Kosage Chavis

1955 Buick Century

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Next I removed a ceramic resister.  Just remove the screw while holding resistor in place to keep from falling.20170402_163251.thumb.jpg.01325cf1658f3b2c672d32f32758b2f9.jpgShowing ceramic resistor removed from car.20170402_163350.thumb.jpg.89bccfff3a200ca92188f1f85459d345.jpgOverall, easy task.

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Finally, I removed the pair of horns.20170402_162617.thumb.jpg.41e3102bf92912da73baf773c43b090c.jpgJust detach the lead wire and label. Then remove 2 mounting bolts shown here.20170402_162727.thumb.jpg.cc53ed68c2b1773798ece6cc65c5e76a.jpgShowing pair of horns removed from car.20170402_162838.thumb.jpg.d3962b5afb6202af527ebb0624634c5c.jpgOverall, easy task.

Edited by Kosage Chavis (see edit history)
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Removed more parts on this beautiful day.  Started with the heater core.  20170408_164348.thumb.jpg.07a7f0a51ad8eddb51efe2e6b4af87a3.jpgLoosen both hose clamps.  Hoses will more than likely be stuck on nipples.  Gently loosen hoses with a pair of plyers.  Pull hoses off of nipples.20170408_164409.thumb.jpg.0df8112b512f9bf0887b29b621eec4ef.jpgNext, you'll have to remove 2 flange bolts to remove the heater core.  Access to the bolts are from the inside of the car.  Remove 2 bolts shown here (top & bottom).20170408_164912.thumb.jpg.b17bc84da237f205d3436cc46cd8eea3.jpgMove back to the outside of the car and grab the duct opening of the heater core and gently tug at it till the heater core separates from the body of the car.  Showing the area after removal.20170408_165248.thumb.jpg.880b4c8e7b2810f1eb35e0a28e6233b1.jpgShowing the heater core removed from car.  20170408_165310.thumb.jpg.5672bde57cd3ac1329ebc752e112de8e.jpgOverall, easy task.

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Next was the removal of the generator.20170408_170931.thumb.jpg.7521828867d7cd164a6adf2e6beef6ac.jpgRemove 3 electrical connections and remove wire from clip.  Label.20170408_170942.thumb.jpg.bdb81bba9f7db353bd7fdbfcc35c5fc7.jpgRemove the front engine-to-generator brace by removing a bolt on the generator side and a nut on the engine side.20170408_171522.thumb.jpg.67dd33848c31b7871b1beab095cd4696.jpgNext, remove both pivot bolts at the bottom side of generator.  There is one at the back as shown here.20170408_172037.thumb.jpg.2c5c502680661cd2a89eed95c47f1206.jpgAnd there is one at the front as shown here.20170408_172052.thumb.jpg.5b5dc110f7cd76b00a3e2cb732084d5e.jpgNote that both of these pivot bolts connect to a nut on the other side as shown here.20170408_172616.thumb.jpg.0b6d6f12d155a88dc6f662d23bc9ba5f.jpgOnce both pivot bolts are removed, pull the generator up and out.  Showing the area after removing of the generator.20170408_173025.thumb.jpg.07017bf5a23c7257817f6636f611c34e.jpgShowing the generator removed from car.20170408_172954.thumb.jpg.a4576898613f442c9c7c65dc0e7e468c.jpgOverall, easy task. 

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Hold on to that capacitor, they don't make them anymore. 

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Next, I removed the access cover for the brake master cylinder.  Just grab it!20170408_173804.thumb.jpg.bc88bbd27ff6c80836143da69ead1f81.jpgShowing area after removal.20170408_173813.thumb.jpg.9dae3c2409c97f11887a9d066079bd25.jpgShowing access cover after removal.20170408_173838.thumb.jpg.e5f314d265aa029b1249f4d9f0f98c9b.jpgOverall, easy task.

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So, I took a chance on an ebay part.  I purchased what was described as power rear quarter window parts from a 1955 Oldsmobile 2 door hardtop.  Parts included a regulator with motor still mounted to it, a door opening lever, and 2 sets of guides.  Here's a couple of photos of the parts.20170410_181710.thumb.jpg.9a033986be024f18a8fe46c839c09451.jpg20170410_181732.thumb.jpg.0a4e821e856fbbea842888caee7b9a43.jpgI bench tested the motor and it works very well.  Only question is...is this the correct regulator for my car?  I found a stamp on the arm of the regulator and searched for it in my interchange manual.  It does not show up anywhere. Here's a photo of the stamp.20170410_182826.thumb.jpg.d24d87fef923324d76467302bc182c99.jpgI am hoping someone can help me out with this.  Thank you.

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I had a few minutes to spare this evening and decided to take Mr. Willie's advice dealing on whether the regulator I took a chance on will fit my car properly. I took the regulator out to the driver's side of my car and held it in place to see if the mounting holes matched up with any existing flat surface.20170413_183502.thumb.jpg.0cd73c4a370cad547cfc504694560829.jpgAfter fooling around with the placement, it looks to me that these 2 mounting holes that are circled at the top will be used and the flat surface area that is circled at the bottom will become a new mounting surface.20170413_192756.thumb.jpg.9a4e5637c2ab5ac1ee81127372fd0146.jpgThere is also a small flat surface shown here that seems to be another mounting surface.20170413_185739.thumb.jpg.97f8c3181f981b6069634745bd6b4621.jpgThe fact that there is a factory hole provided where I am pointing to, to give access to possible mounting hardware makes my theory more credible.20170413_183623.thumb.jpg.75393b9674d6fa4a664831f134b84a1c.jpgHere's a photo showing the angle at which the regulator would be installed if I am correct.  I also matched 3 of the mounting holes on the regulator with the body.  20170413_191512.thumb.jpg.0803ca5e8e33eb00c7bf01c15b23d838.jpgThis alone makes me pretty confident that this is the correct power regulator for my car, but to be more sure I took one of the guides (the longer of the 2) and installed to see if it fit.  The holes lined up perfectly.  If the guy was telling me the truth that all these pieces (regulator and guides) came off the same car, then I am even more confident I have the correct power regulator.  

 

Please feel free if there is anything to add.

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I just purchased another power window regulator from ebay.  This one is described as the front passenger's side regulator that came from a 1955 88/89 series Oldsmobile, 2 door, hardtop with power windows.  Again, I am taking a chance on this part, but everything about this part seems correct.  I should receive this part next week.  So, I will report back the following weekend.

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Did a few more removals over the weekend.  Started with both rear bumper braces.20170415_142317.thumb.jpg.65e5067f9496aaeb933d56ad9f579437.jpgOnly 3 bolts mounts this into place.  1 at the rear and 2 on the sides. 20170415_142337.thumb.jpg.eb13d5bc3f6454e6eaad2875d287d4f2.jpgBe sure the secure the bolts on the far sides when removing.  Hold the brace assembly in place as you slide the bolts out of their holes.  You want to keep this heavy brace from falling and doing damage to where the brace penetrates the body of the car.  Carefully slide the arm of the brace out of the body.  The opposite side is removed in the same manner.  Showing the area after removal.20170415_211431.thumb.jpg.02af65273eca545f5925a4f3885cfed8.jpgShowing both braces removed from car.20170415_150835.thumb.jpg.d613a50d673982409b28aaa5c1026521.jpgOverall, easy task.

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Next, removed both front bumper braces.20170416_134944.thumb.jpg.b1bbf576e65e441df8dc809e7a9f394e.jpgOnly 2 bolts hold one of these braces in its place.  20170416_135013.thumb.jpg.ec8bfa12a5f9dca2d90779501004be80.jpgAgain, you will have to secure the bolts on the far side while removing.  Hold the brace in place while sliding out both bolts.  Note that these braces have shims and some may fall out when removing the bolts.  Each brace had 3 shims on my car.  Once bolts are removed, carefully angle the brace out of where it penetrates the front apron of the car.  Opposite side is identical. Showing area after removal.20170416_144450.thumb.jpg.805616b4560f58f7d227a278bb7e96ba.jpgShowing both braces removed from car.20170416_144430.thumb.jpg.9ce42c13bac7a3f1156e0eca09ec5454.jpgOverall, easy task.

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It does not appear the nuts and bolts provided to much resistance in wanting to come loose.  My Buicks have been the same when removing a nut or bolt that has been secured over 60 years.  It amazes me.     

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5 hours ago, avgwarhawk said:

It does not appear the nuts and bolts provided to much resistance in wanting to come loose.  My Buicks have been the same when removing a nut or bolt that has been secured over 60 years.  It amazes me.     

I feel you.  Can't get that type of respect from these newer cars when you work on them.

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38 minutes ago, Kosage Chavis said:

I feel you.  Can't get that type of respect from these newer cars when you work on them.

 

Yep.   I have yet to need any heat on my Buicks.  Can't say that on my wife's 2006 Mercury Mountaineer.   

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Finally, I removed the ranco valve.20170416_145646.thumb.jpg.6bb0c26221cd8c2a0a57d3eff4ceb073.jpgStart by removing both hose ends.  I had to use plyers to get the hoses from being stuck.  Just don't apply too much pressure to the plyers, as this might damage the copper nipples on the valve. Once loose, slide hose ends off of nipples and label.  You now have clear access to both mounting screws shown here (1 at top and 1 at bottom).20170416_150408.thumb.jpg.5c5bf638b23ccb187bc008174e4e10bf.jpgRemove both screws.  Gently pull the ranco valve out by angling out from the bottom.  You might have to manipulate a little to pull out completely.  Also be sure the capillary tubing on the other side does not get caught on anything while pulling out.  Showing the area after removal.20170416_150716.thumb.jpg.74b959f19f208bc7f25d824a287457f9.jpgShowing ranco valve and associated upper heater hose removed from car.20170416_150755.thumb.jpg.ac394547f8395bc734c83b15d080bca4.jpgOverall, easy task. 

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Kosage, you're gonna love those labels and pics when it comes time to put it back together.  Even if you don't reuse it, there's so much "forensic" information. 

 

Do you ever take a break from all the dismantling and pick out something to restore?  I have a hard time staying hooked up to the same thing for any length of time.

 

Also, I love the way you leave us readers by saying, "Overall, easy task."  That always tells me you're up for whatever comes next!

 

Thanks for sharing,

Joel

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11 minutes ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Kosage, you're gonna love those labels and pics when it comes time to put it back together.  Even if you don't reuse it, there's so much "forensic" information. 

 

Do you ever take a break from all the dismantling and pick out something to restore?  I have a hard time staying hooked up to the same thing for any length of time.

 

Also, I love the way you leave us readers by saying, "Overall, easy task."  That always tells me you're up for whatever comes next!

Hey Mr Joel!  It's good to hear from you. Yes, when I bought this car a few years ago, I knew (with 3 young kids) that time and money would be very limited for me to do anything with this car.  So I figured, taking it apart doesn't cost me anything. As far as time goes, I could just spend one hour here and an hour there without sacrificing too much time from family.  

 

The second part of my dilemma was money, so I had to spend my money right if I got a little extra at times.  I had to make a choice between the availability of restoration and the availability of desired original acessories/parts.  The amount of available original parts are finite and will continue to diminish over time, so I decided to hold off on restoration while purchasing all of my desired parts for my car.  By the time I am done purchasing my desired parts and dismantling my car (God willing), my kids will be a little older which should give me a little more time to mess with the car (I hope).

 

I also don't have a big enough garage to do a restoration.  Hopefully, at some point during the removal process, we can build one that would accommodate such a task.  That's one reason why I was so drawn to your garage thread.  

 

As far as breaks go, they come during the work week when I have no time to do anything with the car.  So by the time the weekend rolls around, I am just aching to do something else with it.  I think it's impossible for me to get tired of this process.  It's always a new adventure for me and I am doing to mine what my Dad couldn't do to his before he was forced to sell it when I was a kid.  

 

I really appreciate that you are enjoying my thread.  It makes this journey so much more worth while.  In addition, I would love to see more people take an interest in fixing up these old Buicks.  I just want to provide other people with limited knowledge  (such as myself) with some sort of encouragement that tackling something like this is doable.  I appreciate your time in taking some time to go through my thread and provide the positive feedback.  Until the next time, be blessed Mr Joel.

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Thanks for taking the time to expose some of the personal side of this hobby.  Your way makes a lot of sense and I find it fascinating that there are so many approaches to the same end point and they are all individualized.  Another interesting part of this hobby is that, at least from my view, is that the happiest or most satisfied hobbyists are those who work on and regularly drive their cars and make improvements but with respect to originality of the time.

 

An example of this are those power windows that you'll be using.  That car may not have started its life with them, but they will belong to the car if that is what you want.

 

There's a lot that can be done by just cleaning stuff and painting parts - even with good quality rattle can paint.  So, you'll be able to do so much of the work without a huge investment and I wouldn't replace things that aren't worn out; wheel bearings and even brake shoes with remaining life come to mind. 

 

Many years ago I designed a shop  that is about 30 wide by 48 long.  It's free standing, no trusses and tall enough to do just about anything.  I'll take a pic for you.  It still can be built inexpensively and you and a friend could do it.  

 

Thanks again and I look forward to following all those easy tasks.

 

Joel

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Kosage,

 

Just a tip on the rubber heater hoses for your next Buick(and there will be :)), I use a razor to split the hose were it covers the brass tube to the valve, core or neck of the radiator.   Peel back like a banana skin.   I can't tell you how many times I pulled and pried with pliers and screwdrivers attempting to free up a hose I was going to replace anyway.

 

Thanks for the pics of taking out the core/valves etc.   I will be doing that soon on my 54.        

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Unfortunately, I will have to take a brief hiatus from any further removals from the Buick.  I will be doing some small improvements to our garage (new drywall, insulation, electrical, storage and lighting).  I hope this takes no longer than a month.  Once I am done, I'm jumping right back on the Buick.  

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Today, I just received another power window regulator.  It was described as coming off a 1955 Oldsmobile, 2 door, hardtop, for front door.  Again, I took a chance on this and will have to make sure it is correct.  Here's a couple of shots of the regulator.20170419_162721.thumb.jpg.a0ca486a442d7455dfa1f40b8c7ac84c.jpg20170419_162823.thumb.jpg.d24e02e28cc087131dc78271f362570f.jpgIf this is a correct power regulator, then all I will need now are 2 more (1 front and 1 rear).

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I went ahead and took the new regulator out to my shed where both my car doors are stored.  I held up the power regulator to the door and observed that it should work fine.  However, it looks like I would have to template a whole new set of mounting holes on the door to have it installed correctly.

 

I also looked at the master body parts book to compare the illustration with my part and my part is identical to what is shown in the book.  

 

So in conclusion, I am pretty confident that I have the proper power regulator for my car.

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Finding out that something will work at this time of night always makes for a good night's sleep!

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12 minutes ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Finding out that something will work at this time of night always makes for a good night's sleep!

Couldn't agree with you more Mr Joel!

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