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Restore my buick electra 1969 :)


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22 hours ago, Smartin said:

 

Thank you but the problem with this model of nut retainers is that there is no nut, it is just a thread in an axis.
It's nut retainers are used to fix the bottom of the front fenders, something solid is needed
Thanks anyway :) 
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Sebastian,

I Googled "J nuts" and found these on Amazon.  You buy them buy the size and TPI (Threads Per Inch).  This one happens to be a 1/4" x 20  1/4" (.25") x 20 threads per inch.  If you're trying g to get close to .37 inches, you'd be at .375" or 3/8" get the size J nut you think is close then buy the bolt to fit 3/8" x 18, 20, 24, 28.  You can make the pair up to fit your need. The U.S. doesn't use decimals for nut and bolt sizes, it uses fractions.  You can probably find a conversion chart that will get you close.  Most common are 1/4, 5/16, 3/8, 7/16, 1/2, 9/16. 

  

41aaA0eiYgL._SL1000_.thumb.jpg.236f513b60226b71a5e52f99a2e3dd10.jpg

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The lower rear fender mount bolts are 3/8" thread, 16 threads per inch.  I wouldn't have much faith in the J clips with the nuts tack welded in, if you want to tighten them enough to hold the fender in place.  I'd rather use the integrated threaded clip like I posted earlier.  That way, there is no nut that can snap off the clip.

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7 hours ago, Smartin said:

I just used that type on the bottom of the fenders I installed yesterday on the Tealmist Gray car.  They have plenty of strength.

 

3 hours ago, RivNut said:

Sebastian,

I Googled "J nuts" and found these on Amazon.  You buy them buy the size and TPI (Threads Per Inch).  This one happens to be a 1/4" x 20  1/4" (.25") x 20 threads per inch.  If you're trying g to get close to .37 inches, you'd be at .375" or 3/8" get the size J nut you think is close then buy the bolt to fit 3/8" x 18, 20, 24, 28.  You can make the pair up to fit your need. The U.S. doesn't use decimals for nut and bolt sizes, it uses fractions.  You can probably find a conversion chart that will get you close.  Most common are 1/4, 5/16, 3/8, 7/16, 1/2, 9/16. 

  

41aaA0eiYgL._SL1000_.thumb.jpg.236f513b60226b71a5e52f99a2e3dd10.jpg

 

3 hours ago, Smartin said:

The lower rear fender mount bolts are 3/8" thread, 16 threads per inch.  I wouldn't have much faith in the J clips with the nuts tack welded in, if you want to tighten them enough to hold the fender in place.  I'd rather use the integrated threaded clip like I posted earlier.  That way, there is no nut that can snap off the clip.

 

Thank you very much for your answers, the measurements in France are in centimeters and it was not easy to translate exactly into inches, thank you for your help ;) 
I'm waiting for a response from a garage and if they don't have that I'll order the ones you sent me.
Thank you :) 

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You're only using the clip on the J-nut to hold the nut in place until you can get a bolt started.  No difference in holding the nut in place with your finger until you get the bolt started.  Then when you tighten the bolt, the clip is just there.  The nut and bolt are doing the clamping; that nut is not going anywhere on it's own.  The use of the other J-fastener is usable for fastening sheet metal to sheet metal.  If you're fastening sheet metal to iron, I'd use the J-clip with the nut.

 

If you Google "fractions to decimals to metrics" you can find charts to help you*.  I have a digital caliper that can be set to read in fractions, decimals, or metrics.  It was not expensive.  Less than $20 American.

 

The decimals for these fractioins has been truncated to four decimals.  For example 1/64 is actually 0.015625, not 0.156;  1/32 is actually .03125 not .0312. You get the idea. Unless you're doing rocket science those lost decimals won't make any difference.  The last 5 in 0.015625 is the millionths place.  I don't think you have a ruler that can break an inch into a million parts.  😁  Thousandths might come in handy when measuring clearances on an engine. The most common sizes will end in either a 0 or a 5.  Those numbers are exact at four decimal places.  I'm sure that you know how to convert metrics.  Here in the U.S. when we try to teach metrics to kids we use the:

King Henry Died Unexpectedly drinking chocolate milk.

Kilo Hecto  Deca      Unit             deci       centi          milli

 

The Units can be liters, meters, or grams

 

.conversion-chart-fraction-to-decimal-fraction-to-decimal-conversion-chart- fraction-to-decimal-chart-fraction-decimal-… | Decimal conversion, Decimal  chart, Decimals

 

 

I really enjoy following your posts.  Keep it up.

 

Ed

 

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12 hours ago, RivNut said:

You're only using the clip on the J-nut to hold the nut in place until you can get a bolt started.  No difference in holding the nut in place with your finger until you get the bolt started.  Then when you tighten the bolt, the clip is just there.  The nut and bolt are doing the clamping; that nut is not going anywhere on it's own.  The use of the other J-fastener is usable for fastening sheet metal to sheet metal.  If you're fastening sheet metal to iron, I'd use the J-clip with the nut.

 

If you Google "fractions to decimals to metrics" you can find charts to help you*.  I have a digital caliper that can be set to read in fractions, decimals, or metrics.  It was not expensive.  Less than $20 American.

 

The decimals for these fractioins has been truncated to four decimals.  For example 1/64 is actually 0.015625, not 0.156;  1/32 is actually .03125 not .0312. You get the idea. Unless you're doing rocket science those lost decimals won't make any difference.  The last 5 in 0.015625 is the millionths place.  I don't think you have a ruler that can break an inch into a million parts.  😁  Thousandths might come in handy when measuring clearances on an engine. The most common sizes will end in either a 0 or a 5.  Those numbers are exact at four decimal places.  I'm sure that you know how to convert metrics.  Here in the U.S. when we try to teach metrics to kids we use the:

King Henry Died Unexpectedly drinking chocolate milk.

Kilo Hecto  Deca      Unit             deci       centi          milli

 

The Units can be liters, meters, or grams

 

.conversion-chart-fraction-to-decimal-fraction-to-decimal-conversion-chart- fraction-to-decimal-chart-fraction-decimal-… | Decimal conversion, Decimal  chart, Decimals

 

 

I really enjoy following your posts.  Keep it up.

 

Ed

 

 

Thank you very much for your help, indeed that makes a lot of number if we read the whole number :D 
I'm trying to understand and thanks for the diagram ;)
In France we use commas (,) and not periods (.), And we put a comma behind a number, for example: 1.25 cm.
Thanks again, I think I'll order the J nut retainers that Smartin sent then.
Thank you :) 

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Either type will be fine. 

 

RivNut accurately pointed out that it's the nut itself doing the holding.  However, on many applications the clip will also act as a washer if there is a large opening behind it; in this case the nut staying on the clip is important.

 

I've used both types, and the ones Smartin recommended are quite sturdy.  Also, the protruding threaded portion is very large, with what I believe are more threads than an ordinary nut that size would have, adding to the strength.

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On 9/21/2020 at 5:04 AM, lancemb said:

Either type will be fine. 

 

RivNut accurately pointed out that it's the nut itself doing the holding.  However, on many applications the clip will also act as a washer if there is a large opening behind it; in this case the nut staying on the clip is important.

 

I've used both types, and the ones Smartin recommended are quite sturdy.  Also, the protruding threaded portion is very large, with what I believe are more threads than an ordinary nut that size would have, adding to the strength.

 

Thank you very much for the information ;) 
This weekend I ordered the ones that Smartin sent me, and this afternoon the garage that sells me the parts for the buick told me that it was able to find nut retainers and to order them.
So I'm going to get some nut retainers that Smartin found and I'm also going to get what the person selling me the parts has found.
So I will have both models :) 

At the moment I am working on the front wing on the passenger side, I have finished the work in the sheet metal and I just have to paint the wing :) 

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  • 2 weeks later...
Hello everyone, here is the rest of the work on the Buick.
I continued with the front wing on the passenger side, I had already redone it at the very beginning and it was almost the first part that I had done again, but over time something did not please me about what I had done .
And one little thing, I actually redid everything I had done.

The first mistake I made was that I had cut a piece much larger than the damage there was, and when we are not fitted with an English wheel to redo this series of "waves" (two in everything), it's not great
Fortunately from the beginning I keep all the songs that I have redone.

So after having sanded the piece of the wing, then having passed it in after phosphating then cut the really sick part, I positioned it on my sheet that I had redone then cut
 
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Then positioning my original sheet, the advantage of reusing this sheet is already a saving of time and especially to really have the original shape.
The sheet is just laid, we can see that there is some straightening to do before welding
 
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Then application of white primer inside the piece (the perforated part will obviously be redone)
 
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Then weld along the piece
 
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Then I roughened by grinding the welds, there will be some straightening to do again then a final sanding
 
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Then I take care of the return, I took the part I had made 4 years ago but I modify it a little
 
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Then I release the track that was the only one to redo at the beginning
 
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Then make another one, and pointing (I pointed a tube to avoid deformations because of the welds)
 
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It's starting to take shape, there is still some straightening to do
 
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presentation of the wand for verification
 
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Then around the liner, I took the one I made 4 years ago and I modify it
 
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And grinding of welds
 
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Then I take a part that I had already made and I also modify it by making a few cuts and drilling the part to point it as at the origin
 
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I will therefore have to apply the finishing paint to the inside of the wing.

I also realized that I couldn't reassemble the front fenders to paint the Buick because otherwise I wouldn't be able to reassemble the lower wing sticks, they are aimed from the inside, they are not clips

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
Good evening everyone, here is some news of the work.
I then took care of the inside of the safe.
So I still have to paint the inside of the trunk but I did not know what shade to do it,
And with the information that I had and that you had given me, I saw that according to the models there was several way to paint the interior of the boxes compared to their model. the interior was body color or black and on other models it is black with white projections.
Then I also simply looked at my second Buick (I bought a second Electra 1969 in very bad condition for a future project :) ) and we can see on this photo below that there is also only the banner  headlights which is body color (the photo was taken by the location of the speaker, I could not yet open the trunk)
 
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Originally there are several black cardboard fairings (as I still have) which covers the strip of the rear headlights, the rear fenders and wheel arches. Then come on the floor an original black carpet.
So with the little that I saw and that the entire trunk will be covered with fairing and carpet, I painted the interior black except the headlight strip which will be the body color.

Sorry for the pictures, the sun on the white is dazzling
 
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I am also starting to inquire about painting it, and a bodybuilder / painter told me that he will paint the inside of my second wing at the front, and it will therefore be the painter who will paint the inside and not me .
But this painter / bodybuilder has too small a paint booth and he can't paint it, so I keep looking for a bodybuilder / painter :) 
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I also found the "nuts retainers", they are different from the original models as you can see on the picture but they are very solid.
I bought what Smartin found :) 
 
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So here is the news of the work, it is ready to go to paint and I will soon send the saddlery to the saddler.
During this time, I will take care of the few odds and ends that I will have to do :) 
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Sebastian,  You do great work.  For your information, when your car body went down the line, the  trunk lid and doors were attached to the car body.  Everything that did not get out of the way would have been painted body color. The only real difference would have been if the car was ordered with the option code to have a white roof.  Everything in the trunk inside the doors, etc... would have been body color. 

 

If it was a Flint built car, the body would have been done at the Fisher Body Plant and the front fenders and hood would have been painted at the Buick Flint assembly plant.  Everything would have been put together at the assembly plant.  I know, I was there.

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On 10/25/2020 at 2:12 AM, Larry Schramm said:

Sebastian,  You do great work.  For your information, when your car body went down the line, the  trunk lid and doors were attached to the car body.  Everything that did not get out of the way would have been painted body color. The only real difference would have been if the car was ordered with the option code to have a white roof.  Everything in the trunk inside the doors, etc... would have been body color. 

 

If it was a Flint built car, the body would have been done at the Fisher Body Plant and the front fenders and hood would have been painted at the Buick Flint assembly plant.  Everything would have been put together at the assembly plant.  I know, I was there.

 

Thank you and thank you very much for all of this information.
It was not easy to find information on the colors, that's why I painted the inside of the trunk black.
There is written "fisher body" on the aluminum rods on the door sills of the car.
Were you in the Buick factories in 1969 !? :) how was it? did you have pictures? :)
Did you have any information or stories about this model (Electra) in 1969? :)
Thank you ;) 

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Sebastian,

I was in high school in '69, but all of my family worked for GM in Flint.  I was in the assembly plant lots of times.  The "aluminum rods" as you call them are actually called "sill plates".  The Fisher brothers (there were 7) actually had a body building company over 100 years ago and supplied car bodies to GM as did a number of other companies.  GM eventually bought the company and the company became a division of GM.  The division was responsible for all of the body development activities for GM up to the 1980's when Roger Smith started the destruction of GM and eliminated the division.  I worked for GM in various divisions from 1972 to 2008 when I retired.  I could tell you lots of stories since the family started working for GM in 1914. 

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On 10/28/2020 at 3:04 AM, Larry Schramm said:

Sebastian,

I was in high school in '69, but all of my family worked for GM in Flint.  I was in the assembly plant lots of times.  The "aluminum rods" as you call them are actually called "sill plates".  The Fisher brothers (there were 7) actually had a body building company over 100 years ago and supplied car bodies to GM as did a number of other companies.  GM eventually bought the company and the company became a division of GM.  The division was responsible for all of the body development activities for GM up to the 1980's when Roger Smith started the destruction of GM and eliminated the division.  I worked for GM in various divisions from 1972 to 2008 when I retired.  I could tell you lots of stories since the family started working for GM in 1914. 

 

Yes I see that you have known the GM group well :) , I translated the serial number of my Buick and I saw that it was made in Michigan (like many Buick, Cadillac, ...) , is that the flint factory you were talking about ? 
Do you have pictures of the 1969 Buick being manufactured in the factories ?
Mine was equipped with a front disc brake (Bendix), it was a rare option. Do you have any information on this ?
Thank you :)

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Sebastian,

 

Sorry, but I do not have any pictures of the cars in the factory.  At the time when the factories did tours and family days, it was just another day of visiting my Dad or other friends & relatives in the plant.  It was amazing at the time to see how the cars were being built and even more so to watch all of the parts come together and have the car start and drive away at the end of the line.

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