Martini13

FS Buick 1931 model 8.64 Roadster

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Mint condition 1931 8/64 Buick Roadster. Newly restored and in mint condition. 

 

Actual car was featured in famous Italian classic car racing magazine "Ruote-Classiche" (see article and pictures attached). 

 

Car is currently in Italy, near Milan.

 

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Edited by Martini13
More pictures (see edit history)

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Well, since your market may be in the United States, someone would be somewhat of a gambler to fly over to find out the price "face to face", and realize it's much more than the car is worth.

 

You'd do a lot better posting a price, and then seeing if anyone is interested.  Nice car, but it's not a Classic, and while not common, examples can be had without the burden of shipping costs.

 

Good luck with your sale, it is an attractive car.

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I dont know the price fir this model in usa

 

so Martini, how were you planning on selling your car then?

just a question, because if you dont know, how will anyone else know?

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Is the market that decide if a price is ok

anyway i am asking to american ppl which is the correct price in usa market for this type of car

its simple

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Used cars up to about 10 years old are simple, anything older not so much. Unless there are several public sales of identical or near identical cars over the last year for comparison the starting price can have a wide range.  There is no defined market price for your car.  I doubt more that 5 or 6 have been sold in the last several years, and often the sales price is not public knowledge. It's definitely a nice car. At say $50,000.00 it would probably sell quickly. At $100,000.00  it would probably take a long time to sell {perhaps years}.  As you can see that's a pretty wide range , but neither the high or low extreme are "outrageous" .  It's probably safe to assume the price you have in mind falls between these two figures, why make things difficult and keep it a secret ? You are already at a disadvantage with the car being in Europe {for a North American sale at least}, why make things even less attractive by playing games with the price ? It's a Buick not a Bugatti after all.

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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11 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

Used cars up to about 10 years old are simple, anything older not so much. Unless there are several public sales of identical or near identical cars over the last year for comparison the starting price can have a wide range.  There is no defined market price for your car.  I doubt more that 5 or 6 have been sold in the last several years, and often the sales price is not public knowledge. It's definitely a nice car. At say $50,000.00 it would probably sell quickly. At $100,000.00  it would probably take a long time to sell {perhaps years}.  As you can see that's a pretty wide range , but neither the high or low extreme are "outrageous" .  It's probably safe to assume the price you have in mind falls between these two figures, why make things difficult and keep it a secret ? You are already at a disadvantage with the car being in Europe {for a North American sale at least}, why make things even less attractive by playing games with the price ? It's a Buick not a Bugatti after all.

Greg in Canada

Amen,  not many around, but it's not a Bugatti...................

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Thanks for the feedback! 

 

I have updated the listing with some more photos of interior and engine.

 

After some discussion, setting the price at $90,000.

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You're far over-priced.  With the location and color scheme even $50k would be difficult to realize, don't spend that money yet.

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Um, with the pictures, it looks to be a very nice driver, $90,000, um yep you are outer atmosphere high. 

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Mint condition 1931 8/64 Buick Roadster. Newly restored and in mint condition.   -   How old is the restoration??

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15 hours ago, Joe in Canada said:

Mint condition 1931 8/64 Buick Roadster. Newly restored and in mint condition.   -   How old is the restoration??

 

 

Um good driver................. It's a nice car, but it needs to be restored again to be mint and done completely this time.................  It's a good driver

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We also have to bear in mind the European market is generally priced higher than here in North America. It might not be too far off the mark to someone in Europe. Look at all the cars that have left N. America over the last 20 years. For the most part it's because they are less expensive here and someone can either get a car for their own use at less cost than buying one in Europe, or can resell it in Europe at a profit.

 $90,000.00 is quite high here, but in Holland or Germany might be seen as more realistic.

Greg in Canada

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The Euro isn't quite at parity, but it's not too far off, so that $90K US is almost  €80K, which will buy a lot of cars.  The huge buying craze was when the dollar was really struggling against the Euro, and a $50K car here was only about  €30K.  Made a lot of cars in America very attractive to the Europeans.   This would be a nice driver, but with stained top and varnish coming off top wood, along with paint issues in the close-ups, it's hard to think it was "mint" five years ago.  Sure would be a fun car for someone....

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I have serious mixed feelings about commenting here. I do not like appraising other people's cars. And for the most part, I do NOT like most appraisers. A long-time close personal friend of mine is an exception, and one of the few that understands some of the real intricacies of antique automobile values.

Now that you know me, and my dirty little secret, let me try to explain.

 

The exchange rate between the USA dollar and the Euro is only one of several issues concerning the value of this car. The old saying about real estate values is that the most important factor is "location, location, location!"  To a lesser extent, the same is true with collector cars. Added to that, are certain facts of history. A little thing called World War II got in the way. Nobody knows just how many cars from the 1910s, '20s, and '30s were destroyed by war, confiscated, or scrapped for the war efforts, and by both sides. Even in the Americas, millions of historic cars were sacrificed for the war efforts. I am sure that the survival rates of older cars in Europe were far worse than for cars here. The result of that, is that Europeans with money in more recent decades have had to go overseas to find many cars of the vintage that they want (often either North or South America). The supply of European cars is simply a bit short, because of history. I personally have known many people and cars to have sold to Europe. There is NO resentment on my part for any of this. It is merely a fact of the world markets and economy.

Another simple fact of the world markets, and economy, is that there were, are, and always will be, a considerable cost (or expense) to shipping cars halfway around the world. Even within the continental United States, the value of a car can vary a few thousand dollars based solely on where it is located. For people like me, on very limited budgets, location alone can affect the value of a car by nearly 50 percent just because of the cost to ship it halfway across the continent. For people that collect really valuable cars, that few thousand dollars is still a major consideration, although to a lesser degree. For people that can afford it, and living where the vintage cars they want are not available? The cost of shipping does out of necessity become a way of life. Unfortunately. The reverse does not become true. Once a car has been shipped out of its basic homeland, it is not so likely that someone can justify the expense to ship it back simply because they would like it brought back. While exchange rates may affect the value some, they likely will not change that cost enough to overcome the supply shortage in Europe, coupled with the cost of shipping again. That Buick, and most of the Ford model Ts and Studebakers that have been shipped to Europe will probably always be worth more there than they will be here.

 

Another issue affecting the value of any collectible automobile.

Okay, let us face it, and admit it. We are social creatures. While our main concern with collecting historic automobiles may be intellectual, and the connection they give us to our history and heritage. We also favor the cars that fit into the clubs that are available to us. And that in turn affects their value. Given the region of the world I live in, and my own personal preferences, I lean towards earlier cars, model T Fords and pre-1916 horseless carriages (as we call them here). Many people prefer later muscle cars, sports cars, or the in-between nickel or classic eras.

Now. I am a bit "out of my arena" here with a 1931. But a major effect on value for cars of that era is whether or not the Classic Car Club of America will accept it or not. I do not know the final answer to that one. The CCCA limits their acceptance to higher end marques or top of the line models of medium marques. Lower end marques are totally out, and Buick is a medium range marque. There ARE a few model exceptions. However, MOST Buicks are not accepted by the CCCA. You should check with them (they can also be consulted through one of this discussion forum's many sub-forums). Whether or not the CCCA will fully accept a given Buick or not will affect its value by about $10,000 within the USA. Sorry, just a fact of life. That factor alone could make the difference between selling it back to the USA or not.

 

It is a beautiful roadster! Even if it is "only" a Buick. The fact is, Buick always did build excellent cars relative to their era. As collector cars, that actually is one of the problems with them. They were an excellent value in their price range when new, and excellent cars to drive as antiques today. But there are a lot of them around. And that, in the real world, does affect its dollar value somewhat, both positively, and negatively.

Your target market is probably mostly around Europe.

Drive carefully, and enjoy! W2

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If it were not for World War II, there'd be tens of thousands more pre-war collector cars in existence now.  Even now, though, there are many more collector cars than there are collectors.  This is evidenced by two facts, the first being that most collectors own more than one car (and sometimes hundreds), and there are thousands, and probably tens of thousands, of collector cars for sale by dealers and individuals.

 

No, this car is not a Full Classic, by CCCA definition.  If it were a Model 90, the asking price might be correct.  My personal belief is that the asking price is high for the American market, I have no real feel for what American made cars are being sold for in Europe.  That said, an owner can ask what he or she wishes to ask, and let the chips (or Euros) fall where they may....

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