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'69 Riviera: 430 Engine P*rn, Woodgrain Kit, Shifter Handle & Steering Wheel


mannemerjung
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Hi everybody,

 

after getting so much great advice from the community, I thought it would be nice to share some R-rated pictures of my overhauled and re-painted engine and the woodgrain kit a friend of mine made for me. I went with a more mahagony-like shade and since I never really liked the plastic handle of the shifter, I decided to break out the dremel and some woodstain and re-do the handle out of real wood. To finish the whole mahagony theme I also stained the wooden steering wheel which will replace the cracked original to match the other inlays.

 

I hope you enjoy the pictures and thanks again for all your help.

 

Alexander

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Edited by mannemerjung (see edit history)
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The plastic parts were PVD coated. The coating is not as resistant against scratches as "real" chrome but the application is much easier and the adhesion to the plastic is better. In addition, PVD coating is less expensive and less toxic.

 

The faux wood inlays were scanned, digitally reproduced, printed onto self adhesive film and laminated with a matt transparent film. Light shines through the material. To avoid having illuminated boxes around the lettering when switching on the dash-lights, I stuck the new pieces onto the original ones which were made from thin metal sheets. The lettering lines up 99,85% and lights up nicely now. Trimming the pieces with an exacto knife, cutting out the holes, lining up the lettering and avoiding any bubbles and crinkles is grueling work and much cursing was involved, but I think it was totally worth it.

 

Alexander

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Edited by mannemerjung (see edit history)
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Randy,

PVD uses vacuum and high temperature to deposit a vaporized coating material (aluminium, chromium and other metals) on surfaces. A gas is added (mostly nitrogen) that reacts with the metal vapour and forms a compound that finally bonds with the surface of the object you want to coat. Since this is a one stage process, the material of the object that you want to coat is almost irrelevant. In comparison,regular chrome plating only works on metal objects or objects that were metallized so it's not really practical for plastic parts.

That being said, I would not call PVD chroming "cheap" but - at least here in Germany - it was the most economical solution for me.The three pieces you see on the pictures added up to 200€ (roughly $230).

I am pretty sure that there are shops in Canada and the States as well that offer PVD coating.

 

Alexander

 

P.S. I really like your profile picture!

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Thanks for the detailed PVD process description and the costs Alexander - considering the final results, it was time and expense well spent !

Those faux wood inlays are simply 'icing on the cake', and add a personal, mild custom look to the interior of your Riviera. 

There was a vendor in Canada doing PVD coating located in Vancouver, BC, but he closed shop about 5 years ago.

The only source I am aware of now is located in USA, and you pay in US dollars, which is +25% and shipping from Canada, so it can be expensive.

. . . appreciate the comment on profile pic - my pride 'n joy !

 

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  • 1 month later...

Definitely nice creative restoration work on this project. This is the kind of thing Riviera restorers have to do!

I just purchased some wheels for a trailer and while in selection process noticed some were PVD coated with a chrome look which lead me to research it as I had never heard of it. I was intrigued enough and tried to buy a set the of PVD wheels but they were out of stock. These wheels came from China so apparently they are a step ahead of us in this process. From the sound of it I bet we will hear more and more about it as time goes on. Sounds like an opportunity for an entrepreneur.

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  • 1 month later...
On 4/27/2016 at 4:35 PM, mannemerjung said:

Hi everybody,

 

after getting so much great advice from the community, I thought it would be nice to share some R-rated pictures of my overhauled and re-painted engine and the woodgrain kit a friend of mine made for me. I went with a more mahagony-like shade and since I never really liked the plastic handle of the shifter, I decided to break out the dremel and some woodstain and re-do the handle out of real wood. To finish the whole mahagony theme I also stained the wooden steering wheel which will replace the cracked original to match the other inlays.

 

I hope you enjoy the pictures and thanks again for all your help.

 

Alexander

20160315_2049211.jpg

20160315_2234522.jpg

20160315_2358333.jpg

20160317_2154444.jpg

20160318_0058145.jpg

20160326_0200056.jpg

20160327_2233017.jpg

20160416_0449478.jpg

20160420_2019059.jpg

20160420_20192010.jpg

20160420_23160411.jpg

20160420_23224012.jpg

20160427_21110113.jpg

Mechanical Fuel Pump?

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 16.8.2016 at 4:44 AM, Greymist69 said:

Mechanical Fuel Pump?

 

Yep!

Also, have a closer look at the driver side exhaust manifold - no heat shield.

Chassis- and engine-number match up, but there are obviously some irregularities to my engine. I simply assume that one of the previous owners did this. Probably when the electric fuel pump failed or the manifold cracked.

My approach to the restoration is not to bring it back to the point how the car was, when it left the factory, but to let it tell its story as long as that does not mean to live with "real flaws".  So I kept the engine as is and only took care of things that were mechanically wrong and the cosmetics.

 

Alexander

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