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Iconic rare 1941 Buick Hollywood Woodie For Sale


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Iconic rare 1941 Buick Hollywood Woodie For Sale

 

This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to own one of the rarest and most iconic Woodies. Designated Model 49, the Series 40B ‘Woodie’ six passenger estate wagon was the least produced with just 838 leaving Flint and of those only a dozen are thought to be enjoying roads today, making them highly desirable.

 

We are based in the South East of the UK.  The car has an American title.  We'd consider offers in excess of £300,000.

 

For all enquiries please contact info@rie-store.com

 

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Edited by Stuart Spicer
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Hi Stuart

 

I don't mean to be rude, however this is not really a commercial site, though we are all interested to see what is out there. There are rules which should be tiered to (see Peter's post at the top of the list), including price and location listed in posts.

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34 minutes ago, R Holden said:

Yes, Mudgee, NSW, Australia, is that a problem?

 

Russell, I meant the seller!

Since this website attracts people from all over,

it's helpful to know where the car is before one gets one's hopes up.

You were right to ask the seller for his price and location.

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Hi all

 

I agree beautiful car. I was just curious as to what he was asking and where it was at, these are the very first things that run through my mind if I even consider a car,  as I have to work out how to get it home and the exchange rate, etc. Generally if it is $$ POA I consider it is going to be well over market price and unless it is something I've been searching for I just flick by.

 

One of the things I love about this site is the cars, info, advice and friendliness (well most of the time:) ) and the fact we have rules re- price, location, generally photos and back ground. There are a few Dealers who do advertise but they always give very good detail, price, location, background and often great history, and  are generally members of the AACA. 

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On 17/06/2016 at 11:13 PM, R Holden said:

Hi Stuart

 

I don't mean to be rude, however this is not really a commercial site, though we are all interested to see what is out there. There are rules which should be tiered to (see Peter's post at the top of the list), including price and location listed in posts.

Sorry I didn't realise, it was totally unintentional.

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1 minute ago, Stuart Spicer said:

Sorry all, perhaps I should have been clearer.

 

We are based in the UK.  The car has an American title.  We'd consider offers in excess of £300k.

 

Good luck...

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I'm not up on the value of Buicks and this indeed looks to be a fine example.

 

But I think if I had a half a mil to spend on a car I would be able to find something that would be a better investment.

 

I have to suspect that the Brits are doing better than I thought.

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If I have to ask the price because it isn't posted I move on.  Even when I have a big roll of cash know the value and am ready to pay a fair market price for something.  I don't want to know the whole sales pitch before I get a price.   It's always been a waste of Everyone's time I have dealt with.   Parts lots are even worse to buy as is literature in bulk.  It's like pulling teeth to get a price on those usually. 

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2 hours ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

"If you have to ask the price, you can't afford it."

 

A popular saying, but not true!

 

I once told a collector I knew about a car for sale that might interest him.

He had an 8-figure income (well over $10,000,000 a year--when you

reach that level your income becomes public knowledge).

 

The first thing he said was, "What's he asking for it?"

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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The biggest myth in this hobby isn't "totally rust free!"

 

It's "Rich people are fools."

 

With all due respect to the seller, it really is a lovely car. A '41 Buick woody is indeed a rare beast and they're wonderful machines (obviously I'm a fan). But the price is too big by about three orders of magnitude. I can see $125,000, maybe even $140,000 if it's the best in the world. But it's still just a Special, still just a Buick, and still just a mass-produced car, regardless of how many survive. I think it's more than 12, because I know of three just in Ohio. And at $450,000, I have the choice of a low-end Duesenberg, a top-end V12 open Packard, a Marmon Sixteen sedan, several early Bentleys, and a whole host of remarkable cars that aren't Buick Specials. I suspect you're fishing for Nicola Bulgari with this car, but doesn't he already have one?

 

To bolster my argument, I am negotiating to acquire a 1949 Buick Roadmaster woody right now, perhaps a #2 condition car, great colors (blue with red leather). Maybe not as nice as your '41, but pretty darned good. I'd argue that a one-year-only 1949 Roadmaster woody is more desirable, rarer (only 653 built), more powerful, and more usable than a 1941 Special woody. We'll see where my negotiations end up, but I don't expect I'll be putting a six-figure retail price tag on this particular car. Is your car worth four and a half times as much? Hmmmm...

 

I hate it when people tell me my prices are too high. I want to ask them if civilians walk into their office and tell them how to do their jobs, and how would they react to me telling them they're doing their job wrong and I know as much as they do because I read a magazine about it? So I'm hesitant to do it here, especially to another dealer. On the other hand, this kind of pricing is what gives dealers a bad name. You embarrass yourself and our industry like this. I hope you get something close to your price from someone who simply falls in love and must have it, but quite honestly, I could have Doug Seybold conjure a new 1941 Buick Special woody from scratch for less money than you're asking for this one.

 

Is this a quarter-million-dollar car? A $180,000 car? $125,000 car?

 

photo26.JPG

 

Nope.

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3 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 So I'm hesitant to do it here, especially to another dealer. On the other hand, this kind of pricing is what gives dealers a bad name. You embarrass yourself and our industry like this. I hope you get something close to your price from someone who simply falls in love and must have it, but quite honestly, I could have Doug Seybold conjure a new 1941 Buick Special woody from scratch for less money than you're asking for this one.

 

Is this a quarter-million-dollar car? A $180,000 car? $125,000 car?

 

photo26.JPG

 

Nope.

 

Matt, my wife is in love with the '49 you noted above, and maybe we'll have time to visit your shop after the CCCA Mini-CARavan - but the Roadmaster woodie is certainly beyond my budget, especially with our grandson starting college in the fall. 

 

Thanks for the photo of the '49

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This all comes from the thought from some outside are that people here are just stupid. They are just not! 

 

Please learn that lesson.

 

I have see people post cars they don't own for several times the price the actual owner wanted ....... I am not suggesting that in this case here. Only that we are enthusiasts here not fools. I think the honest and tactful responses post in this thread PROVES THAT!!!!

 

 

Edited by RU22 (see edit history)
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Ok just a few things. Firstly we are not a dealer, we're a small privately owned English restoration company and we've spent the last 28 months meticulously restoring this beautiful car. We don't know what the car is worth – who does? The value is only dictated by how much someone is willing to pay for it. We've tried to find how much the last one sold for but can't find when the last one came to market, so we have to test the market. It’s as simple as that.

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10 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

The biggest myth in this hobby isn't "totally rust free!"

It's "Rich people are fools."

 

Good point.  Americans who have become very well-off

didn't do so through ignorance, sloth, or wild free-spending.

They usually have done so because they were intelligent, had a

great business idea, and worked harder than anyone else to

see it succeed--persevering even when everyone else doubted.

They may have taken a great financial risk to develop their product.

Sometimes even their wives couldn't see their vision.

 

And if their money came from a previous generation,

they have either extended the effort or invested wisely

through market turmoil, and despite taxes that might work hard against them.

 

I have seen some great woody wagons for sale in the

magazine of the National Woody Club for $60,000.

May you sell your car, Stuart, for a price that's fair to both seller and buyer!

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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5 hours ago, Stuart Spicer said:

Ok just a few things. Firstly we are not a dealer, we're a small privately owned English restoration company and we've spent the last 28 months meticulously restoring this beautiful car. We don't know what the car is worth – who does? The value is only dictated by how much someone is willing to pay for it. We've tried to find how much the last one sold for but can't find when the last one came to market, so we have to test the market. It’s as simple as that.

 

So what your telling us is you worked on this for a couple years and don't have a clue what the finished product would be worth? Like I said.......

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5 hours ago, Stuart Spicer said:

Ok just a few things. Firstly we are not a dealer, we're a small privately owned English restoration company and we've spent the last 28 months meticulously restoring this beautiful car. We don't know what the car is worth – who does? The value is only dictated by how much someone is willing to pay for it. We've tried to find how much the last one sold for but can't find when the last one came to market, so we have to test the market. It’s as simple as that.

 

 

It has been said before, Ebay is a good way to find current value. Simply list it at a high reserve and see what it bids to.

Testing the markets with an inflated price makes you look greedy. (I know we wanted an asking price as per the rules here)

I suspect that you haven't learned that there is no money in investing in restorations yet, only personal satisfaction, which is priceless.

In my opinion shops that do restorations for others (billable hours to those well off guys mentioned above)  are the only ones that come out financially in this hobby.

 

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16 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

A popular saying, but not true!

 

I once told a collector I knew about a car for sale that might interest him.

He had an 8-figure income (well over $10,000,000 a year--when you

reach that level your income becomes public knowledge).

 

The first thing he said was, "What's he asking for it?"

John, I was just being facetious.

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1 hour ago, Grimy said:

The Pound has dropped almost precipitously with the Brexit vote, making the price in Pounds a bit more reasonable today as opposed to yesterday......

Now is the time to buy Pounds, the car isn't going anywhere near as fast as the Pound will recover 50% of it's drop.

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Hi , George , yeah I was about to comment likewise. Golf vacations in Scotland and old cars will be a bit more affordable. Any of you ancients remember the prices of great English cars in The Exchange & Mart 50 years ago ? A couple or 3 100s of Sterling Pounds could have put you into a good XK 120. Seems to me the occasional SS 100 , or some Bentley or RR caught my eye at a good price. Of course , hey , old cars were pretty cheap here , too. I personally know of a 1930 Mercedes - Benz SS 38/250 factory bodied tourer , White/Red , way too nice to restore , that went for $4700 in the early '60s in Pasadena , CA. Seller , Dr. Linus Pauling's son , Peter, bought it in England (LHD). Well , of course that would be $60k - $70k or so in today's money , but ................. Oh , well , this BREXIT  happened just as I was starting to think U.K. might be a good market for expatriating U.S. cars ! Ha , ha ! 

 

Stuart : Please keep us in the loop. We are all friendly. Many Anglophiles. Some of us have a caustic component to what passes for our wit , but you will never run out of helpful , constructive advice here.

 

And George : I am still hoping to pass through the Bay Area , Winter '16 - '17 in my 1927 Cadillac. It awaits my return in 'Vegas , and hopes my delicate health will permit the return leg in significantly cooler temps. Thank you for your kind offer of hospitality. 

                    

                                  Best wishes , you all in "The Old Country" ! 'Round here , we Colonials might have described your predicament 

.                                                 as being "Caught between a rock and a hard place". Weep.  -  Carl

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Matt, a top end open Packard isn't 450k anymore. A factory bodied V-12 conv coupe brought 1.1 Mil a few months ago. And there is another up for sale at Pebble for 1.5+, also factory. A 34 custom 12 sold for over 6 a while ago if I remember correctly. And I have seen prices of discussed of 8 for the legendary cars. I don't own any Packards, so these are just observations, not opinions. The J market is higher for a bottom feeder car, I think 450 was eight years ago, good open cars with provenance are now 3 plus. Again, I don't own one of them either. Several popular Marques are in the basement, and only the top 1/2 of one percent are bringing good money. Brass stuff is all over the place, high and low end seem stable, middle of the road stuff seems hot/cold depending on the car. As far as woodies go, I think the market is down fifty percent from 2008. Ed

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