointing sales caused the Allstate automobile to disappear from Sears stores after 1953.

By the end of the 1960s, Sears limited the Allstate brand name to insurance, tires, and automobile batteries. By the mid-1970s, Sears no longer used the Allstate brand on merchandise. In 1995, Allstate became completely independent after Sears divested its remaining shares to Sears' stockholders, ending the company's 70-year relationship with the brand it created.

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Here's another 2 cents worth concerning Allstate tires and the date codes.
As had been pointed out, the earlier tire date code (prior to 2000?) had just one space for a number depicting the year the tire was made.  Just for kicks I've pictured an Allstate tire from a set that I bought way back when, and the date code on it is 330.  But which year "back when" was the when?MVC-519F.thumb.JPG.06809dd736be862e48db10c5e64347b2.JPGh   Darn if I didn't find the shipping label, dated 10/24/80!  
These tires were stored unused in a cool dark dry place until 2002 when they were mounted for the first time on a car that had been in long storage, sitting on maypops.  We did the parade at the Auburn reunion with the "new" Allstates on and then upon returning home switched back to the old (really really old,  pre 1950, anyone remember Mobil brand tires?) tires to resume storage of the car.  Surprisingly, the Allstates even today still look unscathed by time, except for some discoloring of the whitewall, which responded to a thorough scrubbing with soapy wet-or-dry sandpaper.MVC-519F.thumb.JPG.06809dd736be862e48db10c5e64347b2.JPG  

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On ‎10‎/‎17‎/‎2018 at 5:19 PM, Pfeil said:
 
Allstate: 1926-1995 (Sears' divestment) spacer.gif
 
 
 
 

 

In 1952, Sears introduced the Allstate automobile. Built by the Kaiser-Frazer Corporation, the Allstate automobile came in two models: The Standard ($1,395) and the Delux ($1,796) models came with a choice of optional four- or six-cylinder engines and a transmission overdrive. All automobiles came with a 90-day guarantee. As popular as the insurance and accessories were, however, few people wanted to buy an entire car with the Allstate name. Disappointing sales caused the Allstate automobile to disappear from Sears stores after 1953.

 

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?46900-Orphan-of-the-Day-12-12-1952-Allstate

 

I posted a photo of an Allstate here   ^

 

Craig

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I have a set of Allstates (5) on my 1935 Ford pickup.  Hard as stone, i doubt they would go down if deflated.  Still drives well after the initial thumping stops (1/4 mile).  Best guess is 1970 for mine based on the trucks history.   I never drive it over 45 MPH or more than 50 miles from home.

My first 34 Ford got new Allstates in 1972 with portawalls.  After we started doing Glidden Tours we upgraded to Coker wide whites.  1416698211_CoverShot.thumb.jpg.61cf4bf86b5329b48342f85306fbe1df.jpg

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12 hours ago, Paul Dobbin said:

I have a set of Allstates (5) on my 1935 Ford pickup.  Hard as stone, i doubt they would go down if deflated.  Still drives well after the initial thumping stops (1/4 mile).  Best guess is 1970 for mine based on the trucks history.   I never drive it over 45 MPH or more than 50 miles from home.

My first 34 Ford got new Allstates in 1972 with portawalls.  After we started doing Glidden Tours we upgraded to Coker wide whites.  1416698211_CoverShot.thumb.jpg.61cf4bf86b5329b48342f85306fbe1df.jpg

Assuming they are constructed like my Allstates which are from 1980, the thumping could be attributed to their being nylon cord tires, which was a characteristic from new. 

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The orange colored Allstate tins with the map of the USA on them for oil, tire repair etc are quite collectible.  Maybe the tires are too for man cave use.  Living in a small town as I did as a kid meant Sears was your go to place for most everything.  We also had some auto supply store, can’t remember the name, that sold some really bargain basement tires under their house brand.  The really big sellers were the recap tire places.  They were popular into the 1980s.  As a poor college kid the recap dealers got a lot of my business!

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Our Clarendon Va. Sears store sold bulk oil.  I'd bring in a can and it would be filled for chump change per quart.   
In the '50's I had a summer job at a back street garage installing Sears rebuilt motors picked up at the store. 
Oops, this thread is drifting off course, sorry.

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