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Tandem master cylinder conversion?


Oliver Lincoln
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I suspect you mean what we'd call a dual master cylinder.  You can buy an aftermarket kit for Ford with or without power assist.  I had to make an adapter plate for mine to use original pedal.  I suppose Speedway Motors would ship to Germany.  You'll then need to do some plumbing and bleeding.

Abe

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16 hours ago, abelincoln said:

I suspect you mean what we'd call a dual master cylinder.  You can buy an aftermarket kit for Ford with or without power assist.  I had to make an adapter plate for mine to use original pedal.  I suppose Speedway Motors would ship to Germany.  You'll then need to do some plumbing and bleeding.

Abe

thank you, Abe, i found one at Bob Drake, its an cylinder for mustang II ad an adapter kit

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40 minutes ago, b6vt said:

Will the dual master cylinder  make a noticeable difference in the braking??  Glenn Lorei 

No, its just a matter of security and standard in later cars.

If one circiut is leaking you keep some rest of break power.

With a single cylinder you have no brake anymore.

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Will make a big difference if a leak or malfunction should occur,  With a dual cylinder you still have two wheels to brake.  The piston diameter in the new master cylinder will impact the braking effort.  I put a 7-inch dual vacuum power break unit in front of the new master cylinder, which does help braking quite a bit.  Of course, the new master cylinder does no longer line up with the fill hole in the floor, so I had to get a remote fill kit with a reservoir on the inner fender.  Next step is to use a Speedway kit for Ford truck disks in front with a proportioning valve to balance front and rear and a 2 lb. residual valve to keep front disks in place.

Abe

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I agree with Abe.  You need to be sure the cylinder bore is close if not the same bore size as your original.  In later years like the Mustang, the bore sizes increased as less pressure and more volumn was needed.  The second thing is residual valves.  Use 10 pounds for drums, and 2 pounds for disc.  These valves keep a preload pressure on the brakes.  They say the residual valve is not necessary if the master cylinder is on the firewall.  I still use them as they aren't expensive.

 

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  • 2 months later...
On 28.6.2016 at 11:30 PM, abelincoln said:

Will make a big difference if a leak or malfunction should occur,  With a dual cylinder you still have two wheels to brake.  The piston diameter in the new master cylinder will impact the braking effort.  I put a 7-inch dual vacuum power break unit in front of the new master cylinder, which does help braking quite a bit.  Of course, the new master cylinder does no longer line up with the fill hole in the floor, so I had to get a remote fill kit with a reservoir on the inner fender.  Next step is to use a Speedway kit for Ford truck disks in front with a proportioning valve to balance front and rear and a 2 lb. residual valve to keep front disks in place.

Abe

Hi, Abe, can you tell me, wich parts you uses for the conversion exactly and where did you order them.
I found some for Ford cars only, ist that the same. Wich Ford is identical to my 1947 Continental Coupe ? (regarding master cylinder mount)
Thanks in advance, Oliver

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Oliver:

Yes, (Yaah)  I ordered mine from an outfit that was close to my location, but is no longer in business.  The master cylinder quit on me, so I got a replacement from Master Power, www.mpbrakes.com.  So far, so good,  If I had to do it again, I usually get great service from Speedway Motors.  They should have everything you need.  They are also good with advice.  I think Summit Racing also has pretty much everything.  Check out Jegs as well.  I'm going to replace the cheap hoses from the fenderwell mount remote fill to the master cylinder soon. 

You need:  dual master cylinder, small size to fit in small space ( had to notch the crossmember to make it fit, got a spare Corvette MC that wouldn't fit)

                  Remote fill kit with tops for master cylinder, hoses, and reservoir for fender well.

                  Dual diaphragm booster, 7 inch size.

                  Adapt stock brake pedal assembly to booster (I used a 3/8 inch plate and cut holes, easier to just buy an aftermarket assembly)

                  1/2 inch hose and T to splice vacuum line to booster

For disk brakes:  Speedway kit with custom bracket, new wheel bearings and races with Ford truck 5 on 5 1/2 lug rotors, Chevy calipers,  You need to shrink an adapter ring on stock spindle.  Also, need adjustable proportioning valve to equalize pressure front and back, 2 lb residual valve for front brakes, and a bunch of brake tubing and adapters for the master cylinder, proportioning valve, and front disks.  Lincoln has 1/4 inch lines, disk calipers and proportioning valve take 3/16 line.

Hope this helps

Abe

                  

Abe

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Thank you, Abe! Helps me a lot!

Disk brake conversion i do not want.

 

Still not sure wich mounting hardware did you use for booster and master cylinder?

I find some conversion plates for 42-48 Ford , are they correct? they mostly have an own brake pedal, wich is not installed like the original one.

I am not sure if this works for my lincoln.

Do you have photos of your conversion or of the actual state?

My problem is, i live in germany and have to pay huge shipping costs so i must be sure to order the correct hardware.

Somewhere i found a special master cylinder with remote fill kit included (no fixed reservoir attached), all i have to make sure it has also 1 inch bore?

 

Speedway Motors has too high shipping costs to germany, but summit was always fair.

Oliver

 

 

 

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Oliver:

You  should be able to make the parts work, You'll still need to make or buy an adapter plate.   Here is mine bolted to booster.  I used a steel plate, but aluminum might be easier to drill.  I used a coupling nut to tie old rod to new booster input shaft.  Had to drill holes in frame for long bolts and for booster bolt heads.  Holes in plate cover bolt heads that secure the stock pedal assembly.  The master cylinder bolts on the back of the booster, so a separate bracket is not needed, but I did have to notch the cross member behind the master cylinder to make room.  Seems like you might find some local parts as they make quite a few nice cars in Germany.

Abe

 

brake booster.jpg

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The 39-48 Ford and Lincoln master cylinder is the same as one used on a 1968 Mercedes 600.

 

Since you are in Germany, you might look into using a Mercedes power brake set up on your Lincoln. You may find parts that can be used with less modifications than the Summit Racing parts.

Edited by 19tom40
add new information (see edit history)
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Thank you Tom for this interesting fact!
I really found the MC wich is looking equal Lincoln, but i can not find any boster conversion till now.

I also did not find if it is mountet below the fllor like Lincoln.

 

Seems, the Germans like more the original state ;-)

 

Oliver

Edited by Oliver Lincoln (see edit history)
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Oliver:

The 7 inch dual booster fits just fine.  Some firewall mounted boosters are much larger.  We used new bolts to secure the pedal assembly through the frame with nuts on the engine side of the frame.  Had to cut holes in the adapter plate to cover the bolt heads.  You mount the booster so the rod on the booster front will connect to the Lincoln rod with the cotter pin using a couple of coupling nuts with a short piece of threaded rod inbetween.  This also gives you a place to adjust the length of the combined rod to adjust pedal height.

Hope this helps

Abe

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks again, Abe!
I was afraid, there isn't enough hight behind the Frame, where the stock MC is mounted.

Because the booster is much larger than the old MC.

The position of the pushrod comes much lower then. does this work with the stock pedal and pushrod?

Shall i order the summit booster, or is scott drake, classic performance better quality? Dont want to safe money for less security.

Oliver

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Oliver

I did have to cut a hole in the cross member behind the new master cylinder for the MC to fit behind the booster,  Just line the Booster up with the stock rod that connects to the pedal assembly at the stock height.  I used two coupling nuts to connect, see above picture.  Perhaps someone local to you has a 7 in dual booster that would work.  Must be an auto parts store somewhere nearby.  Show them a picture.  Good luck!

Abe

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  • 6 months later...

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