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conversion kits for 41 buick limited 90 limousine


41limo
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On 6/30/2016 at 10:54 AM, MCHinson said:

Welcome to the AACA Discussion Forum. I have moved your post from the Forum Software Questions forum to the Pre-War Buick Forum. I am sure you can find some good information here. The first thing that I would ask you is why do you feel the need to make some of your proposed changes? My 1937 Buick is a good example of an original car that is perfectly fine to drive with the original steering and brakes as well as the original 6 volt system. It is much easier (and better in my opinion) to fix what is wrong with a car than to try to modernize or modify it. When these cars were new they were perfectly safe and reliable. Fixing what is wrong with it can make it so again. Many attempts to modify cars result in unintended problems.

 

The most common parts suppliers that I am aware of for many prewar Buick parts is Bobs and CARS:

 

http://bobsautomobilia.com/shop/

 

http://www.oldbuickparts.com/cart/index.php

 

 

 

 

Thanks for your reply.  After reading the many posts to my inquiry, I am leaning towards keeping the car original and only fixing what need to be fixed to get it up and running.  And there is plenty to fix!!!  The only thing I think I may need to fix or add to in 12 volt, but am still flushing out options.  I want AC and a modern stereo, so I thought I would need 12 volt for that. Maybe not. Some say use a resistor, some say there are AC units that run on 6 volt.  I am thrilled to get advice about this car from experienced folks, I really love this car and want to do it justice.   cheers, 41Limo

 

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On 6/30/2016 at 4:14 PM, ILIKECARS53 said:

i agree with both larry  and  mchinson.    i have a 1942 buick 90  bone stock and very original.   what a great car.  stops great  and  goes even better,  can cruise all day long at 60 mph.  and  hit 70  when ever i want.    starts right up with the   6 volt system. 

 

 

That's great to hear! 

 

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As somebody who has been collecting, driving, restoring pre-War Buicks since I was 16 (now I'm 77 going on 78) I know these cars can can run with the big dogs.  Time has affected them, like it affects us.  There is the question of finding American made points and condensers.  I have really had problems with condensers made outside the USA that are no good new.  And this is not just pre-War cars.  I had a horrible time last year on tour with failing condensers on our 1971 Riviera, so I switched to a Pertronix.  So far that is working.  So, this year I switched the blue car to a Pertronix, and had all kinds of ignition trouble on the Sentimental Tour.  I think it was poorly assembled wires by the mechanic.  But I won't know until Fall when we can get to it.  However, it ran like a bad or underpowered coil because the problem was 180 degrees and over.  So, since the tour I've bought a Pertronix coil.  A new guy on ebay is making and selling custom fit wires with both ends crimped for the straight 8s.  I bought a set in black. He has colored wires too.  He owns a straight 8, '37 I think, and advised me to use AC-R47S plugs and set the gap at 45, rather than the non-available original AC-46 plug set to a gap of 28.  I'm going to try that.  I'm going to try all of this one more time, and if I'm not satisfied, I'm going back to points and condenser.  I've got a new distributor standing by.  I don't have a problem with unseen modifications like this, or insert rods and bearings.  Now, to changes that ca be seen, well us older people do like A/C, I understand that too.  On that '41 Buick I think you may have to change the radiator to one of those aluminum ones, but maybe not.  Classic Auto Air in Tampa, Florida can build air condition packages that fit amost any car neatly.  They built one for a '38 Packard coupe for a friend, tailered so you can't see it up under the dash, but he did have to remove his factory radio.  He is an electrician which helped, but he only changed out part of the electrical system to 12v, and switched over to an alternator.  The A/C runs on 12v and everything else including the light bulbs and dash gauges are still 6v.  Don't ask me how he did it.  He should write an article.  If you simply have to have A/C just keep the hood down <smile>.  It can be done neatly.  And it can be restored to original some day if somebody else wants a show car.

 

Thanks for reconsidering severe modifications to your 1941 Limited.  If you got it for $4,000 or less, running, you're already a lucky guy.  The car is way too rare to be severally modified.  You'll have enough to overcome in just re-plating it and painting it, and I guess reupholstering it.  It's no more expensive to do it right than it is to ruin it.  Welcome to the antique automobile hobby, and the world of Buick Straight 8 wonder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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On 7/4/2016 at 7:16 PM, First Born said:

      Five days!     Dollar to a donut he does not come back.

 

  Ben

 

  

 

  A bet I am HAPPY to lose.

     

       41Limo, the six volt system will work, if all is right. The battery cables must be larger than 12V ones. At least as large as your thumb.  I like to use OO [  double aught] . You will not find them at the corner auto supply store. Find a local starter,/generator shop and have them made. The starter may need rebuilding. Generator as well.

 

  If you DO go 12V,  a company called Powermaster builds an alternator inside a generator housing. Pricey, but not a lot in the ov erall scheme of things. If your wiring is good, it will handle the 12V.  Of course, all bulbs will have to be changed.  Your radio can be converted to modern works and retain the original look. The only thing seen to be different will be the battery. 

 

  By all means, please keep us informed.

 

  What part of the world are you in?

 

  Ben

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23 hours ago, Dynaflash8 said:

Hmm. Interesting. Evidently they need more courses for the people who mount the tires at the factory (1980 Century) and the tire dealers who mount the tires.  I've never had any tires mounted correctly.  Now I know, and I'll be on them the next time.

 

If you have ever been in an assembly plant, the manufacturers use a machine that torques all of the lug nuts down at the same time and to the same torque.  Depending on which assembly plant your Century was built in, I was probably in that plant doing work when I worked for Buick at that time.

 

As for aftermarket places, it is easier and quicker just to use an impact to put the tires on instead of a torque wrench.   There are also "torque limiting sticks" can be used with an impact.  Here is an example of them.  I have my own set and use them 100% of the time when I am putting the tires on all of my vehicles and never have brake pulsation unless I get some rust on the rotor.  I live in the land of salt & snow.

 

image.php?type=T&id=101  and the link   http://www.torquestick.com/cart/home.php?cat 

 

Item to note is that if the wheels are not torqued properly, you will typically start having pulsation in the 3,000-5,000 mile range.  Then the only fix is to turn the rotors or replace them.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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The Century was bought at the very end of the year as a left over.  What's the word....amorfadite?  It was titled as a 1980, but many things for a 1980 did not fit it, but 1981 fit it instead.  It also had that lousy Pontiac 264 V-8 engine too.  It was truly a very lousy car...almost drove me away from Buick...but, I've had a few other lousy Buicks since 1955 and they weren't antique cars.  A 1958 was a very good example of that.  In fact I seemed to get a stream of them in the 1960s.  Finally somebody hit the 1980 Century in the rear and put it out of its and my misery.  After many miles, my current 2001 Park Avenue has pulsing and I even had the rotors turned recently for new front brakes.  I guess the shop didn't do a good job, so as to prove to me I should by new rotors.  I'm old enough to have drive bias tires on good roads, and none ever blew out so as to bend up a fender.  And the same is true about drum brakes, none of them ever pulsed, and they always stopped okay, and I'm still here to say so.

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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10 hours ago, Dynaflash8 said:

 I know these cars can can run with the big dogs. 

 

When I first got into the hobby, in 1959, they used to tell stories about drivers cutting in to look at the radiator badge on a 30 year old car to tell what it was. Well, I run around in a 55 year old car today a lot. And if another driver doesn't see my emblem in his rear view mirror before I pass him, he ain't gonna know when I'm gone. My '60 and that '41 are only 19 years apart, not a long time in engineering. That '41 will roll great. Look into a Packard air conditioning system for 6 volts.

 

That 320 CI Buick engine pushed a lot of loaded buses over mountain passes and down the other side.

 

To the mention of passing newer cars; I passed one the other day boldly displaying an emblem noting its 4.2 liter engine, big deal he wasn't proud of it was he? And I wasn't sympathetic, so what was the point of the emblem?

 

Good choice, a methodical component restoration and contentious maintenance is going to bring you a lot more smiles than re-engineering from the frame rails up.

Bernie

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Earl: hermaphrodite is the word you were searching for...and the thought of that being applied to a car made me laugh! Thanks for that!

 

Also, the talk for a hybrid (sounds much nicer than hermaphrodite!) 6v-12v system got me to thinking - is it possible to put in a 12v battery and alternator and keep the rest original? Yes, I believe it is. Looking at the schematic for my car, which is certainly similar to those up to the early 1950s, it would not be complicated to cut into the harness in a few places to isolate the battery and charging system. Then get a couple of 12v to 6v bucking converters (30A each, about $35 ea) and a relay or 2 and you are done. If anyone is interested, I could do a marked up wiring diagram on where to make the cuts and insert the converters. I should add that the starter would be on the 12v circuit but I have known of many that have have done this, although it could be a bit risky.

 

Cheers, Dave

Edited by Daves1940Buick56S (see edit history)
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12 hours ago, Daves1940Buick56S said:

Earl: hermaphrodite is the word you were searching for...and the thought of that being applied to a car made me laugh! Thanks for that!

 

Also, the talk for a hybrid (sounds much nicer than hermaphrodite!) 6v-12v system got me to thinking - is it possible to put in a 12v battery and alternator and keep the rest original? Yes, I believe it is. Looking at the schematic for my car, which is certainly similar to those up to the early 1950s, it would not be complicated to cut into the harness in a few places to isolate the battery and charging system. Then get a couple of 12v to 6v bucking converters (30A each, about $35 ea) and a relay or 2 and you are done. If anyone is interested, I could do a marked up wiring diagram on where to make the cuts and insert the converters. I should add that the starter would be on the 12v circuit but I have known of many that have have done this, although it could be a bit risky.

 

Cheers, Dave

My friend with the 38 Packard is up at his Michigan home for the summer.  When he comes back to Florida I'll try to get him to draw out what he did.  What you are suggesting sounds more complicated than what I remember him telling me. Remember is a licensed, working electrician.  I was a pencil pusher.

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12 hours ago, critterpainter said:

41limo

 

   When you start shopping for parts for your 41 keep in mind that Bobs Automobilia OWNS a 41 90 that is a reliable running car.   Does your car have the correct compound carburators on it?

Everybody seems to have one except me, and had two at the same time back in the mid seventies.  The rough car went to Wisconsin.  The man died before he received it (I used to say he passed away upon its arrival at the sight).  Actually, he came to Maryland and spent the weekend in our house, and I took him to the big Meet in Macungie, PA.).  It always scared me to think he passed away only about two weeks later.  Man, what if it had been when he was at my house?  Anyway, that car went on to Minneapolis, MN (maybe in the estate sale).  It was recently repainted two-tone green when I sold it.  It had lots of rust in it.  The second car came from California to Milwaukee, where I bought it from the Buick dealer there who had a big collection, and two Limiteds to choose from.  It was said to have belonged Gov. Goodwin Knight of California, but later I found out I was told wrong.  Anyway, it as a nice car.  I had the seats reupholstered, totally overhauled the transmission with every part replaced by NOS and I won an AACA Junior and Senior with it.  Interestingly when we went to Hershey you couldn't hardly get it into third gear.  We took the transmission apart again and found from the box the synchronizer came in which I still had, but hadn't read, that the synchronizer had been a take-off put back in the box.  In those days I had many parts and was selling Buick parts worldwide, so we just put another synchronizer in it and everything was fine.  I used that car in my daughter's wedding....the marriage went south....and that made the car look sour to me and my wife (yeah, I know, dumb) and I sold it to a Packard collector in Tinley Park, IL.  It was Silver French Gray over Lancaster Gray with a brown interior, and it had all four bumper ends (elephant ears), a 5-band shortwave radio and a NOS steering wheel.  I've got two pictures of that car off the Internet, but I don't know where it is since being sold in 1981.  I wish I did know.  I heard the man in Tinley Park, IL sold it to somebody in Flint, MI, but that is hearsay.  This car had dual exhaust on it when I bought it.  Somebody had cut a hole in the right frame cross-member for the right side pipe to go through.  Of course we went back to original single exhaust, but the hole was still there.  In anybody ever comes across a 1941 Limited with a ragged hole for an exhaust pipe on the right (passenger) side, it's likely my old Limited.

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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Bob, my electrician friend, saved enough money wiring his own house to buy a neat old Buick. Sorry, no picture of the house.

burnnotice_59_buick_4.jpg

 

I think Bob was a member of. the Hermetic Order of Hybrid Electricians. But he wasn't one of those other things.

Bernie

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  • 2 weeks later...

39' Packard was first for A/C and 41' Cadillac was first GM.  They used the exact same system.  The Compressor ran all the time.  The manual says to remove the belt in the fall and replace in the spring.  I serviced a 41' Caddy system and it worked pretty good.  Couldn't get the pump to quite leaking.  It was replaced with a newer Ford style and I changed the car to 12 volt.  

 

In my research I believe BigFoot will be found before a 6volt compressor pump is located.  

 

I'm a 6volt believer but we couldn't do it with this car.  Two huge benefits of 12 volt are the a/c and bright headlights.  I did the 6volt halogen, bumped the regulator max, headlight switch relay and non of those things made the headlights safe at night.  The car now has 12 volts halogens and they are modern car bright.  I don't get the hybrid systems, just make it easy and convert the whole car to 12 volts if your doing it.  I ran runtz reducers on the fuel and temp gage.  Cross referenced blower motors to modern through the Napa catalog.  Generator done locally at the starter shop.  Nothing was done to the starter.  Would take a long time to burn it up.  They are made to take massive amps with a 6volt battery.  12 volts are half the amps.  Standard generator does a much better job of charging 12 volts than 6.  

You really have to be realistic with this car also.  If your not dedicated into dropping six figures into it then you probably won't be happy in the end.  I hope whoever ends up doing the car will tell you this up front otherwise they give a small number and end up at the moon.  One way or the other it's going to cost a fortune and be worth half.  

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41Limo:

There is a great deal of good advice above.   One thing you should be wary of is if anyone tells you that you can convert the car to 8 volts by using an 8 volt battery (4 cell caps).   Do not do it!  I have seen a few of these conversions foisted on owners of 6 volt cars by so-called mechanics.  They are the worst type of shortcut I can think of.   Better to go for a conversion to 12 volts and do it all right if you need AC.

Joe, BCA 33493

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