KatiesPD

Glove Box

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Anyone know a source for rebuilding the glove box for a '33 PD? Ours is a bit ratty.

 

Thanks

 

Steve

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If you have the original and if it's fairly complete, it could be remade. I made my own for my '36 Dodge complete with the flocked liner using the door panel board and headliner material.

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These days, if someone has an original, it could be scanned by a laser and then 3D printed. Or, it could be measured out, drawn in cad and then 3D printed. Some interesting options these days on stuff like this.

 

Do you have access to an original that could be used as a template?

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Jim Page should be receiving my original sometime today so he can make a new one for me.

 

It is not plumb nor square after the mice got through with it so the scan might be a bit skewed. ;)

 

Looking forward to see what Jim can do.

 

No pressure Jim:)

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On 6/6/2016 at 9:21 AM, KatiesPD said:

Anyone know a source for rebuilding the glove box for a '33 PD? Ours is a bit ratty.

 

Thanks

 

Steve

Any picture of your car, I had a nice 2 Door,

 

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Received the new glove box last Friday and gave it to Katie for Christmas.

 

Jim Page did a great job fabricating the new box from the patterns from our old mouse eaten original.

 

Here are shots of the original and the new

 

Thanks Jim

iPad 033.JPG

iPad 035.JPG

014.JPG

015.JPG

012.JPG

016.JPG

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Can basically build one from thin light wood and just line it with felt. or build some felted board like the original and cut and staple one up. 

Then add resin and maybe fiberglass the outside to make a nice hard shell.

 

Just an FYI for people pushing 3D printing. And not to blast that particular post, just everyone learning and using 3D printing.

 

3D printed plastics even printed ABS will sag over time and the tech has not advanced enough to say it will have long term durability.

 

Old world craftsmanship still wins the battle for creating lasting parts for old cars. (stuff you see on TV, doesn't count)

 

I have been working in 3D and 3D printed parts for over 10-15 years. I have access to some of the most advanced printers.  We tool up parts, machine parts, everything.

In the end the old model maker in the corner still wins most of the battles.

 

3D printing is just another tool in the toolbox.

 

Also the act of creating these templates or art or scanning cost $$$, a lot of people don't want to pay for this service, they just want to part for the part they are getting. 

 

Either way just hand make it or buy the 70.00 copy.

 

sorry for the rant, it is what it is..

 

I took a 2 min search and found on ebay item, 172460608491  for 40.00 look a bit different from the one above, however, you should as the seller if the make one for a 1933 model. Or ask for the dimensions and see if this is close enough to modify.

Edited by Abe Lugo (see edit history)

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Most glove boxes are make for specific years and vary according to body style. My '36 box is very different from this '33 box and I had not seen one like it before. It is made of 2 layers of a pressed cardstock instead of one as most boxes are due to the sharp angles to fit the taper of the cowling. This was a challenge to get 2 layers to match up close enough to fit together properly. The real difficulty is in the original pattern being so badly damaged and distorted with some missing parts. It took several tries to finally come up with  patterns that fit close enough. I did entertain the idea of modifying the design so as not to have to make so many bends, but then I decided to try to keep it as original as possible.The other issue is, without a clicker die or press, it's difficult to score and bend the panel board in a 90 deg. angle without some tearing of the paper and because of the stiffness of the board it's hard to maintain a proper shape. I chose to glue this box together instead of stapling as my stapler did not have a deep enough throat to get to all the seams. I also thought that the glue would make the box sturdier. Without having the dash in possession, there is no way to guarantee a good fit, and I do hope it fits well without a lot of alteration. I admit it looks a little rough on the outside, but by using original type materials it looks almost identical to the original from the inside. This box was kind of an experiment for me, a challenge of design and skill to see if I could do it, to help a hobbyist. Sure we can let technology take over but if we rely  on technology to do the thinking and work for us but how soon until we lose all of our ability to think and do things for ourselves. I feel that these kinds of challenges are the driving force behind doing restoration work, rebuilding the past with our own 2 hands and imagination and the satisfaction of of a completed task!

 

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On 1/7/2017 at 9:46 PM, Abe Lugo said:

Can basically build one from thin light wood and just line it with felt. or build some felted board like the original and cut and staple one up. 

Then add resin and maybe fiberglass the outside to make a nice hard shell.

 

Just an FYI for people pushing 3D printing. And not to blast that particular post, just everyone learning and using 3D printing.

 

3D printed plastics even printed ABS will sag over time and the tech has not advanced enough to say it will have long term durability.

 

Old world craftsmanship still wins the battle for creating lasting parts for old cars. (stuff you see on TV, doesn't count)

 

I have been working in 3D and 3D printed parts for over 10-15 years. I have access to some of the most advanced printers.  We tool up parts, machine parts, everything.

In the end the old model maker in the corner still wins most of the battles.

 

3D printing is just another tool in the toolbox.

 

Also the act of creating these templates or art or scanning cost $$$, a lot of people don't want to pay for this service, they just want to part for the part they are getting. 

 

Either way just hand make it or buy the 70.00 copy.

 

sorry for the rant, it is what it is..

 

I took a 2 min search and found on ebay item, 172460608491  for 40.00 look a bit different from the one above, however, you should as the seller if the make one for a 1933 model. Or ask for the dimensions and see if this is close enough to modify.

Hi Abe

looking for outside door handles drivers side 34 Dodge Dr, if you know of any or anyone that may have let me know thanks

Steve / knobless

 

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Knobless, those come up frequenly on ebay, you have to settle for Plymouth ones as a standby until you find the right one. Just keep an auto search going for them

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Installed the new glove box yesterday!! Nearly perfect fit just a little finesse to get the holes lined up. Jim did a great job building this.

 

Thanks Jim!!!

 

Steve

DSC_2052.JPG

IMG_1523.JPG

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looks great,can you post a pic of the whole dash interesting to see other '33 dashes

 

Did you end up getting the box off of ebay?

 

 

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NICE! You should be able to find little rubber snubbers for that glove box door at an auto parts store on the rack.

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Rubber snubbers? So that's what goes in those little holes. :)

 

No Abe this was a custom reproduction from our own Jim Page. I'll get a full dash shot when it warms up a bit. Fits great and looks terrific.

 

FYI I have more pics of the car in my gallery Katies33PD

 

Steve

Edited by KatiesPD (see edit history)

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Rubber snubbers....pull the tapered end through from the front until it anchors in the groove.

Picture 22993.jpg

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On 1/28/2017 at 2:55 PM, keiser31 said:

Rubber snubbers....pull the tapered end through from the front until it anchors in the groove.

Picture 22993.jpg

 

 

Edited by knobless
Wrong info (see edit history)

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