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Can someone recommend an online company where I can sell my car?


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Well I just went to the link and I see that Craig does not have his number listed there, only his salesmen's.

His number shows up on some print ads that I have seen so I know that he accepts calls. His number is 612-868-O53four.

If the price is right he may just buy. They are always buying. Must be nice.

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3 minutes ago, 28 Chrysler said:

Meet them some place public, like the DMV, a local shop, etc.

 

These days the secret meetings are more for CL ads.

The real business is online marketing.

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I listed a 1930 Austin 16/6 on Bring a Trailer. I like their auction style and how they try to make sure the people bidding actually buy the car. I am more a buyer then seller and am a little nervous about where the bidding is now but it could be helpful for you to watch and see how the bidding progresses or not. 

This is an odd car but after owning it for 5 years or more last week I saw my first similar vehicle go to auction in England with a hammer price way more then I am hoping for. It sold for 19,500 pounds which is about $28,000.00.

this is the link to my vehicle:

http://bringatrailer.com/listing/1930-austin-166/

 

And here is the one that sold in England

http://classiccars.brightwells.com/viewdetails.php?id=6480

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Speaking for myself, as a dedicated car hobbyist,

I always buy from owners--not brokers, dealers, or re-sellers.

I want to meet the owner, hear from him all the details of a

car he's had for years, assess his honesty, and get his

insights on the car.  Buying through a middleman makes it

harder or impossible to get that information--and besides,

they mark up the price, making the car more expensive.

 

This hobby is greatly enhanced by person-to-person contact.

Perhaps you iive in a high-crime area.

If you don't want people visiting your house (something which

most people selling collector cars don't worry about), perhaps

meet at a friend's house, at your place of work, or even at

the municipal police station.

 

All the best to you on your sale!

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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16 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

>>Speaking for myself, as a dedicated car hobbyist,

I always buy from owners--not brokers, dealers, or re-sellers.

I want to meet the owner, hear from him all the details of a

car he's had for years, assess his honesty, and get his

insights on the car.  Buying through a middleman makes it

harder or impossible to get that information--and besides,

they mark up the price, making the car more expensive.

 

 

 

I agree with John and am in that situation right now.  I'm shopping for a car to replace something I've recently sold.

 

To be sure there are good reputable dealers out there, but even they can't know all there is to know about a car's history. In addition, lots of these dealers or re-sellers place very high prices on cars which serves to depress the market.  The cars languish for sale at these prices for years sometimes. Getting the best price is part of the game but there's more to the hobby than money.  Otherwise, like your modern car,  it's not a hobby anymore. I will gladly give a long-time owner a generous price for a car I really want because they've earned it --- they restored, rebuilt, repaired, maintained and drove the car for many miles.  Dealers don't have the ability to provide that degree of "value added" if they buy on Monday and sell on Friday.  Maybe that's OK with used Toyotas but it's really necessary to know an old car well otherwise you could be in for major mechanical expenses.

 

So, I wish owners would try to sell privately first.  Give the little guy a shot.  Keep the hobby a hobby.

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I don't want to agree or disagree, But I see a lot of cars at shows that the owner knows nothing about.

I think there are many people out there that enjoy the hobby thru the wallet.

The guys on this sight are not the normal enthusiasts. Many of the posters are in the business and will confirm this.

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9 hours ago, JACK M said:

I don't want to agree or disagree, But I see a lot of cars at shows that the owner knows nothing about....

 

Jack, they might not be experts as to all the mechanical details,

but even some basic knowledge would be more than a dealer might have.

 

For example, "The engine was rebuilt 10 years ago.  Here's the receipt."

"There was only minor rust around the wheel wells when I had it repainted in 1999."

"I hadn't driven it for 5 years until I put it up for sale."

"My father loved this car and took it to national meets regularly until he died last year."

 

You can often assess a seller's character and how much he cared for the car.

Someone who really appreciated his car likely spent more on it, and you may

find all the hidden things in better condition.

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Jack is very right. Not to sound immodest, but I often know more about most of the cars in my inventory than the owners. Not just the marque and model, but that particular car. If it was restored hands-on by the owner, then sure, they've probably got a lot of knowledge. But a vast majority of cars out there were bought "as-is" or were part of a "checkbook restoration" and the owners typically only know a few very superficial things--mostly how much money they have tied up in the car. We're kind of unique around here in that we are detail-oriented and history matters to us, but my experience says that most guys in the old car hobby just buy cars they like but don't necessarily care to research the hell out of them. I've had guys bring cars to me and they didn't even know what year they were! I've had guys bring me relatively rare cars and not know what engine was inside (a Mustang the owner thought had a 429 actually had a 427 side-oiler, for instance).

 

Yes, it's nice to talk to an owner, but with perhaps 60-70% of the cars out there, the owner will tell you he doesn't know or, in my case, they'll say, "You should ask Matt about that, he knows more than I do."

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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One type of situation, different from what Matt describes above,

is when a car goes from dealer to dealer, to auction, to auction, to dealer.

It then almost becomes a commodity, and I suspect much of the

first-hand knowledge becomes lost.

 

I went to see a beautiful low-mileage 1948 Buick Super sedan which the owner

had restored, doing a good portion of the work himself.  He had a

video tape depicting the work done.  I didn't buy it (alas), and a dealer

acquired it.  I saw it a few months later for sale by a DIFFERENT dealer,

who had acquired it at an auction.  Then that dealer took it to auction

at least once.  Later that year a third dealer was trying to sell it.

I hope it eventually found a good home.

 

In a case like that, did that third dealer know everything the original seller did?

I don't suppose so.  I hope at least the video tape got passed along, so the

final buyer knows the history of the car he bought.

1948 Buick Super for sale (3).JPG

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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