Kosage Chavis

1955 Buick Century

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11 minutes ago, Kosage Chavis said:

Thank you Mr Willie.  You have persuaded me not to bother with this.  So, how do I get the pistons out without damaging the piston and/or cylinder if there is a lip present?  Can I tap the piston out without worry of damage, in spite of the lip?

 

 

I had a small lip on mine.  I used a honing tool on a drill to take it down and then remove the piston. Just honed the edge/lip area only.   

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1 hour ago, avgwarhawk said:
1 hour ago, Kosage Chavis said:

Thank you Mr Willie.  You have persuaded me not to bother with this.  So, how do I get the pistons out without damaging the piston and/or cylinder if there is a lip present?  Can I tap the piston out without worry of damage, in spite of the lip?

 

 

I had a small lip on mine.  I used a honing tool on a drill to take it down and then remove the piston. Just honed the edge/lip area only.   

Sounds like a good plan if you want to re-use the pistons, otherwise don't worry about damage to pistons.

At this point I would take the block with pistons and crank to the machine shop for disassembly and inspection/measuring of bores and crank, maybe magnaflux the block.  Even if you are not going to rebuild at this time you know what parts to assemble when you do (over size pistons, bearings).

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That engine looks so nice that I'd be surprised if there was a significant ridge.  Can you catch your fingernail on the ridge?  If not, the pistons should come out without any drama.

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10 hours ago, EmTee said:

That engine looks so nice that I'd be surprised if there was a significant ridge.  Can you catch your fingernail on the ridge?  If not, the pistons should come out without any drama.

You were right.  I got the pistons out without much resistance!  I will post later.

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Another thing to consider is, after grinding away all of the casting flash, is to paint the inside of the lifter valley and any other surfaces where oil drains back (or any place that is a known place for sludge buildup) with Glyptal.  Glypal makes the surfaces slick to aid drain back, and it seals cast iron.

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Work continued with piston removal.20200207_111317.thumb.jpg.3ed0de4ea493e72d6d73c3ff4c787e43.jpgI thought that I would need to put a ridge reamer on the block in order to remove the pistons, but my good friends here urged me not to.  So, I proceeded without doing so.  I made sure that the side of the engine that I was working on, that the top of the pistons were pointing to the floor.  I then began removing both nuts to each connecting rod shown here.20200207_111327.thumb.jpg.45b05f48b2befb017199b6c340b85bc6.jpgThis next photo is just to note that for each set of connecting rods that are paired together, there is a little tab on the clamp.  I am pointing to it right here.20200207_121148.thumb.jpg.2ef6c3cc9c85a2072077922427ebb470.jpgThese small tabs should face each other in each pair when reinstalled.  Once nuts are removed, slide the clamps off if you can.  In my case, none of mine did.  So, I took a long and slender piece of wood and placed the bottom end on the back side of the piston.  I took a hammer and tapped the other end of the wood until the connecting rod separated from the clamp.   This didn't work well enough on a couple of stubborn connecting rods.  So, for those I took a small hammer and lightly tapped one connecting rod clamp bolt till it pushed through and that freed up the clamp.  Just be sure not to damage the threads.  Once the piston was free, I tapped on that wood again to push the piston out.  I used one hand to tap the wood while using the other hand to catch and guide the piston from its bore.  Getting the piston rings past the lip was not difficult at all.  I probably will not be reusing these pistons on my this rebuild, but just in case, I made sure to label which piston each were and the direction it faced.  Showing the site of removal.20200207_142835.thumb.jpg.72741ad83e6c21645411b3dff41372e4.jpgShowing pistons removed from the engine.20200207_140937.thumb.jpg.7e9b3722e7d04b1e869ff7df80235eba.jpg20200207_142535.thumb.jpg.d3934c888537ae6ca3db8569b1bf5bc5.jpg20200209_180128.thumb.jpg.b48d07cee156fa0433ee125e1458fe8b.jpgOverall, this was a moderate task.

 

I will be sure to show the condition of the rod bearings later.

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I don't see any scuff marks on the pistons.   If the piston are original OEM I would reuse them as I hear a lot of different things about new pistons available on the market.   Let others chime in on that.  

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If the cylinders are round and spec out okay, re-ring and reuse the original pistons after running a hone up and down the bores.  On one nailhead that I had rebuilt, the machine shop reconditioned the rods. Rods can bend and twist. Might be worth checking.

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Next, I removed the flexplate as shown.20200207_142751.thumb.jpg.5555637676db9ce8b55b6ddce92ec099.jpgJust remove all 6 bolts as shown.20200207_142758.thumb.jpg.1865a8996a52a0fa6cf9d89a980f2014.jpg20200207_143806.thumb.jpg.2f1230bc717e4639baeda428f17aaad1.jpgNote that there is a dowell that makes sure the flexplate in installed in the correct manner.  When bolts are removed, slide the flexplate off of the crankshaft end.  Now, showing the site of removal.20200207_143915.thumb.jpg.f003977c73237155855ba710802a2f3d.jpgShowing the flexplate removed from the engine.20200207_143939.thumb.jpg.8d6fd824e92af3df0e0324c0e5c6f4ee.jpgOverall, this was an easy task.

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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Coming along quite nicely! At least you didn’t have to encounter the explosive problem that I had to deal with in my first Nailhead dismantling; #8 piston had completely disintegrated into MANY unrecognizable aluminum shrapnel fragments, throughout the crankcase and even broke off some sizable chunks of both sides of the lowest end of that cylinder wall! Still not sure if my original block is salvageable via a sleeving job or not. Only time and money will eventually determine this fate. Worst case scenario, I’ll be having the 2nd Nailhead that I have, rebuilt instead, someday....

55086117-6CF7-4DE7-B6FF-ED6B27D03013.png

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A friend of mine in Illinois has what is believed to be the first 63 Riviera with  the 425 engine.  Until he discovered that fact, he was going to do an engine swap.  He had put a rod through a cylinder wall.  That 425 has driven him all over the place with a wet sleeve in place.  Go for it!

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Next was the removal of the crankshaft as shown.20200207_144130.thumb.jpg.1acef8c658c827efca2c61d3be6413ad.jpgFirst, I only removed three main bearing caps (#2, #3 and #4) as shown by removing the 2 bolts at each of them as shown.20200207_144153.thumb.jpg.c95bb860eb3e95a5bf39aaee8555183c.jpgEach cap is numbered consecutively  (#1 being at the front of engine) and has an arrow that points to the front of the engine. 

 

I am not going to give advice on how to remove the caps because I struggled with this without the cap popping off uncontrollably.  Maybe one of you could school me here...  @EmTee, @avgwarhawk, @old-tank, @MrEarl, @NC-car-guy, @RivNut

 

I left the #1 cap and most rear cap (not numbered) in place, only unscrewing those bolts about half way.  I did this because the rear cap was too big and difficult to remove like the other smaller caps.  I then turned the engine over so that the weight of the crank rested totally on the 2 remaining caps.  The idea was to use the weight of the crank to push the much bigger rear cap off of the engine (without letting the crank fall).  I then took a rubber mallet and tapped down on the rear end of the crank, dislodging the rear cap in the process.  I then flipped the engine back over and I was able to pull off the rear cap without much of a problem.  The #1 cap was also removed.  After all caps are removed, grab both ends of the crank and carefully lift it up and out of the engine block.  Be sure to also remove the other halves of the main bearings.  Showing the site of removal.20200207_152659.thumb.jpg.37e4123f96e23552da744988e658adaa.jpgShowing the crankshaft removed from engine.20200207_152714.thumb.jpg.8c1310d7878a2a58673a590856874f06.jpgOverall, moderate task (only because removing the main bearing caps was a bit of a challenge).

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, Kosage Chavis said:

I left the #1 cap and most rear cap (not numbered) in place, only unscrewing those bolts about half way.  I did this because the rear cap was too big and difficult to remove like the other smaller caps.  I then turned the engine over so that the weight of the crank rested totally on the 2 remaining caps.  The idea was to use the weight of the crank to push the much bigger rear cap off of the engine (without letting the crank fall).  I then took a rubber mallet and tapped down on the rear end of the crank, dislodging the rear cap in the process.  I then flipped the engine back over and I was able to pull off the rear cap without much of a problem

Ingenious.  Now why didn't I think of that.

I use long bolts in the rear cap (for the pan bolts) to get it off.

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Showing the existing conditions of the rod bearings and its associated rod bearing journals.

 

#1 piston20200207_140403.thumb.jpg.c88aa62e922376f8e21b5bfc87534ece.jpg20200207_141733.thumb.jpg.33bbdb47169e4a5845ac9f9117d48ae6.jpg#2 piston20200207_125547.thumb.jpg.f9e52af2b237a402b8a4fb6e3d3d8ec3.jpg20200207_141115.thumb.jpg.bbe97a5080187b231756fa04d65650e0.jpg#3 piston20200207_140412.thumb.jpg.ccd7184b6e73df695dd3f7cb9c31ebc4.jpg985562279_20200207_1418322.thumb.jpg.c85995b1d0ef59a96b797a67d0a35787.jpg#4 piston 20200207_125714.thumb.jpg.1190a59e6542f2fa8e26603cc06235e9.jpg463979929_20200207_1412362.thumb.jpg.a408a5ce9a4ae036eddb6c3da2893a4d.jpg#5 piston20200207_140426.thumb.jpg.eda0638203f5aa340ea57eed1c543ea2.jpg57846696_20200207_1419202.thumb.jpg.952ba24ee1e495eff457cdca316634ab.jpg#6 piston20200207_125731.thumb.jpg.d9ec51eb65cda734aae0953b32074ec2.jpg20200207_141341.thumb.jpg.aff7ffc08cab92caf0ff54e46e04c90a.jpg#7 piston20200207_140438.thumb.jpg.454ddb57b9151c99d835782640fa76db.jpg666211350_20200207_1420232.thumb.jpg.464ecd70af936c7b7e10f3450872a4dd.jpg#8 piston20200207_125748.thumb.jpg.bb55a7f7cff13f1b9dffc4b62a9091d3.jpg20200207_141443.thumb.jpg.218b0d0993d2ed9bb3db73883237b0f2.jpgFrom what I can tell, I see nothing serious.  Most of it looks to be normal wear.  Maybe a more experienced set of eyes can provide their opinions.

 

 

Main bearings and associated main bearing journals are next.

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Kosage, Back to the picture above of your flex plate for a second: the starter ring gear teeth look as if BRAND NEW! I was just going through the latest info on your progress and couldn’t help but noticing that. There’s a high possibility that after whatever major head work was performed on that Nailhead some several moons ago, little to no major time or miles were put on it before it was parked for a few decades! I really can’t even tell which side of that gear, the starters bendix gear engaged (of course it would engage the side facing the engine, just sayin’). New set of seals, bearings, rings, detailed cleaning prep work on the parts and.... she’ll be a dang fine Nailhead for MANY YEARS!

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4 hours ago, Sean Batiz said:

There’s a high possibility that after whatever major head work was performed on that Nailhead some several moons ago, little to no major time or miles were put on it before it was parked for a few decades! 

If memory serves me correct the previous owner, owned this car for about 11 years.  He purchased the car in 2001...I think.  Then, it was sold to me in Nov of 2012.  Between 2001 and 2012, the heads were rebuilt.  And the previous owner barely drove the car.  He told me that he lost interest in it.  So, the car sat around for about a decade (for the most part).  I am thinking about removing the engine from the parts car to see which one is in better shape.  Maybe there is less wear.  We will have to see.

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)

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Showing the condition of the main cap bearings.

 

Main cap bearing #120200207_152143.thumb.jpg.e29b8e2aa719620e8ee04914ad60fb6a.jpg

Main cap bearing #220200207_152215.thumb.jpg.4f6863f0efda286c3ca68091f234f374.jpg

Main cap bearing #320200207_152235.thumb.jpg.444a23dbb5ae1df43d33654f1e39ce34.jpg

Main cap bearing #420200207_152258.thumb.jpg.8733f9d66821d17c656839b5dabda83a.jpg

Rear main cap bearing 20200207_152413.thumb.jpg.7ec467aebfe2d399dceb18510b788ff1.jpg

 

 

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