Kosage Chavis

1955 Buick Century

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3 hours ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

Well, don't keep it a secret!

 

Job security!  :lol:

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

3 hours ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

 

 Well, don't keep it a secret!

 

  Ben

All requests will be honored if written on the back of a $3 bill.  Actually I just wait until ready for the info like cylinder heads (valve stem to guide clearance, improper shims, valve stem height set wrong)

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I realize that your plenty far away from needing this little piece of advice but, when the time comes to mount the exhaust manifolds, DO NOT USE ANY GASKETS‼️ These Nailhead’s don’t like’em! If memory serves me correctly, they don’t allow heat to correctly dissipate and can cause exhaust valve failure.

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5 hours ago, Sean Batiz said:

they don’t allow heat to correctly dissipate and can cause exhaust valve failure.

Never heard of that.  The only problem I have seen is that the exhaust manifold gets too hot at the flange and gets crumbly.

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Yep, no gaskets from the factory.  The exhaust manifolds act as a heat sink pulling heat from the head and letting it flow out through the exhaust pipes.  Much less work for the coolant and the radiator.

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Over the weekend, I finished removing the rest of the external parts from the engine.  First, I removed the oil filter assembly as shown.20191122_161557.thumb.jpg.9336ee6112bb42b104bda043a4e65277.jpgRemove canister retaining bolt shown here.20191122_161605.thumb.jpg.6d1c778ee909c131c4be43a0e25abea4.jpgCatch any oil with an oil pan.  Remove.  Then, remove the 4 bolts shown here.20191122_162312.thumb.jpg.857def59b686afd22a60203f8266c716.jpgAgain, be ready for oil to spill when flange is separated.  Remove.  Showing the site of removal.20191122_162815.thumb.jpg.fd3cc19e2db1b826657e098386c3068a.jpgShowing the oil filter assembly removed from engine.20191122_162834.thumb.jpg.93632d3d81bc4d697e309e4ebd577287.jpg

 

Next,  I removed the engine dipstick as shown.20191122_163110.thumb.jpg.3b620ce59922ea0d16d127a29057472e.jpgNo explanation needed here.  Showing removal site.20191122_163133.thumb.jpg.1248ec00fa6526068c014004423b39ce.jpgShowing engine dipstick removed from the engine.20191122_163142.thumb.jpg.a0c96837ba83ead42c98ec9208f1a1ba.jpg

 

Next, I removed the distributor assembly as shown.20191122_163356.thumb.jpg.115d04383cd5d375327b5fc3b9dff4e8.jpgSimply remove this bolt with the hold down arm as shown.20191122_163403.thumb.jpg.94f896c32253bd56f26603da72cd18aa.jpgWiggle/turn the head of the distributor until you are able to slide from bore.  Remove.  Showing site of removal.20191122_163705.thumb.jpg.73325d3b36801e8e3d8f8a2c6eda54d1.jpgShowing the distributor assembly removed from engine.20191122_163714.thumb.jpg.4be0a12958b38a2177c32432737c6241.jpg

 

Finally,  I removed the starter motor as shown.20191122_165431.thumb.jpg.1e0f39383f5c51d5d698c82e1ed317cf.jpgThe starter is held in place with 2 bolts.  1 at the top and 1 at the bottom that is more tucked away.20191122_165452.thumb.jpg.166eda94b44d621473cee12002a8c916.jpgRemove the bottom bolt first.  Then loosen the top bolt just a bit.  Support the other end of the starter with your hand and then remove top bolt completely.  Slide the starter out and remove.  Showing site of removal.20191122_170653.thumb.jpg.a76149a011c29ddce05cfcd2be5eca3f.jpgShowing the starter motor removed from the engine.20191122_170718.thumb.jpg.52422e5f4783191793d0102c5bcacd66.jpg

 

Overall, all tasks in this post were easy.

 

Now that all if the external items are removed from the engine, it's time to seperate the transmission from the engine and finally get the engine on an engine stand...hopefully this weekend.

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1 hour ago, avgwarhawk said:

Order up freeze plugs.   I see one by the oil filter housing that is need of replacing.  :) 

Indeed.  I spotted this not long after I bought the car in 2012.  

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Interesting to note the oil filter canister has the pained orange AC Delco etc still visible.  How may miles are on this block?   

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1 hour ago, avgwarhawk said:

Interesting to note the oil filter canister has the pained orange AC Delco etc still visible.  How may miles are on this block?   

When I bought the car, the odometer read 51,365.  The title listed the odometer as "Actual".  I have only put 6 miles on it since I've had it.  My money is on 151,371 total rather than 51,371.  The condition of the engine is indicative of this, but I know I could be wrong.

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Just now, Kosage Chavis said:

When I bought the car, the odometer read 51,365.  The title listed the odometer as "Actual".  I have only put 6 miles on it since I've had it.  My money is on 151,371 total rather than 51,371.  The condition of the engine is indicative of this, but I know I could be wrong.

Just maybe actual.

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16 minutes ago, Kosage Chavis said:

School me.

I think the ridge at the top of the cylinders will be the tell tale sigh.  You know the heads were done at one point. These look quite good. As such and only the heads rebuilt the lower end would have low miles and left untouched IMO.  Add in the AC lettering on the canister looking very good leads me to believe these are actual miles.

 

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57 minutes ago, avgwarhawk said:

BTW the picture of the dipstick still in the block, the cylinder to the left of it...looks like crosshatch marks are evident?

Oh, that's just lithium grease that I sprayed the cylinder walls down with to prevent rusting.  Maybe I can wipe it down and take a closer photo.  From what I could tell, there were no honing marks.  There is a decent lip at the top of some of the bores also, if that gives you any clue.

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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Popped open the valley cover on the parts car to see some of the engines condition.  Not bad for a car where the body is rotting away.20191127_162002.thumb.jpg.5a3e4daba55597b1a08bbf07f1616832.jpg20191127_162018.thumb.jpg.c33f2c33161b9498dcf506a5c2166710.jpg20191127_162028.thumb.jpg.26ec04c27e70b0c41559076c88ff1702.jpg20191127_162055.thumb.jpg.33bb3349041cddc52757ccae16e5fe08.jpg20191127_162106.thumb.jpg.16f55301186572350da1411e193e33a2.jpgI was thinking about trying to get it to run, but with all the dried up sludge, I might have to pass.

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Had I chosen to break down the engine in my first Nailhead to have thoroughly removed all of its “dried up sludge”, BEFORE attempting to continue running it (regardless of having fresh oil), it most likely would still be a runner to this day, instead of having its #8 piston completely disintegrate into a pile of aluminum  shrapnel at the bottom of the oil pan!

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My Dad got me a welding machine for my birthday.  I have always wanted to learn how to weld.  My Dad has been welding for decades and is a master welder himself.  If I can be half the welder my Dad is, then I will be able to do the metal repairs on the Buick.  Can't wait to start learning!20191129_132450.thumb.jpg.a7fa0eb17cfd19c3d3f80827d57b1a8b.jpg

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No offense to you or your dad but, unless he “still” has great/decent eyesight, seek your welding knowledge from multiple sources! Anyone whom has performed good welding procedures for many years and still possess decent eyesight, generally can be trusted to know what they’re talking about; those whom are lazy about these skill sets, mainly with regard to personal safety, will usually have pretty bad eyesight before even 45 years of age. PROTECT YOUR EYES AT ALL COSTS ‼️ Just my 2¢ on the subject of welding, based on my own experiences with what welding skills I’ve personally learned over the years. In other words, spending what might seem like too much on the necessary helmet/goggle lens arrangement, will be less than having permanent or long term sight loss. This all said, GOOD LUCK & ENJOY! Welding can be sort of therapeutic or meditative.

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1 hour ago, Sean Batiz said:

No offense to you or your dad but, unless he “still” has great/decent eyesight, seek your welding knowledge from multiple sources!

Not worried about that with my Dad.  He knows the different weld processes, know how to weld different metals of various thicknesses.  Oh, and he has decent eye sight.  My Dad is also a perfectionist and craftsman.  If there is something in doubt, he would tell me.

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On 11/27/2019 at 11:58 PM, Sean Batiz said:

Had I chosen to break down the engine in my first Nailhead to have thoroughly removed all of its “dried up sludge”, BEFORE attempting to continue running it (regardless of having fresh oil), it most likely would still be a runner to this day, instead of having its #8 piston completely disintegrate into a pile of aluminum  shrapnel at the bottom of the oil pan!

Sean, how much did you run that engine before it became ruined?

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Three years of intermittent driving. It wasn’t a daily driver by any stretch of the imagination but, I did really enjoy driving it around from time to time. Purred, drove, ran, flawlessly & superbly quiet! What really made matters worse for its ability for proper oil flow, was when I was running it in below freezing temperatures (actually had a pretty harsh winter here in So Cal back in 2005); the sludge and grime severely reduced the ability for the oil to enter the oil pumps’ pickup tube screen. If I were to guess, I’d say that I was only able to enjoy about 1,500 total miles out of it over the 3 years of owning it, up to that point in time (I bought it in Nov. of ‘02). Not sure how to estimate the total hours of operation. I really didn’t think that it’s oil pan had as much buildup of caked in layers of rock hard sludge/grime, to the extent that it very much did indeed have. Once I broke everything down, I discovered that the oil pan had roughly a 3” to 5” thick SOLID layer of thick sludge and grime buildup that near completely encapsulated the oil pumps screen. I had to literally chisel the hardest layers out of its pan & honestly, couldn't believe that it had as good an oil pressure as it did. Lesson learned, the hard way! On a sad, creepy note, these “ La Brea Tar Pits” of ancient engine oil, was comprised of several  interlaced layers of small rodent skeleton cakes, apparently from various wild critters having climbed into the hole in the valley pan where the road draft tube mounts into; it wasn’t fastened into position for what looked like, MANY YEARS. When I first changed its oil, I went through 3 changes within the first 500 miles to flush it but, that method apparently doesn’t do squat for hardened grime. 

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9 hours ago, Sean Batiz said:

 interlaced layers of small rodent skeleton cakes, apparently from various wild critters having climbed into the hole in the valley pan where the road draft tube mounts into; it wasn’t fastened into position for what looked like, MANY YEARS.

No way to get in that location.  Someone left the distributor out or the oil fill off.  The pan on all old engines should be removed for cleaning before running!  Inferior oils from the past along with lead in the fuel formed that sludge.  And that lead laced sludge is highly toxic:  use gloves and put into old paint cans for proper disposal.

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Building a rolling carrier for the dynaflow transmission.  20191206_172454.thumb.jpg.653791063b326f8f9486b94903a3bd2f.jpg20191206_172509.thumb.jpg.75b3d973cfdc64956cb63a0638eedad4.jpgI still need to put some wheels on it and some small blocks on the sides to keep the transmission from moving side to side.

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After really digging through the dust in my memory, I “think” that the oil fill cap was in the trunk when I first got it; earlier 55 only had one cap for neck at the front of valley pan, none on valve covers. It’s distributor was definitely in place but, why I was suspecting these critters went in via the road-draft tube as well, had to do with my car having been one of the many older models of cars in the mid 70’s that went through California’s smog check program which called for it’s road-draft tube to be  literally chopped off about an inch out of its port for a rubber elbow to be attached (rotted away and hole exposed) that was routed to the top of the oil bath air silencer/cleaner housing that also received a roughly chopped hole in it for this rubber hose/elbow arrangement  to fit (this tube extended through the housings top and was fixed to another hole cut into the filter element itself to the clean side of the element; a fruitless attempt at creating a closed crankcase breather system). Either way, I just remember having fished out MANY tiny bones along with that ‘leaded’ sludge! Yes, you are correct in that one “should” clean out the oil pan in an older engine BEFORE running it; as I stated, Lesson Learned the Hard Way. I most definitely did place that nasty stuff in a proper pail for disposal; really stunk badly too! According to its paperwork at the time that I bought it in ‘01, it was last registered in 1976 so, it definitely sat for awhile. Kosage, your transmission stand is looking great & it oughta hold up quite well, for what you intend to be using it for!

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