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Dynoflow woes.........


saints
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if it wasnt for bad luck i wouldnt have any at all..... im not giving up on her though. Ok came home from work and i went to take her out for a drive. started the engine and I put her in drive and nothing. it didnt move. thought that was odd and then hit the gas. still nothing. got out checked fluid was barely on dipstick so filled her up. tried again. nothing. I have low and reveres but not drive. so is it toast?

also I have another transmission the guy i bought it from said it leaked like mad and thats why he pulled it. he never said anything about weather it worked or not. 

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Well, I'd say you are lucky to have a spare...

 

The seals used back in the days when these transmissions were new were terrible.  Seal material technology is much better today.  Leaking like mad is to be expected; you can buy an external seal kit from Fatsco for about $76.  They also have torque ball kits.  The question becomes how far you want to trust it.

 

Ours leaked like mad, too.  We had done the torque ball a couple years ago, but now the front seal was becoming a gusher.  We got an external seal kit and took the car to a local guy who cut his teeth on Dynaflows back in the 60s.  We thought we were in for about a $500 service, but found that we had lost a bearing up front so we had friction between parts in the torque converter that should never touch each other.  There was a significant amount of metal in the fluid, but it never got pumped out to the rest of the transmission.  Our project cost skyrocketed pretty quickly.

 

Personally, I would find a few of the oldest locally owned transmission shops in the Tulsa area, and go around and talk to them.  Find some old-timer that knows Dynaflows and has a passion for old cars.  Think of it as a job interview, because you are looking for someone with a specific skill set and have to decide who you are going to hire.  Once you pick a shop, come up with a game plan that works for both of you.

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You don't state what year you are having trouble with but there is a couple that sells rebuilt Dynaflows for 1949's on eBay now and then.  They are out of the dustbowl state of Oklahoma, I do believe.  I bet they would fix it for you., 

Edited by Dan O (see edit history)
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The pump relies on its tolerence to maintain a prime through the surface tension of the fluid. Wear can cause a loss of prime overnight. Mine does that sometimes. Just let her sit and run for a while and it will pick up suction. Once it gets suction it's good all day. I figure whoever gets my car from the estate auction will wanna fix that right away.

If your pickup is plugged it might make establishing a suction harder.

Bernie

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ok Im going to try and maybe change the filter or pull the pan and look for debris. I found a place to rebuild it the estimate was $3500 gah! that hit me a little hard. but he did say bring in both and he will try and make one good one. Hes willing to work with me. He does want to drive it and look it over to make sure Im not missing something like an adjustment or what ever. I love the car so im going to do what ever to get it back up. especially since I have a large box full of goodies ready to go on it to make it a daily driver. or at least something I can rely on a bit more.

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14 hours ago, Airy Cat said:

The high band anchor might be broken.

There should be low and reverse bands; drive is from clutches.

1 hour ago, 60FlatTop said:

The pump relies on its tolerence to maintain a prime through the surface tension of the fluid. Wear can cause a loss of prime overnight. Mine does that sometimes. Just let her sit and run for a while and it will pick up suction. Once it gets suction it's good all day. I figure whoever gets my car from the estate auction will wanna fix that right away.

If your pickup is plugged it might make establishing a suction harder.

Bernie

Clean the pan and filter and do the pressure tests as (hopefully) outlined in your service manual.  Again hopefully there is a diagram in the service manual that shows what is happening in each shifter position.

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I'm not much of a "mechanic in a can" guy, but I did put a can of Trans-X conditioner in my car a couple of years ago and noticed an improvement.

 

I drove the car about 20 miles before I put it in and then immediately drove another 20 to give it good circulation.

Bernie

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Means the case is full (or very aerated)

I know as much about these dynaflows as you, only advice I can give you is not to mess with it until you understand whats going on.

Wait for your manual (at least) and study it first until you get what is happening and why

Automatic transmission is another name for can of worms and if you stuff it up messing with it, it will cost you much more

 

Mick

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well I have found a shop and he told me he would blow it apart and work with me to gt me back on the road. I picked up another trans in the mean time that the owner didnt know the condition but pulled it because in his words gushed fluid. so the shop said bring me both and ill make you one good one if he can. so i will be back on the road hopefully soon and not to the tune of $3500 

19 hours ago, old-tank said:

Where exactly?

the vent tube at the top of the trans. i put it in gear and it started poring out. so I stopped and let it be till I talked to a trans shop

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It is not that uncommon for the torque converter on even a normally functioning dynaflow to drain back into the pan.  When started the air in the now filling torque converter is expelled and forces fluid out of (usually) the dipstick pipe and sometime the vent.

Even if you are going to pull the transmission for rebuild, it is a good idea to do the pressure checks.

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Yes Willie is very correct as performing the psi tests in all ranges will tell you exactly where deficiencies preside and may be hidden just by looking at the parts later.   Make a written note of the results and then while tearing down the sections of the trans, you can be looking for specific culprits as a result of the psi tests.

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On 5/3/2016 at 11:48 AM, 60FlatTop said:

The pump relies on its tolerence to maintain a prime through the surface tension of the fluid. Wear can cause a loss of prime overnight. Mine does that sometimes. Just let her sit and run for a while and it will pick up suction. Once it gets suction it's good all day. I figure whoever gets my car from the estate auction will wanna fix that right away.

If your pickup is plugged it might make establishing a suction harder.

Bernie

 

Be conscious of the fact that an overhaul kit does nothing with the pumps.  Once we were in full teardown mode due to metal in the fluid, we found that both pumps were out of spec.  Cha-ching.  If you are getting quotes from shops around town, ask about worse-case pricing with the replacement of the pumps.

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yea I make up some gauges for testing the pressures. can I do that buy running the car with the wheels up in the air? or do I pull the trans and power it by a drill or air motor to get the best readings. just not sure I can hook all the places up with gauges with it in. I got the book in and I am going through it now. Thanks you for all the info. Is this somthing I should try and rebuild myself? as Im looking in the book and it doesn't really call for any special tools that I can see. I have rebuilt three speeds quite a few times.  but this will be my first automatic and a dynaflow at that.

 

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You can test with it installed and all the pressure ports can be accessed (easiest if over a service pit or on a 4-post lift).  Run the car with one rear wheel jacked up.

You should be able to rebuild yourself IF it has never been messed with before.  Many have had shoddy assembly with parts left out or in the wrong order and even parts from other years substituted.  If you don't recognize this you are in trouble.

Willie

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I would be interested in a continuation of this thread, you know, pictures as you go along the road to fixed

 

Sometimes a bit painful remembering to take pictures as you go, but sometimes it can save you if you do something wrong or forget how something was

 

Mick

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  • 1 month later...
On 5/2/2016 at 10:46 PM, Airy Cat said:

The high band anchor might be broken.

No high band in a Dynaflow, only a clutch pak that engages when in drive. There is a high accumulator which slows the engagement of the clutch pak. It is between the torque converter housing and the main body of the transmission. Another accumulator for the Lo range is on the opposite side from the high accumulator. I would check the high accumulator first to see if that is leaking or not working correctly.

 

These transmissions are pretty easy to rebuild. The big issue is removing from the car. All that torque tube stuff, along with rear end has to be moved back to get the transmission out.

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