Delbert Stallings

oil pressure

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I agree with Caddy........running that pressure isn't going to hurt the pump but it's hard on the gears that drive it....... :wacko:

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I have had some success. Checked the gasket on the oil pump. It came with the gasket kit for that engine. I cut a new gasket from kitchen parchment paper with a thin wipe of liquid gasket for good measure and to hold the parchment paper in place. I polished the bottom plate to a smooth finish. Now my oil pressure still starts at 35lbs but only drops to around 20lbs. Since the engine was completely rebuilt, could it be that the oil pressure relief spring bolt was not turned in tight enough? It is a 1930 DeSoto CK6 engine, same set up as most early mopar sixes. The oil used is Shell rotella T 15-40 oil since I have an external oil filter. Thanks for your help

Rick VanOene

1930 DeSoto CK6 6wheel rumbleseat coupe

Edited by ckowner (see edit history)
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I would think that high pressure like that could cut grooves in the Babbitt bearings pretty quick.

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Considering the Buick has an 8+ qt  system, one bottle of STP gives 1/2 the result of that in a modern 4-5 qt system.

 

Years ago when I worked at a used car dealership, we always used a 3/8" nut in the pressure relief valve on "old" cars that came in with "low" oil pressure.

Usually '48-'55 Chrysler products.

 

Been driving the Buick with this set up for 5 years now and no issues.

 

Mike in Colorado

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With really thick oil the oil pressure relief valve probably couldn't bleed off enough oil to control the pressure when cold.

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I recently had my 226 G overhauled. it ;lost oil pressure shortly after start up, I ended up having a machine shop machine the oil pump body to 0.015 total clearance of the internal gears and body with the paper thin gaskets. I now have at idle 30 pounds pressure and nearly 50 pounds at about 2500 rpm 

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On ‎7‎/‎3‎/‎2016 at 2:12 AM, Tinindian said:

I would think that high pressure like that could cut grooves in the Babbitt bearings pretty quick.

Oil won't groove Babbitt.

 

Herm.

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On ‎6‎/‎14‎/‎2016 at 3:14 PM, Delbert Stallings said:

My 1926 Buick Standard has 25# oil pressure cold that drops to 0 when hot. I have the oil pan off and the pump apart but I see nothing wrong.  Could any one tell me what I could possibly do to help this problem???

 

 

Delbert  Stallings

Delbert, as I think it was a Ben has said, check your bearing clearance. If the clearance is to large, there is no fix until you do.

 

Set at .001 thousandths per inch of shaft.  A 2" crank would take .002 clearance, minimum, and plus 1/2 thousandths Maximum which would be .002-50.

 

Run with 30Wt. summer, 20Wt. winter

 

Herm.

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herm111     Are you putting another "fact" into the category of "old wives tales" or "old mechanics facts"???   I have discovered that many many things that I was told were true forty, fifty or sixty years ago were absolutely not.   My Grandfather was a fine man, a truck driver, a man who could fix almost anything.  His technical knowledge was all at the school of hard knocks so I am not surprised to have found some of his theory to be false.  The ones I am upset about are the "Auto Shops" teachers who have miss led so many of us.  In my mid seventies, and one week retired, I am still a voracious reader and my favorite new old book is a "Machinery's Handbook" published in 1942.  I suppose modern welding has surpassed the latest information in this book but is certainly a good basis for information.  Of course all the mathematical tables and charts and gearing and allowances and tolerances are still valid.

I once read that it's not the things we don't know that cause us trouble, it's the things that we know that aren't so.

Thanks herm111

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On ‎8‎/‎6‎/‎2016 at 5:23 PM, Tinindian said:

herm111     Are you putting another "fact" into the category of "old wives tales" or "old mechanics facts"???   I have discovered that many many things that I was told were true forty, fifty or sixty years ago were absolutely not.   My Grandfather was a fine man, a truck driver, a man who could fix almost anything.  His technical knowledge was all at the school of hard knocks so I am not surprised to have found some of his theory to be false.  The ones I am upset about are the "Auto Shops" teachers who have miss led so many of us.  In my mid seventies, and one week retired, I am still a voracious reader and my favorite new old book is a "Machinery's Handbook" published in 1942.  I suppose modern welding has surpassed the latest information in this book but is certainly a good basis for information.  Of course all the mathematical tables and charts and gearing and allowances and tolerances are still valid.

I once read that it's not the things we don't know that cause us trouble, it's the things that we know that aren't so.

Thanks herm111

Mr. Tinindian, if there is a message in your post for me, I can't seem to find it. I do know I don't do old wives tales, but I have chased a few.

 

Herm.

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herm111 I was just commenting on how many of the things that I/we were taught when we were young weren't right. :)

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On 6/18/2016 at 11:03 AM, Delbert Stallings said:

This is the bottom plate of the oil pump, there is some vey lite wear from the gears that lay right on the plate.  Are the gears supposed to lay right on the plate? The plate is brass although the picture doesn't show it.

 

IMG_1146.JPG

IMG_1147.JPGI agree

 

On 6/18/2016 at 11:03 AM, Delbert Stallings said:

I AGREE WITH hchris

 

A sheet of flat thick glass, such as in your side windows, gives a nice flat surface on which you can lay a sheet of fine grade wet and dry abrasive paper, or grinding paste.

Put the scored surface of the oil pump plate on the abrasive surface and move it firmly in figure 8 movements, to wear down the grooves, to the point that the surface of the plate is nice  and smooth, wipe the plate surface regularly to remove any residue. Make sure all the pump surfaces are nice and clean prior to re installing.

Clearances within the pump are critical if you want to maintain good oil pressure, as mentioned .005" clearance would be the maximum

acceptable between gear and wall of the pump, .003" between the gear teeth and .005" between the end plate and gears; given that you have what I would consider excessive wear on the end plate, you probably need to go through the whole of the pump or perhaps find an acceptable

replacement. 

with hchris: 

 

 

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