Sign in to follow this  
edhd58

Bias vs Radial tire costs

Recommended Posts

I think you made the right choice. One, on a car like yours with modest speeds and limited use, you're not really going to see much difference between the radials and the bias-plys. The bias-ply tires will look right (kudos on the blackwalls, too) and the car will handle and feel authentic. It'll also be safe with fresh tires, which is the important thing.

 

I'm not going to go into all the pros and cons of radials on old cars, but bias-plys worked then, they work just fine now. Radials are better in many ways and I'll admit to using them on my '40s cars that I drive a lot and at highway speeds, but they're not so much better that you'll regret not having them, especially for the price difference. You made the right choice. Enjoy your car!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Stan, that thought had never crossed my mind.

There  is a local (hour away) shop that does a  lot of work on this older stuff., I'll see if they have that ability and knowledge.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Matt, both for not making feel like i was an idiot for going bias, and for liking the black walls.

My wife thinks its too plain.

It'll look a little different with the new trim rings when they come in.

 

Speaking of trim. does any one know how to get epoxy primer off stainless??

I am not sure how I did it but I got some epoxy over spray on some of the stainless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, edhd58 said:

Speaking of trim. does any one know how to get epoxy primer off stainless??

I am not sure how I did it but I got some epoxy over spray on some of the stainless.

 

Ultra-fine steel wool should take it off without hurting the shine. Or even before that, try the clay bar, which we used to use in the body shop to clean overspray off various parts. It works!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Summit has Coker 6.00x16 blackwalls for $136 or whitewalls for $148. In your case the blackwalls would be more appropriate. Is the car done up to resemble a WW2 military vehicle, possibly Navy or Coast Guard?

 

They also have Firestone blackwalls for another $165.

 

https://www.summitracing.com/int/search/part-type/tires/tire-size/6-00-16/tire-construction/bias-ply

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Rusty_OToole said:

Summit has Coker 6.00x16 blackwalls for $136 or whitewalls for $148. In your case the blackwalls would be more appropriate. Is the car done up to resemble a WW2 military vehicle, possibly Navy or Coast Guard?

 

They also have Firestone blackwalls for another $165.

 

https://www.summitracing.com/int/search/part-type/tires/tire-size/6-00-16/tire-construction/bias-ply

And, the good thing about Summit is thier prices are they same as Coker plus they offer free shipping. Shipping on 4 tires can amount to a tidy sum

Edited by real61ss
Spelling (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone, I repeat, everyone has an opinion on this subject, but I agree that radial tires do not look proper on vintage cars.  I have 6.70-15 Goodyear Super Cushion Deluxe tires on my 1956 Thunderbird, and they look period correct for the car.  And that is the issue--radial tires DO NOT look period correct.  I purchased a set of the new bias look radials from Coker Tire to use on my spare set of steel wheels, but even they cannot accurately substitute for bias ply tires.The fit and stance is off.   The wheel covers do not fit flush on the rim with the radials.  For authenticity, bias ply tires are the only way to go. 

DSCN1085.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buying the Summit Coker biased tires would have been my choice, well, it has been, a couple of times. You'll be happy.

 

I wouldn't recommend taking the car to an alignment shop. You will walk away wondering why you did it.

 

With a solid front axle the king pin inclination and the camber, for sure, are not going to change. And the alignment shop probably won't be prepared to fix a bent axle or spring if you have one. Toe-in can be set in your garage with a couple blocks of wood, a tape measure, and a piece of chalk. That gives you a chance to disassemble the links and get fresh grease everywhere. Disconnect each end of the tie rod and swivel the kings pins to be sure they are not too tight and don't have too much play.  I have seen king pins so tight the thrust bearing cap on the steering box broke out and the steering shaft telescoped on the worm gear.

 

Bernie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I'm late to this discussion, but I have a 31 Model A Ford with 16 inch Ford wires. The bias ply tires would cause wander and sudden jerks from side to side

depending on the road surface. I bit the bullet and bought Coker's new radials built to look similar to bias tires. they were expensive, but I think they are worth every penny.  the car handles better than ever and the look is quite presentable and looks almost authentic...

 

Frank

 

IMG_2049.JPG

Edited by oldford (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this