Kosage Chavis

1955 Buick Century

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Posted (edited)
On 4/16/2019 at 8:10 PM, lancemb said:

Look at the top of the core through the tank opening.  See if they appear to have the same number and size of tubes.  If there is a significant capacity difference you can usually tell just by doing that. 

Three things: 1st) A “Thanks” to you,  Kosage, for the detailed picture of that angle iron bracket for the PS Pump! After recently having gone through the eminse inventory of Buick parts that I have, I couldn’t recall if the headbolt with protruding stud was used for that bracket or the generator/engine mounting  bracket on the right engine bank! 2nd) To the topic of the 1954 radiator having been used in ‘55 cars: I believe this to be 100% correct, seeing as the ‘55 Buick it belongs to was made in early 1955 (even has the early run of solid valve covers, no breather/oil filler caps. Just the single cap on neck of Valley Pan). It’s serial number being, 5B2009836 from GM “BOP” South Gate, Ca. Assembly Plant. 3rd) After going through some older receipts for stuff I had repaired for my first Buick, I came across the one from back in 2002 when I had my non-A/C radiator (3131177) rebuilt; indicates it was rebuilt with a “4 core” (I previously thought that I had that shop add an additional core to it); I’d still need to de-soldier either tank of the A/C radiator (3133727) to determine the number of cores it contains. These have a baffle in the upper tank, below the fill neck that restricts a clear visual image of the cores directly. Picture is of page from my 1955 Buick Master Chassis Parts Book. Lists radiator 3131177 for both 1954 and 1955 “1st jobs”.

347D41F7-998C-4505-BB0E-5C7B2AA90E35.jpeg

Edited by Sean Batiz
Misspelled name & more information inclusion. (see edit history)
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I didn't have much time to work on the car over the weekend, but I did manage to remove another part.  This time it was the windshield wiper arms.20190421_172645.thumb.jpg.73ed8d7266885900a181f50f375ef90d.jpgThe driver's side was easy.  I just grasped the base of the arm and wiggled it off of its spline.20190421_172806.thumb.jpg.13cc0ca42cb76c6a074d830dc1b4ad2b.jpgThe passenger's side needed a little more effort.  All you need is a block of wood and a flathead screwdriver.  Use in the manner shown in this photo and gently pry the base off.20190421_175822.thumb.jpg.183be24aa0d8f16a73b69e03a41d6f64.jpgJust be sure you are not prying up the splined head and that you are only catching the edge of the base of the arm.  Showing the windshield wiper arms removed from car.20190421_180057.thumb.jpg.d51489d959582b60b3423e815e834abe.jpgOverall, an easy task.

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20 hours ago, Sean Batiz said:

 

347D41F7-998C-4505-BB0E-5C7B2AA90E35.jpeg

Sean, I keep seeing the abbreviation "D.F." in the parts book.  Any idea what that stands for?

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1 hour ago, Kosage Chavis said:

I keep seeing the abbreviation "D.F." in the parts book.  Any idea what that stands for?

D.F. -dynflow

C.T -conventional transmission

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52 minutes ago, old-tank said:

D.F. -dynflow

C.T -conventional transmission

Thought that meant: “Driven Frequently”! Just kidding. Hey, Kosage, you may discover that by the time you finally get the body taken apart to the point where it’s ready to be removed from the Chassis, that you’ll be needing MORE STORAGE SPACE for the very many parts! At least, I sure did.

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3 hours ago, Sean Batiz said:

Thought that meant: “Driven Frequently”! Just kidding. Hey, Kosage, you may discover that by the time you finally get the body taken apart to the point where it’s ready to be removed from the Chassis, that you’ll be needing MORE STORAGE SPACE for the very many parts! At least, I sure did.

That would be correct Sean.  I am out of space, even with the make-over in my garage.  My wife and I have talked about building a detatched garage, but the money is not there.  I am starting to worry about the underside of the car and rust.

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5 hours ago, old-tank said:

D.F. -dynflow

C.T -conventional transmission

...and then the whole class said in unison..."THANK YOU MR WILLIE".

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Posted (edited)

I have officially run out of room for my parts.  What is shown here are parts that are just stacked in the middle of the floor.  20190608_191152.thumb.jpg.956885788c3b2a109252c92d740b4d59.jpgWhat is complicating matters more so is that I am very close to the point of needing to remove the engine and transmission.  I need to figure something out soon.  The process has stagnated.

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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Cars grow....a lot...when they are disassembled.

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1 hour ago, Kosage Chavis said:

What is shown here are parts that are just stacked in the middle of the floor.

 

Throw out the fishing poles.  That will give you more room...🙂

 

 

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4 hours ago, Smartin said:

Cars grow....a lot...when they are disassembled.

Yep, up to 4 garage stalls...or more.

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On 6/10/2019 at 7:01 PM, Smartin said:

Cars grow....a lot...when they are disassembled.

 

Yes sir. It take an entire factory floor to assemble parts and put them together!   

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On 6/10/2019 at 5:50 PM, Kosage Chavis said:

I have officially run out of room for my parts.  What is shown here are parts that are just stacked in the middle of the floor.  20190608_191152.thumb.jpg.956885788c3b2a109252c92d740b4d59.jpgWhat is complicating matters more so is that I am very close to the point of needing to remove the engine and transmission.  I need to figure something out soon.  The process has stagnated.

 

 

There is always the kitchen or living room  to store the drive train until you are ready for it.    Just be clever about it and the miss'us will not  notice.

 

ec3053aa6672a865fd9655201f100ec2.jpg 

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1 hour ago, avgwarhawk said:

There is always the kitchen or living room  to store the drive train until you are ready for it.  

 

But unlike the crafty solution in the picture posted, be sure to include the drip trays for the Buick parts, which seem to leak even if there is no fluid in them to leak! 🙄

 

 

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Any bare wall space must become shelves...

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Yeah, considering that I live in Southern California, I figure that when we finally do get hit by the “BIG ONE” (earthquake, that is), that I’ll definitely be impaled multiple times by the numerous Buick accessories and literature that’s overflowing from these wall covered shelves and cabinets in my bedroom! If only we could figure out a feasible method of temporarily shrinking these parts during storage! I have a 2 car garage that’s literally crammed full of parts and tools, giving ZERO space for an actual car, thus far so, I know how you feel! My poor Ol’ Buick’s have to remain stored in my back field, under tarps, for now.

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4 hours ago, Sean Batiz said:

 

 

21 hours ago, lancemb said:

 

 

On 6/14/2019 at 11:17 AM, JohnD1956 said:

 

 

On 6/14/2019 at 9:49 AM, avgwarhawk said:

 

 

On 6/10/2019 at 11:39 PM, old-tank said:

 

 

On 6/10/2019 at 7:01 PM, Smartin said:

 

Do not shed a tear for me my Buick Brethren!  Time to adapt...somehow.

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 I got this in the mail yesterday.  It was a box of power seat parts, including a set of adjuster legs. 20190617_204016.thumb.jpg.00c6e6f7c46f5ff765f7ef2b36fe0df4.jpgI was very happy with how much they were in good shape.  Power seat parts...compliments of Marcin in Poland!

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Old Buick parts from Poland?!?  Now I have heard everything!  :P

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Next, we’ll be reading that you’ve obtained a NOS/NIB 55 Buick Century headliner from the Antarctic! Our world 🌎 seems to be shrinking! There’s possibly plenty of old stock  R-12 refrigerant for your A/C system, available from Cambodia! Lol

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I've been sending '54 parts to a guy in Poland, who is doing amazing work for a Swedish client.

 

Do whatever it takes!

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Posted (edited)

Yesterday, I found a little time to remove something else off of the Buick.  I chose to remove the windshield wiper transmission assembly.  I had a problem removing the slotted screw head without damaging it.  So, I decided to fashion my own tool to easily remove it safely.  I had some spare galvanized steel pipe laying around.20190623_173338.thumb.jpg.52c738e6a6b88d6ab611860dabcb1398.jpgI cut about 2 inches of pipe and grinded both sides down till flat and parallel.  I then took the wire brush wheel and smoothed the surfaces to remove any sharp edges.  I placed the piece over top of the slotted screw and centered it.  I then took a sharpie and marked the exact locations of the slots while making my marks the same thickness of the slots.20190623_155216.thumb.jpg.3db30957ebb6ed3867cf007d5ece411b.jpgThe inside diameter of the pipe was slightly larger than the splined knob on the wiper assembly and fit perfectly on top of the slotted screw.  I took a dremel tool with a cutting wheel and a table grinder to grind down everything around the marks I made.  I had to try-and-tweek the socket a few times to get the perfect fit inside and on top of those slots.  Once this was achieved, I ran those those newly cut surfaces against the wire wheel to remove sharp edges.  I then grinded 2 flats on the other side of the tool.20190623_164608.thumb.jpg.a109fafee7a6642e95382faee0de1f09.jpg20190623_164546.thumb.jpg.346585e473576be7255dc7757c2d6050.jpgI was able to make the flats parallel and true enough to get an 18mm wrench over it snugly.  Once this was achieved, I again ran the wire brush wheel over the new surfaces.  I tried the new tool out and it worked perfectly.  No slippage or anything.20190623_164718.thumb.jpg.8eea64d2ff70c4795755a2b019db77b4.jpgNow, I have a tool for life.

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

...so as I was saying, I removed the windshield wiper transmission assembly.  First, I removed the slotted screw.20190623_164718.thumb.jpg.7031fd1e529072423394140f00d93d69.jpg20190623_173505.thumb.jpg.af31627e1c4ca2596c02b21773cd6ce0.jpgMove to the inside of the car and remove both nuts and washers that hold down the brace shown here.20190623_173521.thumb.jpg.cce6cd941336151020f4715db13815bc.jpgPull brace off the threads, pull down and angle out.20190623_173632.thumb.jpg.cfe86e7eedd1e496a64e802391e4e9d5.jpgThere are 2 separate cables that are linked to the center transmission.  I labeled both to note their position in respect to the 4 slots shown here.1559282631_20190623_1755292.jpg.43ed2480093e728ed42f7e18781512f6.jpgI then simultaneously gently tapped the front of one transmission while grasping and slightly wiggling the rear until it separates.20190623_173819.thumb.jpg.fe8bf71616892e3c881d5b66922f24e4.jpg20190623_173949.thumb.jpg.289d373fcaa032fbf4ef91975d31b574.jpgBe sure not to pull the capillary tubing.  Once you feel separation, pull the back end out completely and then carefully pull the front portion out.  You might have to angle out to get free from the screen.20190623_174113.thumb.jpg.0edb0c0646809aa8ef6d95acc1ab82c4.jpgYou can now unhook both cables from the center transmission.  Repeat these steps on the other side.  After pulling both sides, you are now left with the center transmission.  Simply unscrew both screws on both sides shown here. 20190623_175146.thumb.jpg.6a8eb5c521ae818fd61f4bba7db0671c.jpgOnce screws are removed, tap the center of the transmission from the inside of the car till the seal is broken.  You'll need to pull and angle the transmission out of its penetration from the outside.20190623_175529.thumb.jpg.97991c2ec7a770ee2d9e6988027ef322.jpgThe whole assembly is now removed.20190623_180052.thumb.jpg.bb2a957c43e29f6a06c508ff6841fa18.jpgShowing the whole assembly removed. Overall, it was a moderately easy task.

 

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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My space issue has been resolved...at least for now.  I had to do some spring cleaning and rearranging in the attic.  I then transferred car parts that I assumed would be safe in the attic, from the garage to the attic.  Not only is the garage floor clear, but I also cleared space on the shelving unit.  I can now resume removals.  So, I was looking over the Buick to see what would be next to remove and noticed my windshield had a tint at the top.20190726_163954.thumb.jpg.c6d06d6bf81d3fa0053aca23611ff215.jpgNever noticed that before.  So I got curious and looked for thr EZ Eye stamp and confirmed it.20190726_175157.thumb.jpg.18be76f4d00cb435650a315caf0660bf.jpgI have had this car for 7 years now and never had a clue that I had this option on the car.  Unfortunately, the windshield is damaged.  Looks like it was hit with a few rocks and it also has a 3 inch hairline crack.  I just thought it'd be cool to at least share.

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After much avoidance, I finally decided to remove the front windshield trim and fresh air intake grill.20190726_163954.thumb.jpg.92421e207b27c7708a28370c8aa3c261.jpgFirst, remove the chrome clip at the bottom-center part of the assembly shown here. 20190726_164044.thumb.jpg.06e4410bf9e2d97f9a34f324573f5e30.jpgPull up on the clip from behind with a probe until the clip clears the trim.  Be careful not to scratch the surfaces  of the trim.  Once clear, pull clip away from assembly and remove.  This will reveal a center screw as shown.20190726_165316.thumb.jpg.3b2276de7c534750bf28b10903661361.jpgRemove this screw and this will release one end of both of your bottom trim pieces.  Next, you will pull out the other end of the bottom trim from this joint shown here.20190726_171855.thumb.jpg.8537c9140ca3e3cbff9db500b2ce03a5.jpgTo do this, grab this part of the trim at the front of the bend as seen here.20190726_171913.thumb.jpg.f9bc3e9b861058dec4816ff07d78588e.jpgWiggle the trim up and down while pulling foward on the trim just until it slides out of the joint, as seen here.20190726_172046.thumb.jpg.84511c5eedee66e1f0d167f8e8a706d9.jpgThe bottom trim is still held by one more retainer.  You will need to slide the trim off of this retainer by pulling the trim to the outside of the car, as seen here.20190726_172117.thumb.jpg.3a0e76aede673653f82750dc9cf9ef37.jpgRepeat these steps for the bottom trim on the opposite side.  Once both pieces of bottom trim are removed, this will free up your ability to remove the fresh air intake grills.20190726_173135.thumb.jpg.36b3436dbb438c3fe789dadd48f00705.jpgRemove the 1 screw at each penetration shown here.20190726_165532.thumb.jpg.8688788a5e1ccf9c51e8acb637c9da89.jpgAnd then remove 1 screw at each end of the grill assembly as shown here.20190726_165703.thumb.jpg.62076dc8f634bed0612662bd8c9bf0fc.jpgOnce all 4 screws are removed, the grill assembly should lift up out of the car in 3 pieces.  Removing the grill should expose a few pieces of weatherstrip shown here.  Remove those.20190726_172524.thumb.jpg.816205634b61e3d0bdade35baad4306e.jpgYou can now move onto the side piece trim shown here.20190726_164753.thumb.jpg.566f2b9cfcad411fc001eb4433c0ad9f.jpgRemove the screw that retains the bottom end of the side piece trim as shown here.20190726_174026.thumb.jpg.f9e31723edd5a2f08437e943389ac868.jpgThen, remove both screws shown here.20190726_164807.thumb.jpg.389d280bda58c4fe4dd462807bcdeb1d.jpgYou will then slide the side piece trim from the joint at the top.  You will seperate by wiggling the trim while pulling to the outside of the car as shown here.20190726_174121.thumb.jpg.b3a927a99e57a905b232ab035b75f256.jpgRepeat these steps for the opposite side.  Removal of the side piece trim should now expose retainers for top piece trim as shown here (both sides).20190726_174548.thumb.jpg.ea296f4c2affc196cfae549614158fab.jpgRemove both screws.  

 

***DISCLAIMER***

 

Going foward, I am not entirely sure of the proper way to remove the top piece trim.  Maybe one of the guys on here can add their expertise on removing the top piece trim properly.  This was a trail and error situation for me.  On the backside of the top piece trim, there is a flange with a small lip that is centered on about 75% of the overall trim piece.  On the rubber windshield gasket just underneath this trim, there is a slot that is moulded in it.  That flange on the backside of the trim is actually pushed into and retained by the slot in the rubber windshield gasket and has a very sturdy hold on the top piece trim.   One option (in hindsight) is to pry the trim out of the slotted windshield gasket.  However, the grip was so strong, I didn't choose this option for fear of bending and damaging the trim.  Another option would be to cut the windshield gasket at 2 spots, just to the outside of the trim, until totally separated from the rest of the gasket.  You could then (while inside the car) push this portion of the gasket with trim out from the windshield and frame.  I didn't even think of this before removing and I went with a 3rd option, which was to slide the trim to the outside of the car till it's free from the gasket.  I took a wooden block and a rubber mallet and tapped on one end of the trim until it can slide down no further.  I then went to the side of the trim in the direction it was being pulled out and I had to lift the end of the trim just enough to clear the flange over top of the outer part of the windshield gasket (which was extremely difficult).  Once cleared, carefully pull the trim out as shown here.20190726_191404.thumb.jpg.64b762683e04eb5648bc38b17e43a2c8.jpgHere is a picture showing the flange behind the trim and the slot in the gasket.20190726_191615.thumb.jpg.7bcee1e6908ce84d5c01eede185145cd.jpgHere's another picture of the slot in the gasket. 20190727_111637.thumb.jpg.0a0418cb8866df40c4c39feaef8eb407.jpgFinally, remove the 5 retainers left behind that are mounted at the bottom of the window frame.  Center retainer...20190726_173303.thumb.jpg.a9e3763435537c93a3a66a66fad61316.jpg2 like this...20190726_173236.thumb.jpg.b3003963800b0a0661c07876c9f6f0a4.jpgand then 2 like this.20190726_173229.thumb.jpg.5e49dd81ae3591d0004bb4adcfb1c553.jpgShowing the front windshield trim and fresh air intake grill assembly removed from car.20190726_191830.thumb.jpg.aeec61989212cfa4b831743df576d033.jpgOverall, a challenging task.

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