Kosage Chavis

1955 Buick Century

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14 hours ago, Sean Batiz said:

but, why I was suspecting these critters went in via the road-draft tube as well, had to do with my car having been one of the many older models of cars in the mid 70’s that went through California’s smog check program which called for it’s road-draft tube to be  literally chopped off about an inch out of its port for a rubber elbow to be attached (rotted away and hole exposed) that was routed to the top of the oil bath air silencer/cleaner housing that also received a roughly chopped hole in it for this rubber hose/elbow arrangement  to fit (this tube extended through the housings top and was fixed to another hole cut into the filter element itself to the clean side of the element; a fruitless attempt at creating a closed crankcase breather system).

Got any pictures of this setup?  I am curious about it.

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On a side note to do with the valley pan itself and, the bulky air silencer for these Nailhead’s, you’ll want to be sure to drill out the baffle plate spot-welds of pan to THOROUGHLY get it cleaned up and be able to replace the steel-wool like filter gauze that’s undoubtedly in bad shape after 64 years. As for the air silencer, there’s a tedious method of bending away at the rolled bead of either end of its housing, to accomplish getting into its inner cavity for again, THOROUGH cleaning! You won’t want to have your freshly rebuilt engine, suck up a cloud of rust! It’d be inevitable for the oil bath filter to NOT catch it all.

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I just noticed your message! No, I don’t remember ever taking any pictures of how  that smog check arrangement was. I removed whatever was still left of it, that hadn’t rotted away and, had the tube welded back together and holes closed back off.

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I posed this question on the "post war" forum,  but I assume no one saw it.  I wanted to know if there were any extra steps to separating the transmission from engine besides what is already spelled out in the shop manual?  I appreciate any answers.

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Remove dust cover... Remove 3 nuts that hold the torque coverter to the flywheel (the sit just a little proud from the rest of the torque converter nuts), loosen kickdown linkage and dipstick, remove bellhousing bolts...

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4 hours ago, NC-car-guy said:

Remove dust cover... Remove 3 nuts that hold the torque coverter to the flywheel (the sit just a little proud from the rest of the torque converter nuts), loosen kickdown linkage and dipstick, remove bellhousing bolts...

So, no marking off anything to make sure it is bolted in the same manner in terms of the torque converter to flywheel bolting?

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38 minutes ago, Kosage Chavis said:

So, no marking off anything to make sure it is bolted in the same manner in terms of the torque converter to flywheel bolting?

There is only one correct way if you line up the reliefs for the converter drain plugs.

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Be sure to read @KAD36's stories from the original rebuild as well as the 'Take-2' follow-up below.  My takeaway is that even if proper procedures and techniques are followed, parts availability can be challenging and selecting the wrong parts, or even reusing what appear to be serviceable used parts can have significant consequences regarding the ultimate success of the rebuild. 

 

Been away for a bit.....

 

My situation, with the rod nut shearing at each facet after 5000+miles, was a corner point failure.  These aren't racing engines turning high rpms.  It was an expensive lesson and experience and while the probability of occurrence is remote (as evidenced by no known similar field failures), about 100 bucks preventative investment in parts and custom machining per provided sketches avoids 25x realized cost in parts and labor.  Pretty good cost to risk ratio.

 

To give credit where it is due, the reason that engine ran like a Swiss watch was because so many people's experienced voices were baked into it and all helped think it through first to understand the "tolerance stack" issues before just throwing parts at it. 

 

"Test run" each subassembly in its installed configuration to the greatest extent possible. 

Edited by KAD36 (see edit history)
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36 minutes ago, KAD36 said:

To give credit where it is due, the reason that engine ran like a Swiss watch was because so many people's experienced voices were baked into it and all helped think it through first to understand the "tolerance stack" issues before just throwing parts at it. 

 

"Test run" each subassembly in its installed configuration to the greatest extent possible. 

I really appreciate the guidance and will definitely take heed to your advice.  My parents didn't raise a fool and I understand that it will take the town to make this a success.  I have read over your "take 2" and will probably be reading 10 more times.

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Did a couple things today.  First, I saw that missed this removal shown here...the driver's side engine to mount bracket.20191221_193043.thumb.jpg.815483a2c29825c760574e88967aeaac.jpgRemove 3 bolts shown here. Remove.20191221_193052.thumb.jpg.68899b1ef0abfc8103bebf776364f6cf.jpgShowing removal site.20191221_193836.thumb.jpg.f785284a851ecdbd78294d72d6a39bfe.jpgShowing driver's side engine to mount bracket removed from engine.20191221_193843.thumb.jpg.2c0c03a4e299ef5add3ddf704cff438d.jpgOverall, easy task.

 

Now that I am done will the dynaflow carriage, I can set the dynaflow on it while the engine sets on a 4 x 4 and a pair of jackstands.  20191221_203955.thumb.jpg.83eb6694d267753c6602d1927fc3877d.jpg20191221_204138.thumb.jpg.1721d1fa5c23bb429824b5b7a25b82c8.jpg20191221_204104.thumb.jpg.c49fbe5817dafbcf18218de75661bae2.jpgThe idea is to separate by just rolling the dynaflow away after all unbolting steps are performed.  Of course, I will add 1 more jackstand to the rear engine when separating to support the rear.  The dynaflow will remain on the newly made carriage and the engine will be mounted to a rolling engine stand.

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1 hour ago, Kosage Chavis said:

I will add 1 more jackstand to the rear engine when separating to support the rear.

Use an engine hoist.

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You built a fine strong roller for the dynaflow there.

 

When you unbolt the three bolts on the flex plate take a marker and mark the location of the flex plate where it came apart so as to bolt it back in the same location.

IMG_3239_Easy-Resize_com.thumb.jpg.90ba5ca09414e8f132cef42bfff94a3a.jpg

 

Then take out the housing to engine bolts after putting something under each side of the oil pan edge to keep the block steady when the last two bolts come out or like old-tank said, use an engine hoist to keep it level.

 

 

 

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I hope everyone had a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.  Out of the whole break,  I only had a few hours to work on the engine.  I spent that time separating the engine and transmission.  First thing I did was to follow Mr Willie's advise and support the engine with an engine hoist rather than using jack stands.20200105_161500.thumb.jpg.1d16d60d42bd593633633088e3d61cf7.jpgOnce secured, I removed the bell housing cover as shown.20200105_163410.thumb.jpg.b3330d569f2c01222ef05ffe9ff8c272.jpgRemove 6 bolts (2 bolts into engine block and 4 bolts into bell housing).  Remove.  Showing site after removal.20200105_164559.thumb.jpg.b12f16573ba539f1c729c48d53618f4f.jpgShowing the bell housing cover removed from the engine.20200105_164613.thumb.jpg.5e0ae19c8e98ca1f3427af54a32e9459.jpg

Next, I rotated the flywheel with a flathead screwdriver rested against 1 bell housing cover bolt reinstalled as shown to reach the other nuts.20200105_172627.thumb.jpg.ecd6c2ba454004e863a52d96420b4615.jpgI did this to preserve any mounting surfaces.  There are over 20 nuts mounted at the outer diameter.  When you look closely, you can differentiate the 3 flywheel to torque converter nuts from the rest because these 3 nuts are resting directly on the flywheel, while all of the others are actually poking through a hole in the flywheel as shown.  Remove.20200105_172745.thumb.jpg.7ac2226c291d6325f7fac395bb950387.jpgNext, remove 6 bell housing to engine block bolts as shown. 20200105_173825.thumb.jpg.50b435a446c75e0411b546e76425d6a6.jpgI then hoisted the engine end up just a bit to get enough separation from engine and transmission to fit a wedge between them.  There are 2 dowels that keep the engine and transmission aligned with each other.  1 is right on the side where the starter motor mounts to as shown.20200105_174757.thumb.jpg.992b928b07e9014bfde4207b13a6e4f1.jpgThe other dowel is opposite to the 1st one as shown.20200105_174644.thumb.jpg.3ca3f49cc5c35dfbccebdd9f4f1de595.jpgI took a wedge and very carefully pried the engine off of the transmission at the dowel locations.  When both dowels slide off, you now have complete separation.20200105_174951.thumb.jpg.95864e6269afbb77a77a1f8689dfca44.jpgI also was sure to note how the flywheel was bolted to the torque converter.  These 3 holes in the flywheel shown here...20200105_175329.thumb.jpg.9e1d53e4ce4c7c883e5adfb51f3f267d.jpgline up with the 4 features  (2 bolts, a plug and a welded tab) shown here on the torque converter.20200105_175418.thumb.jpg.15c2151418dcf70e7343d0ceec29d4a0.jpgShowing the transmission on its homemade carriage.20200105_200918.thumb.jpg.46341cbb32df687ea470a6e00a3b3529.jpgAnd showing the engine on its engine stand.20200105_200934.thumb.jpg.8f74d2b65609297c5d8123e27ac2b878.jpgOverall, this task was easy.

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I’m jealous! If only I’d performed this same task inside of a relatively clean garage, rather than the outdoors of my back field, the various matting surfaces wouldn’t have accumulated the surface rust it all very much did! Only being sarcastic about jealousy; just sayin’ it’s a heck of a lot better having enough space inside of a garage/building for such tasks vs. outdoors. The general climate in So Cal is such that it makes forgetting to protect metal from the elements, a real problem! Nice and dry for 97% of the year.

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Posted (edited)

Got this in the mail today.  One power antenna that is fully intact (minus the tubular housing) and a parts power antenna that is fully intact (minus the mast).  Compliments of Mr Glenn.  20200107_182121.thumb.jpg.46577719a2e6dd5c347f1c0d63c23f62.jpg 20200107_181954.thumb.jpg.53069417dd386164777cfd21911635e5.jpgHad no clue the power antennas for these cars were so long.  I am unsure if the nylon cord is still intact.  Does anyone know how to retract the mast if the motor isn't functional?  Thank you.

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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4 hours ago, Kosage Chavis said:

Got this in the mail today.  One power antenna that is fully intact (minus the tubular housing) and a parts power antenna that is fully intact (minus the mast).  Compliments of Mr Glenn.  20200107_182121.thumb.jpg.46577719a2e6dd5c347f1c0d63c23f62.jpg 20200107_181954.thumb.jpg.53069417dd386164777cfd21911635e5.jpgHad no clue the power antennas for these cars were so long.  I am unsure if the nylon cord is still intact.  Does anyone know how to retract the mast if the motor isn't functional?  Thank you.

Is that your second pair or the ones you bought some months ago?  To retract if motor is stuck, you're better off taking it apart so you don't damage the nylon cable.

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15 hours ago, lancemb said:

Is that your second pair or the ones you bought some months ago?  To retract if motor is stuck, you're better off taking it apart so you don't damage the nylon cable.

This is the second pair.  The first set I bought, even though it looked like everything was there to make a complete assembly, was still all in pieces.  I saw an intact assembly in good shape and had to jump on it.

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Yep 👍🏻! You definitely should carefully take it apart to prevent any damage to its nylon cord, given its not already in several segments. Remove the aluminum curled tube from the casing first and slide it from the nylon cord and set it aside. Separate the upper casing that the mast’s connected to. Slide that away from the motors’ middle section casing and the double pinch roller setup will be exposed. You’ll notice that the left one, if looking at the end where both rollers are facing you, has an adjustable swing pivot fastener with a nylon locking nut with flat washer. Loosen this up. It’ll release the tension of the nylon cord and allow you to slide the cord from the casing/motor body. Hopefully, its cord is in one continuous piece! If not, you may have to take the approach that I took of carefully expanding the swivel crimp connector that’s fixed to the end of the smallest, solid rod of the mast &, replacing the cord. I used a stretch of Craftsman weed-wacker nylon cord that had a cross-section diamond shape; it spirals along its length, which causes a bit of a rotation of the cord as it goes up and down but, doesn’t seem to bother the functionality of it. I had to carefully widdle down the tip from having a diamond shape to a round stem that was small enough to insert into the swivel crimp connector on the solid rod. Applied some J-B Quick epoxy to this tip, without attempting to recrimp it (it’s aluminum and VERY FRAGILE!). If you’re able to pinch the solid rod (two small blocks of wood and bench vise), you can remove the mast’s tip (threaded on). This will allow you to separate the solid rod for ease of getting a new cord attached, if necessary. I took mine completely apart (requires de soldering the field winding leads from the brush holder terminals) to get access to the lower bearing/bushing for servicing this (mine was seized up down there!). Works beautifully now, even when bench tested with the original switch inline! Now, just gotta RESTORE THE REST OF THE BUICK! 🙄. This oughta make a perfect winter bench project for you! Enjoy....

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I worked with one 55 Olds PA with a decent mast; slightly bent along each segment that needed rolled out, carefully. Had its cord broken in several points. And one 55 Buick Roady PA with its cord and mast severed off just above where it would’ve protruded above the mount of fender. The Olds PA uses a much larger curled, oval shaped aluminum holding tube; whereas the Buick PA uses the compact, circular aluminum tube.

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Posted (edited)

@Sean Batiz, I appreciate the step by step process for breaking down the antenna.  I can't store the main antenna until I retract the mast and I CANNOT have this mast (that's in very good shape) getting damaged.  So, at some point really soon, I will need to take care of that.  Of course, I will post plenty of pictures and experience when I do.

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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Kosage, I forgot to mention that (from what I experienced) before you detach the upper casing section of antenna body, you should first loosen up the pinch roller spring tension screw that’s on the side of that upper casing. If you’re one of those lucky fellas that actually has one of these with its original nylon cord intact, you’ll want to notate the current position of that tensions set screw and count off the CCW turns required for its removal, so it can later be reset at roughly the same tension. Upon reassembling the unit, the nylon locking nut that secures the pivoting roller oughta be tightened down until seated and backed off just enough to allow that rollers’ axle casting to swivel in & out. It’s level of bite to the masts’ nylon cord, will then be determined by the externally adjustable spring tensioning screw. Just tight enough to eliminate slipping, is where I left mine at. Slippage: motors’ bench tested in either direction and runs fine but, no, minimal or, intermittent  movement of mast. After initially marking the position of  the tension screw, and loosen it off by say 2 or 3 revs CCW, you should be able to at that point, gently work the telescoping antenna segments back down (the nylon cord will be free to slide into the aluminum tube, if still pliable) if you’d rather, to at least have it in a safer storable length for now.

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@Sean Batiz, very good advice and thank you.  I plan on fooling with the power antennas soon...after I take care of the engine.

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