Kosage Chavis

1955 Buick Century

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1 hour ago, Kosage Chavis said:

...the 55 Buick Century hardtop.

 

That IS my favorite too!  Awesome vehicle!  Great options! 

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19 hours ago, lancemb said:

Are your kids excited to see yours progress after seeing those cars?

My oldest son's interest in our Buick is minimal.  Every once in a while, he will ask about or check on me if I am working on it.  My youngest son, who is only 4, is too young to care.  My daughter is the one who cares the most and will literally sit in the car with me as I work.  It's so funny because it reminds me if when I would sneak into my Dad's Buick when I was a little, just to sit in it.

 

10 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

 

And there's the catch 22 of this hobby!   You can never guarantee any equity in this field,  no matter what the brand or pedigree. 

I hope the Coker family is satisfied with the results of the sale. 

And thanks for the pictures !  Bob did have these cars in Buickful condition , may he rest in peace!

Personally, I couldn't care less how much my car is worth to another person.  It's priceless to me and I imagine that's why Mrs Coker sold those cars for as low as she did.  You are very welcome for the pictures.  

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The auction of the cars begin.20181103_121506.thumb.jpg.aa6055836189bb813e2fb45453bf262c.jpgThen, the man of the hour...Mr Lamar.  Mr Lamar spoke about Mr Coker here.20181103_120755.thumb.jpg.ada6f58c2b9ee76929c3c609d73d500e.jpg

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According to Mr Lamar, Mr Coker was said to be a stickler for being correct when restoring these Buicks.  So well, well, well.  What do we see here?  20181103_102323.thumb.jpg.2f404a8c6fbbcda92e8afeaa0259717b.jpgLooks like we were wrong about that rear speaker switch knob.  Turns out that the rear speaker switch knob is the same style knob you'd find on the Buick AC control panel.  No big deal though, I already have it.  Of course I couldn't avoid Mr Lamar joking with about rear speaker knobs.

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Just got this in the mail today.  A power brake vaccum tank.  It was being sold for a good price and I figured having an extra one of these would be good.  No dents, very light surface rust and holds a vaccum.20190328_162341.thumb.jpg.bc159b23be0a3f0ac6fd83141f8684d3.jpg20190328_162422.thumb.jpg.30079bbffef89f10a582029dc22bf8a7.jpg20190328_162354.thumb.jpg.7b549b2436f34e93ed4624bc809fde2b.jpg20190328_162504.thumb.jpg.a033346197acf96a70cfbce9e9adeb40.jpgCompliments of Ebay.

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I was actually contemplating on bidding on this same tank for the same reasoning! Glad to see that YOU snatched it up!

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Today I was finally able to start work back up on the Buick.  I am now at a point in the garage where I can do some other things.  So, here we go...the first thing I removed was the engine fan and associated pulleys.20190331_152241.thumb.jpg.62e430aa9b78d971b2fb9f2eefd566d2.jpgJust remove the 4 bolts on front of the fan.20190331_152633.thumb.jpg.a4cab2536b39f14a5cf8fb8ed079799d.jpgBe sure to grab the pulley spacers when removing.  Here is a shot of the site after removal.20190331_154440.thumb.jpg.9891c77b7a4e89903461f142ea735b1c.jpgThe fan, spacers and pulleys after removal.20190331_154520.thumb.jpg.13b11dfcf71b32a1c16975d67aabf058.jpgOverall, a very easy task.

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Next up was the radiator and shroud.20190331_155439.thumb.jpg.4ded770b86e0c8637438627e1250790c.jpgRemove the upper radiator hose at both clamps.20190331_155500.thumb.jpg.15f30503a0ab4a2b4fa28360f568778b.jpgRemove the lower radiator hose at both clamps.20190331_160214.thumb.jpg.0c065f73e359bf20d69e3a9a0e6531cf.jpgThen remove the smaller radiator hose at the bottom.  20190331_162410.thumb.jpg.ed6db6d201ef730de20aec332cd7fd51.jpgRemove 4 screws total, with 2 on each side to remove the radiator/shroud.20190331_161246.thumb.jpg.fb1af58a4e6d2c2acabb673a334f7850.jpgSite after radiator/shroud removal.20190331_163939.thumb.jpg.7587e50168e56f0351c6337154ec5e05.jpg20190331_164004.thumb.jpg.b43f50ccdafc671cbeea1af128faca09.jpgThe radiator/shroud after removal.20190331_164022.thumb.jpg.16c2fe0d42082b5eb7607fd1eae5e0b7.jpgOverall, this is moderately easy task.  The hoses were stuck and the radiator with the shroud still mounted is somewhat heavy.  But other than that, pretty easy.  

 

Hope to get some more done next weekend.

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Hey Kosage, great to see you back on the Buick!

When you get a chance and you remove the AC bracket, can you scan it with a computer printer? (Like tape it with masking tape, then tap out the holes and stuff and scan it with a blanket over the top). I'd like to see about making one. I did something similar to this making a oil pan for the formula club and it worked great! All you need is the scan, then you convert it to a DXF drawing and you just take the measurement between two holes to scale it up. Works pretty well! You could make a quality reproduction that way. I guess the hardest part would be getting the side that goes to the head bolt. It also looks like you have the support that goes to the intake manifold, too. Very cool!

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Hey there! Just felt like chiming in here for a second to tell you to treat that radiator with the upmost care, even though it’ll most likely be getting rebuilt before you reinstall it; being that it’s the (or, at least I’m presuming here) correct radiator for Factory A/C! They seem to be next to impossible to find, in ANY condition!  If it is the correct HAR/RI/SON Factory A/C radiator, it’ll have the part number 3133727. Standard radiator is 3131177.

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I can’t remember if you’ve already covered any details about these radiators in the past or not.

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On 4/1/2019 at 1:31 AM, Beemon said:

Hey Kosage, great to see you back on the Buick!

When you get a chance and you remove the AC bracket, can you scan it with a computer printer? (Like tape it with masking tape, then tap out the holes and stuff and scan it with a blanket over the top). I'd like to see about making one. I did something similar to this making a oil pan for the formula club and it worked great! All you need is the scan, then you convert it to a DXF drawing and you just take the measurement between two holes to scale it up. Works pretty well! You could make a quality reproduction that way. I guess the hardest part would be getting the side that goes to the head bolt. It also looks like you have the support that goes to the intake manifold, too. Very cool!

Hey Ben!  Are you asking me to get the AC brackets printed because you want a set or just for the sake of trying it out.  Just want to be sure I am understanding you.

 

On 4/7/2019 at 10:31 PM, Sean Batiz said:

Hey there! Just felt like chiming in here for a second to tell you to treat that radiator with the upmost care, even though it’ll most likely be getting rebuilt before you reinstall it; being that it’s the (or, at least I’m presuming here) correct radiator for Factory A/C! They seem to be next to impossible to find, in ANY condition!  If it is the correct HAR/RI/SON Factory A/C radiator, it’ll have the part number 3133727. Standard radiator is 3131177.

Hey Sean!  I do not have the AC radiator, but I have been told by people who had both, that they could not find the difference between the AC and non-AC radiator.  Have you found something?  If so, post some pictures.  I am sure there are others who would like to see as well.  Thank you.

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Per your request: Here are comparative pictures of the two radiators that I have here; the only overtly obvious detail that I can clearly determine visually between the two of them is, the depth (thickness) of the upper and lower tanks. The one that has its mounting flange halfway loose from its soldiering joint, is the A/C unit. I am curious now to consider de-soldiering both tanks from both radiators to visually inspect the actual cores themselves for any obvious differences. Whatever damages are present in either of these two radiators that can be seen, was already existing before my acquisition of them.

39C9FB99-5B34-40D9-A63C-DFD447E087F9.jpeg

C8B43C07-0392-4B3D-B6FE-87AE7AF13C7F.jpeg

6F38E070-61A2-4417-BC5B-A5DA42EB3487.jpeg

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Actually, just as I reviewed the previous message and pictures that I posted, I noticed that the actual highth of the cores is different! I really didn’t notice this detail until now! Rather obvious. I’ll head out to make measurements.

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Got back to some business today and removed both ventilation air duct dash opening covers.20190407_185808.thumb.jpg.e17d307d3a43aa3b0565f04515cd0361.jpgJust remove flange screws.  Driver's side has less screws than the passenger's side.  I also used a small putty knife to pry the cover off of the firewall.20190414_125602.thumb.jpg.b84012cfcb9978b60750dfa5e07f9b9b.jpgAlso, loosen the single bolt that holds down this arm.20190414_130917.thumb.jpg.88f3501e5018b482fc4206b4a66a829e.jpgThis will give you a little more room to remove the driver's side cover.  You will have to finesse the cover when pulling out with both drainage hoses still attached to it.  

 

Removing the passenger's side cover has a similar issue.  Once screws are removed, you will have to finesse it to get it passed the valve cover and fins shown here.20190414_134635.thumb.jpg.d5aa28bba91658b32c9fcc313a01b46f.jpgOnce you get passed this, finesse again to pull out with attached drainage hoses.  Here, showing the site of removal.20190414_134719.thumb.jpg.85d6a9757d6dc4765840f139dc59038c.jpgShowing the ventilation air duct dash opening covers removed from car.20190414_134404.thumb.jpg.c8f782eb850fdca8fec480702400a4b9.jpgOverall,  this was an easy task.

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So, after going through the sometimes frustrating, rather confusing jargon of part number breakdowns that are listed in the original Buick Master Chassis Parts Book that I have here for the “Model  years, 1930 to 1955 inclusive”, it seems to state that your ‘55 Century Model 66R, calls for this same A/C radiator of the part number, 3133727 “but”, the only real measurement difference that I can tell that is truly different between these, is a height of 1” MORE for the core vs. the standard radiator. This said though, I have had my standard radiator (p#3131177) rebuilt awhile back & opted at the time to have an additional core added to its core thickness. Which measures @ 2.75” vs. the core thickness of this A/C radiator which only measures at an even 2” thick. So, I’d be willing to wager that if you just did this same thing of having your original one rebuilt with a thicker, 2.75” core cake, it’d most likely be more than adequate for whatever cooling demands that your Nailhead will require, without any noticeable overheating issues.

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I’m assuming that you discovered quite a substantial amount of debris in behind those covers? Especially the passenger side unit? I removed those from mine AFTER I already had the front clip and engine removed! I’m guessing that you have at least one finger/knuckle that’s a bit damaged now? “No Pain, No Gain”!

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1 hour ago, Sean Batiz said:

Actually, just as I reviewed the previous message and pictures that I posted, I noticed that the actual highth of the cores is different! I really didn’t notice this detail until now! Rather obvious. I’ll head out to make measurements.

I am not seeing part number 3131177.  I do see 3133727 in the parts book. 

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Yesterday, I also removed the power steering pump and associated brackets.20190414_135856.thumb.jpg.414cad0833c5868686978ba20e6f8d19.jpgThe first thing that I wanted to do was to drain the fluid from the resevoir.  I didn't have anything small enough to fit under the rear fittings to catch the fluid, so I decided to remove the pump with the fluid still in it.  I tightened the top bolt just enough so the seal would be tight enough to prevent leakage.  I then placed 2 wrenches on the flared fittings to loosen them.  20190414_141702.thumb.jpg.5efbae986ad99912518530a2f4c5be4b.jpg20190414_142517.thumb.jpg.027ba1b16c452f98b1966f8bb73c33ac.jpgAgain, I only wanted these fittings to be loosened.  After this was done, I used my fingers to tighten back the fittings to keep from leaking.  Here's a picture that shows the hose layout (for future reference).20190414_135912.thumb.jpg.1e6f6a798c5690b7e0cb6d34d3a5ea81.jpgI then removed the upper nut/bolt with the 2 lower bolts that mounts the power steering pump bracket.  20190414_143958.thumb.jpg.a07058c3c4f2067791256c4c8be75b75.jpgKeep in mind that loosening the lower 2 bolts also might cause coolant to leak.  Most of the coolant has already been drained from my car, so this was no worry to me.  After the bracket was freed from the engine, I layed the pump down so that the fittings pointed up.20190414_144344.thumb.jpg.dc08410091eb4f21d60bdfce4a084adf.jpgI used my fingers to detach both hoses from the pump fittings and moved them to the side.  The pump assembly was then carried to my garage to empty the fluid.  After doing so, I removed the cylinder head-to-bracket bolt to remove the stabilizing arm bracket shown here.20190414_145419.thumb.jpg.1e9d482fc9196e5e89a13ba34dd572c5.jpgShowing the removal site with power steering pump and associated brackets removed.20190414_151355.thumb.jpg.33ad899cb569ee585192824c8c4860c3.jpgNow showing the pump assembly and brackets after removal.20190414_151337.thumb.jpg.b75fc032a8d31f17e302a04405d40515.jpgOverall, this was an easy task.

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On 4/14/2019 at 5:24 PM, Kosage Chavis said:

I am not seeing part number 3131177.  I do see 3133727 in the parts book. 

3131177  is a 54 radiator for 50/60/70 Dynaflow cars without AC.

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8 hours ago, Fr. Buick said:
On 4/14/2019 at 7:24 PM, Kosage Chavis said:

I am not seeing part number 3131177.  I do see 3133727 in the parts book. 

3131177  is a 54 radiator for 50/60/70 Dynaflow cars without AC.

Not uncommon to have "54 radiator" on early 55's.

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Interesting!  I didn't think it would have fit...

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On 4/14/2019 at 5:42 PM, Sean Batiz said:

Per your request: Here are comparative pictures of the two radiators that I have here; the only overtly obvious detail that I can clearly determine visually between the two of them is, the depth (thickness) of the upper and lower tanks. The one that has its mounting flange halfway loose from its soldiering joint, is the A/C unit. I am curious now to consider de-soldiering both tanks from both radiators to visually inspect the actual cores themselves for any obvious differences. Whatever damages are present in either of these two radiators that can be seen, was already existing before my acquisition of them.

39C9FB99-5B34-40D9-A63C-DFD447E087F9.jpeg

C8B43C07-0392-4B3D-B6FE-87AE7AF13C7F.jpeg

6F38E070-61A2-4417-BC5B-A5DA42EB3487.jpeg

Look at the top of the core through the tank opening.  See if they appear to have the same number and size of tubes.  If there is a significant capacity difference you can usually tell just by doing that. 

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