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Beltfed

Need very tacky grease

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I am reassembling a transmission with two sets of uncaged needle bearings.  In search of a very tacky grease to hold them in place until I get the gear shaft slid in.  Anyone have an old 'goto' for this sort of job?  Thanks

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Try John Deere Corn Head Grease.  I use it in steering gear boxes, it dose not melt and leak away,  It should what you want it to.

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Wheel bearing grease will work well for this also.

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I remember rebuilding Ford top-loader 4-speed transmissions, and GM transmissions, in the 1960's and 1970's.

 

The counter shafts used uncaged needle bearings.  the countershaft gears used usually 2 sets of them. The trick is not the grease as much as patience and taking your time.  Once all the needle bearings, on each set were installed, they actually stayed in place; after the last bearing was put in.  

 

Usually that last needle had to be put in, by starting one end and then pushing it into the counter shaft. Not following me, OK, we just used the wheel bearing grease, non-fibrous, but sticky.  Put a small amount in the counter shaft where the bearings go, with your finger, and start laying the needles, better if you go 1 by 1, in the counter shaft on the layer of grease.  If the bearing were good and the gear was also good, there would be a snug fit for the last needle.  Thus maybe starting it by sliding the last needle into the open space from the end of the needle, ( it may or should be too tight to try to push it down into the gap).  The will not fall out now, if all parts are not worn out.

 

If this last needle was not snug, then maybe you lost 1 needle, or the gear bore was worn as well as the needles. Most likely a needle was missing.   Count them and check the parts book for the correct number. If they don't fit this way, and are still loose; the needles will not run true.  Stop right there, something is wrong.  When I say "snug", this is an acquired feel, but check the clearance with a feeler gauge, then check your manual for the spec.

 

If the needles fall out, something is worn-out. Because then you set the counter-shaft into the transmission case, with the counter-shaft gear spacers and thrust washers. Keeping in mind on those 4-speeds the counter shaft would be inserted, after the input and mainshaft were installed in the transmission. Sounds complicated, well you just have to watch very closely, that all parts are where they belong.  The grease only held the needles during assembly, until the last needle was inserted. Again, if too loose here, you better find the problem or the transmission will not last long.

 

The input shaft also had "loose needles" between it and the mainshaft. I'm not talking about the input shaft bearing.  I don't have a diagram but you can google an exploded view of the transmission parts.

 

intimeold

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Pretty much any grease will work. Use your finger to work the grease into the "needles". Done it dozens of times.........................Bob

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Thanks guys.  I'll try to find that corn head grease in the morning as my helper, or I should say I'm his helper, has grandkids baseball games.

Intimeold, very good stuff to know.  We will look carefully at the area around the bearings.  It's funny or sad how a simple job of replacing the tail shaft bearing now has us redoing the tranny.  

 

Edited by Beltfed (see edit history)

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I got some general purpose grease at Tractor supply that I thought was much stickier than the usual grease I had been getting from NAPA. 

 

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There is a needle bearing grease available, I used to buy it from OMC but I would think a Google search would find you some.

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John Deere TY24425 water resistant grease. Tackiest out of all our grease. What we use around the shop to hold needle rollers in place.

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Vaseline Petroleum Jelly breaks down 100%.  I've used it on c4s, t10s, muncies, etc. many times.

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As always, Thanks Guys.  It's nice to have goto people that have actually been there.

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Corn head grease rating spec is usually EP 0 or 00 (NGLI 0 or 00)

Regular lube/chassis type grease is thicker @ EP 2 or NGLI 2 rating.

Lube type grease EP 2 is much thicker.... I'd use that.. 

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18 hours ago, 61-63 said:

Vaseline Petroleum Jelly breaks down 100%.  I've used it on c4s, t10s, muncies, etc. many times.

 

I've used this before, too, and it worked perfectly.

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petroleum jelly --100% breakdown --- some grease has things added to it that should not be in the gear lube ---- my father  ran Transmission shop for over 35 years --I still build and the new assembly lube we use is petroleum jelly with a red tint.--when I did my training for ford they also told use to use it.---In hot weather it can start to melt down but we just stick it in the fridge for a bit--cold and sticky. 

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Red and tacky Lucas grease is plenty tacky.

You really don't need extra sticky tacky grease to do the job... careful assembly procedure is the key as already mentioned. 

NGLI # 2 grease will be good enough.     #0 or 00  thin is a bit thin.

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