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Which States have the best license plate program for antique cars?

 

I have an opportunity to draft and propose legislation in New York to my State representatives, so I would like to learn from other successful and hobby friendly States what has worked well for us hobbyists.

 

thanks,

Don

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You also might try (please no comments) the National Street Rod Association. They have what's called their "Safety 23" program. Some states have adopted this in their licensing of antique cars and street rod's.

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North Carolina has some statutes you may wish to consider. Hopefully this cut and paste formatting will be OK. I have copied this from our Chapter Document that we give to all new Chapter Members as part of our new member welcome packet.

 

Excerpts from North Carolina State Statutes regarding Antique Automobiles

 

For Full Text, refer to listed web addresses

http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/gascripts/statutes/statutelookup.pl?statute=20-63

 

§ 20‑63.  Registration plates furnished by Division; requirements; replacement of regular plates with First in Flight plates; surrender and reissuance; displaying; preservation and cleaning; alteration or concealment of numbers; commission contracts for issuance.

 (d)       Registration plates issued for a motor vehicle other than a motorcycle, trailer, or semitrailer shall be attached thereto, one in the front and the other in the rear: Provided, that when only one registration plate is issued for a motor vehicle other than a truck‑tractor, said registration plate shall be attached to the rear of the motor vehicle. The registration plate issued for a truck‑tractor shall be attached to the front thereof. Provided further, that when only one registration plate is issued for a motor vehicle and this motor vehicle is transporting a substance that may adhere to the plate so as to cover or discolor the plate or if the motor vehicle has a mechanical loading device that may damage the plate, the registration plate may be attached to the front of the motor vehicle.

Any motor vehicle of the age of 35 years or more from the date of manufacture may bear the license plates of the year of manufacture instead of the current registration plates, if the current registration plates are maintained within the vehicle and produced upon the request of any person.

The Division shall provide registered owners of motorcycles and motorcycle trailers with suitably reduced size registration plates….

 

http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/gascripts/statutes/statutelookup.pl?statute=20-79.4

 

§ 20‑79.4.  Special registration plates.

(a)        General. – Upon application and payment of the required registration fees, a person may obtain from the Division a special registration plate for a motor vehicle registered in that person's name if the person qualifies for the registration plate. A holder of a special registration plate who becomes ineligible for the plate, for whatever reason, must return the special plate within 30 days. A special registration plate may not be issued for a vehicle registered under the International Registration Plan. A special registration plate may be issued for a commercial vehicle that is not registered under the International Registration Plan. A special registration plate may not be developed using a name or logo for which a trademark has been issued unless the holder of the trademark licenses, without charge, the State to use the name or logo on the special registration plate.

 (b)        Types. – The Division shall issue the following types of special registration plates:…

 

(90)      Historic Vehicle Owner. - Issuable for a motor vehicle that is at least 35 years old measured from the date of manufacture. The plate for an historic vehicle shall bear the word "Antique" unless the vehicle is a model year 1943 or older. The plate for a vehicle that is a model year 1943 or older shall bear the word "Antique" or the words "Horseless Carriage", at the option of the vehicle owner.

 

http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/gascripts/statutes/statutelookup.pl?statute=20-183.2

 

§ 20‑183.2.  Description of vehicles subject to safety or emissions inspection; definitions.

(a)        Safety. – A motor vehicle is subject to a safety inspection in accordance with this Part if it meets all of the following requirements:

(1)        It is subject to registration with the Division under Article 3 of this Chapter.

(2)        It is not subject to inspection under 49 C.F.R. Part 396, the federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations.

(3)        It is not a trailer whose gross weight is less than 4,000 pounds or a house trailer.

(a1)      Safety Inspection Exceptions. – The following vehicles shall not be subject to a safety inspection pursuant to this Article:

(1)        Historic vehicles, as described in G.S. 20-79.4(b)(88).)...

 

 

http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/gascripts/statutes/statutelookup.pl?statute=105-330.9

 

§  105-330.9.  Antique automobiles.

(a)        Definition. - For the purpose of this section, the term "antique automobile" means a motor vehicle that meets all of the following conditions:

(1)        It is registered with the Division of Motor Vehicles and has an historic vehicle special license plate under G.S. 20-79.4.

(2)        It is maintained primarily for use in exhibitions, club activities, parades, and other public interest functions.

(3)        It is used only occasionally for other purposes.

(4)        It is owned by an individual.

(5)        It is used by the owner for a purpose other than the production of income and is not used in connection with a business.

(b)        Classification. - Antique automobiles are designated a special class of property under Article V, Sec. 2(2) of the North Carolina Constitution and must be assessed for taxation in accordance with this section. An antique automobile must be assessed at the lower of its true value or five hundred dollars ($500.00).  (1995, c 512, s 2; 2009-445, s. 24(a); 2013-414, s. 70(b).)

 

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2 hours ago, D Bosco said:

Which States have the best license plate program for antique cars? ...

thanks,

Don

 

Don, are you asking specifically about license PLATES;

or more generally about antique-car licensing and inspection, emissions testing,

and various other related issues?  If your question is more specific, maybe

we can address your concerns more precisely.

 

Pennsylvania, home of the A.A.C.A., is very friendly to antique cars,

so there are lots of them here--and consequently lots of antique-car-related businesses.

I know New York has inspections of antique cars, which can be a real nuisance for

those having quite a few cars that each get driven only a couple of times a year.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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Florida is, well, different

https://m.flsenate.gov/Statutes/320.086

320.086 Ancient or antique motor vehicles; horseless carriage, antique, or historical license plates; former military vehicles.—

(1) The owner of a motor vehicle for private use manufactured in model year 1945 or earlier and operated on the streets and highways of this state shall, upon application in the manner and at the time prescribed by the department and upon payment of the license tax for an ancient motor vehicle prescribed by s. 320.08(1)(d), (2)(a), or (3)(e), be issued a special license plate for such motor vehicle. The license plate shall be permanent and valid for use without renewal so long as the vehicle is in existence. In addition to the payment of all other fees required by law, the applicant shall pay such fee for the issuance of the special license plate as may be prescribed by the department commensurate with the cost of its manufacture. The registration numbers and special license plates assigned to such motor vehicles shall run in a separate numerical series, commencing with “Horseless Carriage No. 1,” and the plates shall be of a distinguishing color.

(2)(a) The owner of a motor vehicle for private use manufactured in a model year after 1945 and of the age of 30 years or more after the model year and operated on the streets and highways of this state may, upon application in the manner and at the time prescribed by the department and upon payment of the license tax prescribed by s. 320.08(1)(d), (2)(a), or (3)(e), be issued a special license plate for such motor vehicle. In addition to the payment of all other fees required by law, the applicant shall pay the fee for the issuance of the special license plate prescribed by the department, commensurate with the cost of its manufacture. The registration numbers and special license plates assigned to such motor vehicles shall run in a separate numerical series, commencing with “Antique No. 1,” and the plates shall be of a distinguishing color. The owner of the motor vehicle may, upon application and payment of the license tax prescribed by s. 320.08, be issued a regular Florida license plate or specialty license plate in lieu of the special “Antique” license plate

https://m.flsenate.gov/Statutes/320.08

SECTION 08 License taxes. (1d is for motorcycles, 3e trucks, both are $7.50)
(2) AUTOMOBILES OR TRI-VEHICLES FOR PRIVATE USE.—
(a) An ancient or antique automobile, as defined in s. 320.086, or a street rod, as defined in s. 320.0863: $7.50 flat.

 

also

http://www.flhsmv.gov/dmv/forms/BTR/83045.pdf

(4) Any person who is the registered owner of a motor vehicle as defined in this section and manufactured in the model year 1974 or earlier may apply to the department for permission to use a historical Florida license plate that clearly represents the model year of the vehicle as a personalized prestige license plate. This plate shall be furnished by such person and shall be presented to the department with a reasonable fee to be determined by the department for approval and for authentication that the historic license plate and any applicable decals were issued by this state in the same year as the model year of the car or truck. The requirements of s. 320.0805(8)(b) do not apply to historical plates authorized under this subsection.

 

In 1975 Florida switched from yearly plates to semi-permanent plates with stickers to indicate yearly registration.

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Despite all our other problems Wisconsin has a great deal for "ANTIQUE" plate licensing.

It's quite restrictive but it's a one time charge which is REALLY cheap. I don't recall if there are additional fees on the forms but I think it's $10......period.

http://wisconsindot.gov/Pages/dmv/vehicles/title-plates/antique.aspx

Needless to say I venture to say nearly all cars thusly licensed sees a LOT of maintenance....... :unsure: ......I know my '19 T Touring does....... ;) 

Another far less restrictive (practically none) option is "COLLECTOR" plates which carry a one time charge of $200 for the first vehicle and $150 thereafter.

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Quote

(b)        Classification. - Antique automobiles are designated a special class of property under Article V, Sec. 2(2) of the North Carolina Constitution and must be assessed for taxation in accordance with this section. An antique automobile must be assessed at the lower of its true value or five hundred dollars ($500.00).  (1995, c 512, s 2; 2009-445, s. 24(a); 2013-414, s. 70(b).)

 

I just went thru this exercise in NC. The efficiency will make you lose your mind. Once you purchase the Antique plate from the DMV (State), you have to file it with the County tax office in order to receive the $500 valuation in future years. In the last year, the tax value on my 73 Cadillac was doubled, so I should realize some savings going forward.

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carolinagreg,

 

If you paid tax for a valuation over $500, you should file an appeal of the valuation. Some County Tax offices simply value all antique at $500, and some make an effort to collect more than prescribed by the statute and you have to challenge them on it. That is not a reflection of the state law but of the individual running the particular county tax office.

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In NZ all cars share the same license plate system. All cars must be licensed to be on the road. The fee is reduced considerably for vehicles over 30 years old, probably because of reduced accident compensation cover levy. All cars over 12 years old have a 6 monthly safety inspection resulting in a Warrant of Fitness sticker displayed on the windscreen. Cars between three and 12 years old have an annual safety inspection. The first safety inspection after that when new is at 3 years old. I think we can buy 3, 6 and 12 month licenses. If you only want to drive it in the summer, then get a WoF and license it for the relevant period.

 

We can drive our cars anywhere and any time we like.

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In Ohio as I am currently going through the process, we have the option of one time fee on Historical Plates of about $20 with a model year plate option for an additional  $5. You must bring the model year plates to the DMV when applying and must carry the historical plates in the car. Under this program, you can not use the car for general transportation for work/shopping just shows, cruise ins, parades, tours, club activities, public interest events and exercise runs. At least that is way I see it but best to check out the Ohio DMV site for details.

 

Tom Muth

Cincinnati, Ohio

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32 minutes ago, joe_padavano said:

So that we can avoid having fifty different posts in this thread, you can simply go to the SEMA Tag and Title Toolbox, where they cover the licensing and registration requirements in all fifty states. 

 

He wants our opinions of what works, not a list of the laws (which I am sure he already has). That list is handy for factual info, but is useless for opinions on what works and what doesn't. He want's to draft laws that work, not just mimic what is enacted.

 

We finally have YOM (year of manufacture in Colorado. They give you a new plate (# issued by the sate) that you have to keep in the car. That is a waste of time and money. The YOM plate number can't be in use so why would they need another plate? No personalized plates are available for the antique plates. I  believe that an inspection should be done on any car especially older cars. The one problem I see are people using antique plates on a car that qualifies for the age, but is a POS that is poorly maintained at best. They should not just be old, but to be on the road they should be safe. 

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23 minutes ago, Amphicar BUYER said:

 

He wants our opinions of what works, not a list of the laws (which I am sure he already has). That list is handy for factual info, but is useless for opinions on what works and what doesn't. He want's to draft laws that work, not just mimic what is enacted.

 

We finally have YOM (year of manufacture in Colorado. They give you a new plate (# issued by the sate) that you have to keep in the car. That is a waste of time and money. The YOM plate number can't be in use so why would they need another plate? No personalized plates are available for the antique plates. I  believe that an inspection should be done on any car especially older cars. The one problem I see are people using antique plates on a car that qualifies for the age, but is a POS that is poorly maintained at best. They should not just be old, but to be on the road they should be safe. 

 

Many of the posts here have simply linked to a particular state's DMV site.

In any case, anecdotal information on how one individual may or may not have been able to navigate a particular state's laws is unfortunately not complete information. We've all had dealings with the DMV where the particular people at the DMV were either very helpful or incompetent.  Neither situation is an adequate picture of the adequacy of the actual law - it's unfortunately only a snapshot of one person's knowledge of the law.  I've personally interacted with DMV employees who got something through despite the law - that's unfortunately not the experience you want if you are actually writing the law. A single exception to the rule is not an especially good indication of how the state's laws are working.

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I would be very leery of big bother and expensive annual inspections that those of us with multiple cars would be forced to "thinning the herd".  In Ohio we have surprise inspections set up at different places and times around the state. We also required all licensed cars to be insured that is enforced at traffic stops or random checks from the DMV.  I think that is better way of dealing with clunkers that are driven daily. I personally call out anyone I see using historical plates on a daily driver.  In addition,  I believe police can stop cars that have apparent issues like tail lights out that can result in further inspections. I now have 10 collector cars after recently inheriting 5 from my father that are licensed  with Historical plates and insured with a collector car insurance company. Two of the cars do not run due to minor issues hopefully carb or electrical on 09 Maxwell and 12 Buick but one a 48 Caddy convt has not been run since 1968 and needs a lot of mechanical issues addressed before it could be a nice HPOF car. If it was 91 Honda, it would be considered a clunker as the interior has been destroyed by mice and the chrome is bad. I think self policing in the hobby is better way to deal with collector cars. I know some clubs require tour participants to sign that their cars are in good condition and/or inspections at the start of tour.

 

Tom Muth

 

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I dont know about other states, but California has penalties that accrue on vehicles when their registration has lapsed. Lincoln collecor Jack Passey fought to remove this penalty fee for historical vehicles because many cars that had historical significance were junked because the fees that were due on them were more than the car was worth. This most likely wont be the case in modern times as the cars have gone up in value. However, if you have a 1965 car with 800 dollars of fees due on it and its sitting in a field, you will seriously consider not saving the car (depending on what it is) but if you register it as historic, you can have those fees removed and at least the car has a fighting chance.

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What do you want to change about the New York State law? I have used it for years with no problem. If you are not a hobbyist don't try to fix something you don't know about. PM me.

 

If you are in a position to propose NYS legislation do something with those state small business promoters and pass a bill requiring the state to handle accounts payable in less than 90-120 days. You'd probably end up Governor if you got the state dead beats to pay. PM me on that too!

Bernie

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1 hour ago, Amphicar BUYER said:

He wants our opinions of what works, not a list of the laws (which I am sure he already has)....

 

Well said, Amphicar Buyer!  Links to long legal descriptions might be good back-up,

but a member's brief summary of the BEST features will make this forum much

more readable!  Can we avoid the 50-line postings and give useful summaries?

 

And I wish Don would get back to us, telling us what he SPECIFICALLY wants.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Linus Tremaine said:

I dont know about other states, but California has penalties that accrue on vehicles when their registration has lapsed. Lincoln collecor Jack Passey fought to remove this penalty fee for historical vehicles because many cars that had historical significance were junked because the fees that were due on them were more than the car was worth. This most likely wont be the case in modern times as the cars have gone up in value. However, if you have a 1965 car with 800 dollars of fees due on it and its sitting in a field, you will seriously consider not saving the car (depending on what it is) but if you register it as historic, you can have those fees removed and at least the car has a fighting chance.

Linus,

    When I lived in CA, you could show the DMV that the vehicle was not operational for a given number of previous years to avoid penalties while registering a restored vehicle.

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New Jersey doesn't yet allow year-of- manufacture plates yet they have made a concession; though officially a 2-plate state (front and rear) you only must display your historic plate in the rear and can use most anything in the front.  NJ is a one-time very inexpensive fee for historic registration, good for as long as you own the car though every 3 years you must acknowledge that.  No inspection of course, we (shamefully) barely have inspection on anything, even 1996 and back are now exempt and anything newer is only subject to emissions inspection.  The written restriction for historic plates is limited to educational and display only though there seems to be no enforcement.   

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2 hours ago, tomcarnut said:

I would be very leery of big bother and expensive annual inspections that those of us with multiple cars would be forced to "thinning the herd".  In Ohio we have surprise inspections set up at different places and times around the state. We also required all licensed cars to be insured that is enforced at traffic stops or random checks from the DMV.  (SNIP)

 

I for one know a proactive effort is far better than a reactionary clean up. I have seen too many old (and newer too) cars in poor shape on the road with me. I don't want to be the guy some idiot kills (or worse) because he didn't maintain his car because he didn't have to unless he randomly got inspected. Prevent the problems, don't go fishing for them and hope for the best.

 

I used to do the annual inspections that Colorado once had for EVERY car. Now they are more concerned for the air than than safety. I failed many cars under 2 years old for things like broken windshields, inoperable safety equipment (horn, lights, seatbelts etc) and worn brakes that were on the road with us every day. These are cars I would not drive at all as they were that bad. I've seen rotors worn to the vanes, 3 of 4 headlights out, no brake lamps, tires so bald you could just about see the air in them. Are these the ones you want on the road with your children, hoping that they are the one in a 1000 that gets inspected randomly? I think not.

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Gentlemen, thanks very much for the deluge of info and comments. To John in PA's point, I am trying to put together a proposal for legislation in NY that minimizes the expense to the hobbyist/collector to keep cars on the road. This would include the legal regime for license plates, inspection etc. Some states, I understand, have a one time licensing system as long as the car stays with the owner. After I do some more homework and comparisons, I will report back to all of you on this site.

 

We should work on developing a model uniform historic motor vehicles registration and licensing law that can be adopted by each State. Maybe also grant reciprocity so that if I buy a car in NJ with year of manufacture NJ plates, I can keep the same plates on the car in NY. Probably unworkable but lets assemble some new ideas to make it easier and cheaper for us collectors!

Thanks to all.

Don

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I'm sure open to anything that makes it easier and cheaper ... REASONABLE! I'm sure there are far more evil states than Colo or NJ when it comes to old car licence plates and related. At least there should be some uniformity so it's not a crap shoot at every DMV. 

 

Good on you for taking it on!

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In New York State I pay $28 annually to register each car with the option of using YOM plates when illegible and properly insured. Each car requires a New York State safety inspection at a licensed vehicle inspection station at $12 to $20 a pop. I can't fill my gas tank for my New York State collector car ownership taxes and fees. It is pretty Easy and cheap as it stands. If any level of study has been completed I would like to know what that "cheaper" figure is estimated to be.

I'm guessing some in Albany knows these costs. If they don't the words "easier and cheaper" are used by every Bait and Switch swindler and conniver out there.

 

As a voter in New York State I would say the only involvement the legislature should have with collector cars is making license plates for those who choose not to use YOM plates. God knows, they keep taking the scoundrels  away in handcuffs so the license plate production line should be running a full staff, 24/7.

 

Warning.png Bernie

BTW: The word conniver is not used frequently enough these days.

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" What do you want to change about the New York State law? I have used it for years with no problem. If you are not a hobbyist don't try to fix something you don't know about."

 

Amen. What we have works pretty good. Whatever you do leave the option open to register antique cars for daily use. If I get a Model "A" I want to be able to use it as a daily driver in nice weather - otherwise it's useless.

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One issue in Florida is that many fixable/project cars wind up with a "salvage" title and it gets much harder to register. With  a COD you have to mix parts from at least three different cars and Florida then issues a "rebuilt" VIN. The reason is simple:

"The department shall charge a fee of $ 70 for each original certificate of title,...; $ 2 for each salvage certificate of title;".

 

Salvage title cars are usually shipped elsewhere but that is why having a "clean Florida title" is often mentioned in advts.

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I agree about the salvage titles. They can really hurt an otherwise good old car and I think the "salvage" tag should have an expiration date--eventually the car will be fixed or scrapped. Having that stigma attached to it forever is a problem.

 

A few years ago I sold a 1974 Plymouth 'Cuda that was a nice restoration, but it had a salvage title. It wasn't wrecked or drowned or anything--it was apart for a restoration, there was a divorce, the wife got the car, and called the insurance company. They, of course, totaled the car since the cost of reassembling a basket case 1974 'Cuda was more than it was worth. Boom! Instant salvage title. Husband bought the car back from the insurance company and finished it, ending up with one of the straightest cars I've ever seen. We were eventually able to sell it for about 60% of its actual value to Norway, where they don't care about an Ohio "salvage" title. Buyers in the US were offering pennies on the dollar for it due to the salvage title issue. Everyone was spooked.

 

007.jpg

 

I also recently bought a car that seems to have a clean 2-year-old Ohio title. We went to put it in our name and discovered that some state somewhere in the past several decades had tagged it as "junk" (AKA salvage) and that information would appear on our new Ohio title. Apparently, it was only very recently that the DMV computers in various states started talking to each other, so the previous owner was able to get a clean title in November 2014, yet it's flagged for me in 2016. I bought the car based on the fact that it had a clean title, but now I seem to have a car with a salvage title which is worth maybe 60-70% of what it should be. I check titles carefully, it was clean otherwise I wouldn't have bought it. Now it's not clean because of some new reporting software.

 

THAT is, excuse me gentlemen, bullsh*t.

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Although I know the forum is not a place for political discussion, legislation tied to the ownership of a collector car just brings this stuff to light. An unsolicited offer of help where no problem existed sure had a Democratic party smell to me. A little research makes me believe that could be the source of the involvement. Whatever the personal perception of a problem or the perceived distress of this group of New York State constituents may be; there isn't a problem for long time hobbyists and nothing needs fixing. That may be hard to get for a party that looks on the "common" people like they were the cast of one of those 1930's black and white Charles Dickens movies, but we are not close to being that group. Find something else. Hook a windmill up to some dilapidated old inefficient building. That's a Godly act.

Bernie

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Matt: that is why I mentioned COD. In Florida there are two salvage titles: "Salvage Rebuildable" and "Salvage Certificate of Destruction". A COD title is the most common $2 title and can only be titled three times: once when issued usually to the insurance co. Once when the insurance co sells to an auction co. And the last time when the poor unknowing sap buys it at auction and finds it is only good for scrap (or export).

 

This is why I advise friend's who have an accident to never surrender their clean title unless they are giving the car up. If they negotiate a buy back and the insurance co. has the title, guess what kind of title they get. A Carfax note is one thing, a salvage titel something else entirely. (and probably should be in a different thread though comes under "legislation").

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60flattop, those of us that live in ether the five Borough's of NYC or on Long Island pay double what you pay. I just renewed my '46 Ford Wagon and it was about $60. My '32 Roadster is about $55. I too have never had a problem with NY, DMV, (if you have all the paperwork they require) that is. I know some states have a one time fee for antique vehicles because they are driven so little. Some states have a one time inspection for antique vehicles. and as you know, New Yorker's must have our car's inspected every year. I admire Mr. Bosco for wanting to take on the NY State DMV. I wish him luck.

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I am also from Pennsylvania.

 

1.  No state inspection on vehicles registered as antiques.  This is especially helpful on pre-war cars, where the inspection stations may not be familiar with the mechanics of vehicles from this era.  Example, to inspect the rear brakes on my 1933 Chevrolet requires removing the differential cover and partially removing the rear axles.  When we still had state inspections on antique cars, the mechanics could not figure this out and I never told them.  They are not familiar with mechanical brakes either.  Generally the  car owners have much more experience with maintaining cars from the era.

 

2.  PA also has a permanent registration for antique plates, car must be 25 years or older.  I time fee of $75


3.  For an additional fee (another $75) you can use a Year of Manufacture (YOM) plate obtained by the car owner rather then a new Antique / Historic Vehicle plate.  This is also a one time registration fee and the year of manufacture plate is the actual plate the car is registered with.  PA has a website to verify the number is not used on another car and valid, so you can check prior to buying a YOM plate.  No need to carry a new Antique plate inside the car to verify the vehicle is actually registered when using a YOM plate like NC and some other states require.

 

4.  PA also has one time Classic registration for cars that (I believe) are 20 years old or older, but they must be inspected annually.

 

Like I said above, generally speaking the owners of antique cars are much more knowledgable about the older cars than inspection stations and maintain them to a high level of safety.  At least in PA I have found this to be true.

 

Edited by Vila (see edit history)
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Gentlemen, thanks very much for the deluge of info and comments. To John in PA's point, I am trying to put together a proposal for legislation in NY that minimizes the expense to the hobbyist/collector to keep cars on the road. This would include the legal regime for license plates, inspection etc. Some states, I understand, have a one time licensing system as long as the car stays with the owner. After I do some more homework and comparisons, I will report back to all of you on this site.

 

We should work on developing a model uniform historic motor vehicles registration and licensing law that can be adopted by each State. Maybe also grant reciprocity so that if I buy a car in NJ with year of manufacture NJ plates, I can keep the same plates on the car in NY. Probably unworkable but lets assemble some new ideas to make it easier and cheaper for us collectors!

Thanks to all.

Don

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Yes to 46'Woodie, I am looking at a one time license plate fee and one time inspection per vehicle per owner as a starting point. There was a bill that came out of the NYS Assembly Transportation Committee providing for a $100 one time licensing fee, but it died a few years ago without going to the floor for a vote.

 

 

Also, the inspection is annual but only costs $10. However, taking a Model T Ford as an example, what can a local mechanic inspect? That the horn works, headlights go on? They have no idea how to check the brakes! The inspection is really useless.

 

 

I will work more on this in the coming week and report back here to everyone. Enjoy the Holiday weekend and remember all who served and died in support of our great Nation!!!


Don

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In PA, the so called "Classic" car must meet the age limit but must also be out of production, So say you have a '72 Camaro, it meets the age criteria but since Chevrolet still makes a Camaro, it may not be eligible for classic plates, unless that stipulation has been changed because of the companies resurrecting different models. Also, the antique plates limit usage to 1 day a week,which is a little vague in itself,cannot be used for hire and must meet all current lighting requirements for night driving. The largest hurdle I had when I registered my antique was the number of photos I had to send in to verify authenticity. They could refuse you for having non- stock wheels or any visible deviation from original. Maybe they're not as strict today as they were in '84.

Edited by jpage (see edit history)
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On 5/26/2016 at 5:01 PM, 60FlatTop said:

In New York State I pay $28 annually to register each car with the option of using YOM plates when illegible and properly insured. Each car requires a New York State safety inspection at a licensed vehicle inspection station at $12 to $20 a pop.

 

There's always room for improvement in government, whether

you live in New York, New Hampshire, or the New Hebrides.

 

Two features of Pennsylvania's law are very accommodating to

antique-car hobbyists:

 

---Permanent registration.  Pay a one-time fee of $75, and it's

registered as long as you own the car--perhaps for decades.

Registration fees likely help to maintain roads, and the antique cars

are on the road infrequently and for very limited mileage.

 

---No required state inspections.  Antique cars are maintained by their

owners, who use them infrequently and usually lavish care on them.

You don't take your tractor or your Amish buggy for annual inspections, do you?

Besides, what shop has the knowledge to assess and repair diverse cars--

maybe a 1908 Stanley steam car, a 1910 Baker Electric, a 1927 Hupmobile,

a 1940 Graham?  They are either maintained by their knowledgeable owners,

or else sent out to a specialist.  Can you imagine having a 20-car collection,

where each car gets out of the garage maybe once a year--and you have to

take your Baker Electric down to a general inspection station and park it

beside Toyotas and Hondas, just before that once-a-year ride

for ice cream?  

 

Pennsylvania's friendliness to antique cars has resulted in a booming

antique-car hobby here.  Our local region members have collections

ranging from 1 to 50 cars;  there are several well-reputed restoration

shops just within our area, and every week-end there are several

car shows to choose from. 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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When my cars go in for inspection the guys know I don't like the windshield wipers dragged across a dry windshield. We usually have a priest stop by and sprinkle Holy water on the glass before we test them. AND that's the easy part.

 

Any legislative scribe is going to have their hands full with an Irish, Catholic, Republican like me. Going back to post #35, where I see "as a starting point", to paraphrase a quote I read "I don't know what it's really supposed to mean. Start? Start heading to what end?"

 

Here is the first collector car I licensed in New York State. I was 25 and the year was 1974. Same basic deal as the five I have now, 42 years and no complaints.

002.jpg

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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