Jump to content

new 1956 Super owner


Recommended Posts

The gas tank actually grounds to the car from the straps and bolts that it hangs from. If you completely paint all the components, be sure to add a ground wire to the fuel sender! Otherwise, you may or may not get a reading at the fuel gauge.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On August 10, 2016 at 11:33 AM, ddiaz396 said:

1856, was a computer typo mistake.....I wish it could be correct. 

 

 

 

Fixed, sorry it took so long. Really enjoying the thread and seeing the progress, THANKS for sharing!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

…. appears it is time for you to paint the gas tank pan area.  If you are attempting to maintain pristine correct appearance, then this entire area was painted a rust/brown semi flat from the factory.  One of the best solutions for this is to use epoxy catalyzed paint that is a 1:1 ratio.  I use Southern Polyurethanes, Inc out of Georgia for my epoxy primer source and found it to be unbeatable.  Through much trial and error for the correct color hue is to purchase 1-qt of their black and 1-qt of their red epoxy.  Then mix in a  design ratio of 12 parts red to 3 parts black.  This will get right on the money.  The inner trunk pan and wheel well areas are painted in this color as well as is the complete floor pan areas right up to the lower half of the firewall, then it is body color from there on up.  The rear axle hub pumpkin front case is painted in this hue as well.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the information buick man!!. In one of my catalogs (TP tools and equipment) they are restoring a 1954 Buick Riviera. One of the pictures, shows the undercarriage been painted.....it's that the correct brown hue? Thanks, Daniel

hue 1.jpg

hue 2.jpg

tp.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes.

Technically, it is red oxide primer used originally. Anything close will do. That 54 was restored very well by a friend of ours on the forum and the retired owner of TP tools.

It is an extraordinarily anal thing to do, as you can't see it under normal "one knee" chassis judging that the BCA uses.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Time to refill oil and transmission fluids.......what should I use?regular Mobil 20w-50, transmission fliud Dexron 3 or 4 will do? I live in Fl....very hot all year. Thanks in advance, Daniel.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Good choices.  That is what I use in my 55 that I drive all over the country with most of the driving in hot south Texas.  Ignore all of the forthcoming  dissertations on zinc, owners manual specs, etc.:D

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/7/2016 at 8:55 AM, ddiaz396 said:

.JamesBulldogMiller55Buick I love your car!!!! Did you restored it? Hope my look like this someday!! Update in my Buick: Found source of rattling noise!!!! After removing the starter (my God!!! how do you remove the top screw????I worked for hours........finally I used a "crowfoot" socket and little by little , managed to get the screw out) found the solenoid was rust frozen and not working........cleaned and oiled and now is working fine, started motor was ok. Is there an easy way to put the top screw back????? Also started the car (just for a little be) and I was happy to hear it running after such a long time!!! I got new points, distributor cap, spark plugs and condenser.......will do a oil and filter change.....started working in the body rust (no mayor issues here, only superficial) hopping have the car running this weekend. I will appreciate any advise for somebody that restore a 1956 Buick o similar model. Ones again....sorry about my written english , but Im from Argentina and english is my second language!! Thanks again, Daniel            

Thanks

It's a 45 year restoration

I hope to be through before too many more years

Radiator and tires are next on my list

Link to post
Share on other sites

… Yes the photo of Mike's freshly painted pan appears the just about right in brownish tone.  The TP photo looks like they have taken it a step further and oxidized or aged the paint to look patina.  This can be done by spraying your last coat of paint over cured paint by over reducing it to around 50:50 ratio as this will fade lighten the finish.  Appears you wisely chose to change from the Ford blue paint to the more accurate turquoise/blue nail head color.  Where did you source the paint from as seen in the photo with the oil filter canister and dip stick ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very productive day today!!!Storm is coming to Fl and the temperature was below 95 for first time in a long time......Removed radiator, water pump,valves covers, manifold intake(notice carbon build up ) valley top. I will like to remove the heads and take them to the machine shop, but I mechanic friend told me "if is not broken....." but I'm thinking to do it anyway....good idea, bad idea??? Tomorrow I will start painting and finish to remove the power steering pump( How I separate the pulley? its pressed in?) 

covers.jpg

power.jpg

heads.jpg

heads1.jpg

valley.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, ddiaz396 said:

I will like to remove the heads and take them to the machine shop,

If it was running good and the compression test showed good compression, leave the heads alone and spend the $600+ somewhere else.  If you need some exercise then see my website for tips on cleaning the valley cover.

Willie

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

The pulley is not pressed on, it is just glued on from old age. Get a pulley puller, it's a three arm puller. Just center the screw on the shaft and put a wrench on it and go slowly. It's really easy to bend the pulley. While it's off  probably a good idea to remove the woodruff key and replace it if there are signs of oxidation or it looks scored from the removal of the pulley (pulley might take some meat with it).

 

Oh another thing: do not take the pump apart if it works! 

Edited by Beemon (see edit history)
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Couldn't remove the pulley from the shaft of the power steering pump....tomorrow I will buy a Harbor Freight power steering puller. Today I sandblasted the engine parts, primed and painted. Open valley cover for cleaning, as suggested for old-tank.....i will finish paint it tomorrow and welded with a Mig. 

paint.jpg

paint1.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/7/2016 at 9:49 PM, Beemon said:

Depending on how original you want to keep the engine looking, I would suggest Dupli-Color Ford Green (I believe is the correct color). I made the mistake of using Detroit Diesel Alpine Green and it came out too light, but I've heard the Ford Green is a pretty close match to the original engine color. You can also order the correct color from some vendors, but the Dupli-Color is right off the shelf.

is this the De1617?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, wndsofchng06 said:

is this the De1617?

 

I've personally never used it (my avatar is Detroit Diesel Green) but have done a lot of forum research and everyone has said that the cap color doesn't do the color justice. It's pretty spot on to the original color, definitely not exact, but ddiaz396's parts look pretty close to images online of unpainted pieces. If I recall correctly, someone here on the forums had done a color comparison of Detroit Diesel, Ford Green, the stuff the distributors sell and an original piece and Ford Green was pretty much the same as the original and the color that the distributors sell.

 

311607789374_1.jpg

Edited by Beemon (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Re closest to correct Buick Engine Green paint color, I'll just add that I have pulled and cleaned lots of 322 engine parts and have done side by side comparisons and the BEG from Bill Hircsh and CARS is without a doubt the closest match, with Duplicolor Ford Green coming in a close second. For a long while however CARS had "discontinued selling it" (their words when I called in an order) in spray cans, but see now that it is offered again on eBay. Price wise Duplicolor is probably about half the price of CARS. For that reason I bought and used about 3 cases of Duplocor when painting some file cabinets but would seek to use  CARS on engines. Hopefully judges can not or would not discriminate between the two. Jus my 2 cents worth ;-)

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

In the judging manual it says there is not to be a deduction for the tone of the paint.  By this I would think they mean if the color is slightly off, there would not be any deduction.  Obviously, if you painted a 63 Riviera engine red, you'd be looking at a deduction.  But on the show field, who can really tell the differences between the Ford and the Buick engine color? Most likely a greenhorn would try to make a deduction if the restorer told them they used the Ford color, but the team judge should, in theory, override that on the show field.

 

All that being said, if you are driving the car, just keep the hood closed while in motion. No one will ever be the wiser.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Airy Cat said:

Do you have a new steel carburetor base plate for the intake manifold?

 

If he has a Rochester, he shouldn't need one. If I recall correctly, the plate was only for the WCFB. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

No Airy Cat, I don't have a base plate. The car come with a Edelbroock carburetor, I replaced it for the original Carter WFCB (was in a box with the extra parts that I got with the car). Do I need a steel base for it? I tried to remove the power steering pulley but no luck (I bent it  a little be) so I think I will live it alone.....I was going to clean and detail. Also I will like to remove the timing chain cover ( I have the new gasket)but somebody told me to live it alone, because if a remove, it will leak .Also  ordered a new thermostat. Tomorrow I will work cleaning the valve covers, manifolds and valley pan to put everything back.

heads.jpg

heads2.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you try spraying the pulley with penetrating oils? Did you use a puller to try and remove it?

 

If you have the WCFB, then you might want to source the plate. My Rochester didn't come with the plate but I've always heard the WCFB did. Also, completely optional, but with today's modern fuels, you may want to plug the heat passages at the top of the intake manifold where the carb bolts to. It's there to warm the carb in cold weather with the fuels of yesteryear, but modern winter blends burn hotter to compensate. There is a thread on here that has done the intake work, ironically enough an Edelbrock conversion thread. They used a 7/16-14 tap with brass plugs, or if they cannot be sourced, cut down and slotted 7/16-14 all thread. Completely optional, I did it on mine and didn't notice anything different, but it will prevent the base of your carb from being baked off and you won't need the steel plate.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes Beemon.....I soaked the pulley all night long with a rag with penetrating oil and yes, I tried a three leg puller to remove the pulley, but it didn't work( I bent the pulley,not a lot, I will work it back with a hammer and dolly). I will try tomorrow again. Thanks for your input and help..... I really appreciate. Daniel

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎9‎/‎4‎/‎2016 at 8:41 AM, MrEarl said:

Re closest to correct Buick Engine Green paint color, I'll just add that I have pulled and cleaned lots of 322 engine parts and have done side by side comparisons and the BEG from Bill Hircsh and CARS is without a doubt the closest match, with Duplicolor Ford Green coming in a close second. For a long while however CARS had "discontinued selling it" (their words when I called in an order) in spray cans, but see now that it is offered again on eBay. Price wise Duplicolor is probably about half the price of CARS. For that reason I bought and used about 3 cases of Duplocor when painting some file cabinets but would seek to use  CARS on engines. Hopefully judges can not or would not discriminate between the two. Jus my 2 cents worth ;-)

 

I recall one BCA National Meet where "green engine color" was a VERY significant issue.  About 10 years ago, possibly more?  The way I read that things happened, two owners bought "the correct" paint from different places.  The color in question came from a noted hobby vendor (not the one mentioned), yet it was noticeably different from the other car being used for reference (whose paint had been done years prior, sourced from a "noted vendor" and was more correct in color.  This got to be a very heated discussion, it seems!  Both claiming they "were right".  Seems like the second vendor was on-site, so they got involved there, too.  End result was that the second vendor was going to re-visit their paint formulas and the deduction was not a great as initially applied.

 

Somewhere in the "paint archives", there should be a formula for the Buick Green Engine Paint.  Knowing how to convert it to modern formulation might be take some doing.  It would be better to find an original engine part with that "factory color" and get it matched locally, in modern enamels.  Or possibly find a close-match in a color chip chart and match that in basic enamel paint.

 

THEN, Preval makes some "DIY spray cans".  A glass container for the paint, a screw-on sprayer for the top.  Mix as normal and spray.  Pretty neat.  Not too expensive, as I recall.

 

KEY THING is to have an accurate color to match in the first place!  As Mr. Earl notes, there might be some existing paints which can be pretty dang close . . . just probablyhave to order them in.  BUT even those particular "lots" can have some variation in color.  One other point is that although a paint vendor might claim their engine paint matches, unless it's licensed for use, it'll probably be a little off.  In the 1980s, "Chevy Blue" in Krylon was more like "Ford Blue" with a tinge of "Chrysler Blue", certainly NOT the factory color at all.  To those who knew what was going on, that Krylon color was very obvious.  Which probably means that the "Ford Green" Mr. Earl likes is not "real" Ford Green, which might explain why it works nicely for him on his Buick engines!

 

NTX5467

Link to post
Share on other sites

 About the timing chain cover, if you need to take it off to do work, then do what you need to, but if you don't, have an issue leave it. The main issue would be the timing gears and chain, if the engine is high mileage and original you might want to consider changing them.

 The issue with leaks, in my experience with the engines, is the front rope type oil seal is good and reliable, but can be tricky to get right, if you are not used to it. I have had more troubles with leaks around the top where the water distribution and thermostat are. There is an thick O ring that makes the seal, and when everything was new, they weren't a problem, but now I used some sealant on it to get to seal up properly. Otherwise, it is not a hard job to do.

 Keith

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎9‎/‎4‎/‎2016 at 3:47 PM, ddiaz396 said:

No Airy Cat, I don't have a base plate. The car come with a Edelbroock carburetor, I replaced it for the original Carter WFCB (was in a box with the extra parts that I got with the car). Do I need a steel base for it? I tried to remove the power steering pulley but no luck (I bent it  a little be) so I think I will live it alone.....I was going to clean and detail. Also I will like to remove the timing chain cover ( I have the new gasket)but somebody told me to live it alone, because if a remove, it will leak .Also  ordered a new thermostat. Tomorrow I will work cleaning the valve covers, manifolds and valley pan to put everything back.

heads.jpg

heads2.jpg

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Airy Cat!!!! already ordered one on Ebay. Attached picture so you can see if it's the right one. But was very nice of you to offered it!!! Besides the car I'm restoring, I own another tow 1956 parts Buicks(a Special and a Roadmaster) they are almost complete......if you ever need some parts, let me know....I will tray to help you. Today I worked all day cleaning the gunk and sludge of the cylinder heads and removed old gasket. 

s-l225.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Airy Cat!!!! already ordered one on Ebay. Attached picture so you can see if it's the right one. But was very nice of you to offered it!!! Besides the car I'm restoring, I own another tow 1956 parts Buicks(a Special and a Roadmaster) they are almost complete......if you ever need some parts, let me know....I will tray to help you. Today I worked all day cleaning the

1954-1956-Buick-Carburetor-Baffle-Plate-4BBL-Stainless-Steel
 
 
  • 1954-1956-Buick-Carburetor-Baffle-Plate-4BBL-Stainless-Steel
  • 1954-1956-Buick-Carburetor-Baffle-Plate-4BBL-Stainless-Steel
Have one to sell? Sell now

1954-1956 Buick Carburetor Baffle Plate. 4BBL. Stainless Steel

 
     1 product rating | Write a review

gunk and sludge of the cylinder heads and removed old gasket. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Theoretically I don't think it would. It's not close to being as thick as half inch carb spacers, however carb spacers have shown to give fuel a longer atomizer process before hitting the intake runners so it can only get better. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...