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What is my car worth?


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It can't possibly be cheap enough. I sold this one for less than $10,000. Low mileage, great colors, rust free, running and driving, felt like a new car. If you think you can elevate that one to this level for less than $10,000 then maybe you should buy it. But if you can't (and that color sure won't help at resale time, so figure maybe $7500), then let it go.

 

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They can't all be saved and grabbing cars up because they're cheap just wastes resources that you could dedicate to finishing other cars. My father never learned that lesson. At one point we had 12 or 13 mediocre cars instead of one really great one. The crappy ones broke his spirit, gave him constant fits, required time and resources that he didn't have, and never gave him more than a fleeting moment of pleasure. Or he could have invested that money in something significant and high-quality and enjoyed the hobby.

 

Stop grabbing driftwood and put your resources towards something worthy. A battered old 4-door sedan doesn't need to be rescued or preserved for the future when someone else might possibly get around to restoring it.

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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For 1200 I would buy it,  probably because I like 62 Chryslers and that's as cheap as they get as long as it's not rusted and the chrome is pretty good as is the interior. As Matt mentioned not really worth alot of money but if you can get it up and running on your own for a 1000-2000 and it's a decent presentable car there will be a market to 5,000 as an entry level car.  Beyond that you will have too much competition in more desirable models to even garner much interest. 

It's a car  I would just use as a daily driver in the summer for fun.  I actually like this flooky style and looked at one that was not nearly as good from what I can see for more money 15 years ago.  This is the Northeast though.  Location may have a big effect on value. 

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3 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

It can't possibly be cheap enough. I sold this one for less than $10,000. Low mileage, great colors, rust free, running and driving, felt like a new car. If you think you can elevate that one to this level for less than $10,000 then maybe you should buy it. But if you can't (and that color sure won't help at resale time, so figure maybe $7500), then let it go.

 

007.jpg

 

They can't all be saved and grabbing cars up because they're cheap just wastes resources that you could dedicate to finishing other cars. My father never learned that lesson. At one point we had 12 or 13 mediocre cars instead of one really great one. The crappy ones broke his spirit, gave him constant fits, required time and resources that he didn't have, and never gave him more than a fleeting moment of pleasure. Or he could have invested that money in something significant and high-quality and enjoyed the hobby.

 

Stop grabbing driftwood and put your resources towards something worthy. A battered old 4-door sedan doesn't need to be rescued or preserved for the future when someone else might possibly get around to restoring it.

Matt,

I disagree. It appears you buy cars to flip. This car, judging from only 1 photo looks to be in very nice condition. It's not a battered old sedan. If & it's a big if, all of the body & underside are as nice as what's shown in the photo, & if the interior can be cleaned & saved, then that leaves the usual mechanical maintenance due from sitting: brakes, fuel system, ignition system, cooling system, belts, & hoses. You're into it for $1200 cost + repairs/maintenance as I listed maybe $1800 = $3000 for what may be a good clean entry level car or a nice daily driver. Not everyone can afford a high end classic. This may be just the ticket for a family guy or a kid that wants something besides a rice burner. Maybe the black one you "grabbed up" you paid too much for & didn't realize the profit you figured. I've bought numerous cars like this, did the minor repairs & maintenance, had fun with them for a year or two & then sold them, never at a loss, but not at any great profit. I guess I am not as interested in the bottom line as I am in having fun in this "hobby" doing it my way. If the car was anywhere near the Twin Cities, MN I'd be on it like white on rice.

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I'd buy it in a flash if it is as good as it looks in that 1 picture. But, I like Chryslers and the 1962 is one of the best. I know how to work on them and am not out to make a fast buck. I would be very happy putting another $1000 or $2000 in that car and having a nice driver. But, I doubt it would cost that much for me to put it back in commission/

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Some of the comments here to for make me sad and somewhat mad while Matt has some points I tend for favor the comments by Mr. Smolinski. The attitude of it's just another old four sedan, not worth much now and never will be. I think needs to be tempered with a statement like when their all gone we'll wonder why more weren't saved. I'd sooner see something like this car saved and driven than to have to cut to pieces for some "terminal rust bucket" that will never be worth all the time and money spent on it. Practicality and Logic need to be part of our thinking in this hobby we all enjoy but they should not be the only guide lines. This particular car looks to be a good/great entry level into our hobby. So I say go for it,enjoy it and the new hobby you've just started. We all understand or should that we can't save every car but this one looks like a saver to me. Just my 2 coppers worth.......   

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I'm with George on this one, " If the car was anywhere near the Twin Cities, MN I'd be on it like white on rice."  I know MOPAR collector that keeps several grand cash on hand that would gobble this thing up just for it's parts and if it were only $1,200 to own, whether it be a Sunday driver time machine, or a parts car, I could get out of it if I had to. Unfortunately transport cross country adds to much to the cost and for me it's geographically undesirable.

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1 hour ago, Mark Simmons said:

Some of the comments here to for make me sad and somewhat mad while Matt has some points I tend for favor the comments by Mr. Smolinski. The attitude of it's just another old four sedan, not worth much now and never will be. I think needs to be tempered with a statement like when their all gone we'll wonder why more weren't saved. I'd sooner see something like this car saved and driven than to have to cut to pieces for some "terminal rust bucket" that will never be worth all the time and money spent on it. Practicality and Logic need to be part of our thinking in this hobby we all enjoy but they should not be the only guide lines. This particular car looks to be a good/great entry level into our hobby. So I say go for it,enjoy it and the new hobby you've just started. We all understand or should that we can't save every car but this one looks like a saver to me. Just my 2 coppers worth....... 

I have to agree here also.  Not every car needs to be beautiful.  Not every car needs to be a 2 door or convertible.

 

In 2012, my wife and I bought a 63 Impala 4 door sedan.  Paid $6000 for it.  Had fun for two summers with it until we got the 61 Fleetwood.  Sold the Impala for $6000 (put a set of tires on it and a couple wheel bearings), so essentially we had $200 worth of fun for two summers.

 

Actually, to this day, we wish we would've never sold it.  We had more fun in that than we have had in our AACA Senior winner 1961 Fleetwood because we weren't afraid to scratch it, get a rock chip, or spill a soda on the carpet.

 

Buy it, get it running, have some fun with it, break even when you're done.  I agree, it looks like a nice entry level car.  For $1200, would you rather have this or a 10 year old Hyundai?

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It can't possibly be cheap enough.

Stop grabbing driftwood and put your resources towards something worthy.

 

I'm with Matt on this one- the buyer only seems to be interested in making money and that is not the car to do it. For you sentimental guys, if the buyer was interested in it for himself, I would agree with you.

All I see is a "quick flip" and I dont think this baby is going to sell quick...............

love the driftwood analogy!

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Good friend once said "There is an *ss for every seat." and all it takes is one person to want a '62 Newport 4-door for $1200 "where is and as is" and everyone is happy. Sounds like you came to the right place. Now if you had mentioned a dual quad engine with a typewriter and used as a crew car by the Ramchargers...

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More information please:

You say "non running". The ad you posted says " running condition" and lists some "desirable" options and additions. Which is it?

There have been sound opinions offered from both sides, but everyone is operating without much needed information...

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10 minutes ago, Phillip Cole said:

More information please:

You say "non running". The ad you posted says " running condition" and lists some "desirable" options and additions. Which is it?

There have been sound opinions offered from both sides, but everyone is operating without much needed information...

I think that post was a "comparison" type of ad like the one Nick originally posted.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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8 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

They can't all be saved and grabbing cars up because they're cheap just wastes resources that you could dedicate to finishing other cars. My father never learned that lesson. At one point we had 12 or 13 mediocre cars instead of one really great one. The crappy ones broke his spirit, gave him constant fits, required time and resources that he didn't have, and never gave him more than a fleeting moment of pleasure. Or he could have invested that money in something significant and high-quality and enjoyed the hobby.

 

Stop grabbing driftwood and put your resources towards something worthy. A battered old 4-door sedan doesn't need to be rescued or preserved for the future when someone else might possibly get around to restoring it.

 

Matt is spot on with his quote above (my dad has the same story, very well said) even though it sounds a bit harsh to George, who is also quite right about the benefit of a low cost sedan as a great entry into the hobby for someone.  However, I think Matt is probably getting a better read on Nick8086 as a guy who is not really into that car but just wants to make a quick buck.  At $1200 that is possible but it is not likely to be a hot ticket, especially if that fenderwell is made of bondo as it appears.  Nick, looks like you know Mopars, if it is solid and you can make it saleable and have a possible buyer then have at it and good luck, Todd C        

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5 hours ago, nick8086 said:

:o:o

both sides.JPG

 

Nick,

 

This appears to be a poorly done bondo job with apparently no attention paid to what appears to be a rusted inner fender.  I would not buy this car to flip, since proper body repairs (rust repairs) are very expensive.  The only way I'd buy this car would be to inspect it beyond what your photo shows to assess the possibility of making it a "cool" driver and never a "show" car.  I would not touch the car based on the information that you've provided.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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13 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

...and that color sure won't help at resale time...

 

Matt, can you tell us more?  I know that a white or off-white

car doesn't particularly appeal to me, but I didn't know 

that other people, too, feel that white is less desirable.

(There's a blandness, or washed-out feeling, about

a white car to me, even though this sedan is an interesting part of history.)

What colors are most popular these days?

Does body style affect the color choice--since white convertibles

seem to do well and can sometimes look sharp when they have red interiors?

 

I've also heard the saying, "If it's brown, it stays around."

Brown was popular in the 1970's, but not now.  Green may be coming back

to acceptability.  Your insights are appreciated.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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It depends. My Judge and Reatta 'vert are both an Arctic (hard) white,  GM code 10 & both have black accents. Is really ideal for a Hot climate. Agree there are a lot I do not care for (mostly ones with yellow like a code 40). BTW the black spoiler was a factory option. Factory agreed.

 

ps those are same decade factory 15x8 wheels with a bit more tire. I did not consider anything that fit the stock 14x6s to be safe at speed. Stockers did make a lot of tire smoke.

 

going.jpg

aftera1024.jpg

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Just a little history on the car.. In 1962 It was given to him to drive or it was his company car.. They would give upper manager a vehicle to use for work...   My dad bought the car from his employer..  

 

Matt - question... He put a 1972 400 in it... does it matter ?

 

 

 

 

 

62mopar.JPG

Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)
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4 hours ago, alsancle said:

There is nothing wrong with the model, and if you have a nice one that is great. The issue I have with this particular car is that it needs 25k worth of work to be a 6k car.

I'm curious how you came up with the 25K number from one so-so photo. Or have you seen the car?

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11 hours ago, alsancle said:

There is nothing wrong with the model, and if you have a nice one that is great. The issue I have with this particular car is that it needs 25k worth of work to be a 6k car.

 

 

It cost to make a car nice...  It was just painted 12 years ago... But he did not fix the rust... to make it a show car.. He just love having it... 

 

The only thing the car has going for it is the push button and the space  age dash... Which is neat...

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On April 29, 2016 at 7:33 PM, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Matt, can you tell us more?  I know that a white or off-white

car doesn't particularly appeal to me, but I didn't know 

that other people, too, feel that white is less desirable.

(There's a blandness, or washed-out feeling, about

a white car to me, even though this sedan is an interesting part of history.)

What colors are most popular these days?

Does body style affect the color choice--since white convertibles

seem to do well and can sometimes look sharp when they have red interiors?

 

I've also heard the saying, "If it's brown, it stays around."

Brown was popular in the 1970's, but not now.  Green may be coming back

to acceptability.  Your insights are appreciated.

 

I believe the proper statement is "if it's brown flush it down, if it's yellow let it mellow"

Edited by BillhymerMD (see edit history)
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If you love it, buy it, if not pass. You're way ahead financially to buy one as nice as you dream of getting that one to be. If you would be HAPPY with it just like it is than buy it for as little as possible and drive it. Never expect to sell it for very much because you won't if it stays like it is. It's not a highly desirable car and its a four door to make it even a little less desirable. You asked for an opinion, everyone has one.

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Actually $25k is cheap for a frame off - show quality.

 

Be better to say it looks like a #4, for  $3k-$4k you can make it a #3, 5x-10x that for a #2, and you can't make it a #1.

 

That said there are not many post war 4 doors that do not have suicides that would be worth even a #2.  ROI will never be great so would need a different reason which reminds me of Sandra Bullock's line at the end of Speed.

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On 4/28/2016 at 9:27 AM, Matt Harwood said:

My father never learned that lesson. At one point we had 12 or 13 mediocre cars instead of one really great one. The crappy ones broke his spirit, gave him constant fits, required time and resources that he didn't have, and never gave him more than a fleeting moment of pleasure. Or he could have invested that money in something significant and high-quality and enjoyed the hobby.

 

That was my Father also,

 

Since when has $1200 became a lot of money on this hobby?  I'm a Chevy guy and I would not even think twice about buying that car for $1200! Seems like it is all there. I had a 63 Dodge 880 I bought from a friend of mine very similar car except the nose was much more plain, I needed a car and did it run great! If you needed a knock around car or a commuter car I would rather have that then some Asian import with 300,000 miles. 

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