X-Frame

X or no X?

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but I have just a limited number of talents: I cannot cook, sing, skiing, plus a dozen other activities I either dislike or are above my possibilities!

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16 minutes ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

but I have just a limited number of talents: I cannot cook, sing, skiing, plus a dozen other activities I either dislike or are above my possibilities!

 

Your model building is a full time job as is.  And besides, if you can use a microwave then you can cook.  They have autotune now for singing.  And who wants to go 80-mph on two floor planks holding on either a rope behind a speeding boat creating wakes or holding two toothpicks to keep you from becoming tree pâté?  I rather have a feeling of being in control (and enclosed) going that fast. :D

 

Eric

 

 

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Eric, now that you are writing your first name, did you were for a time in the Mark II forum? Your question about the X frame let ring something in my head; your "name" was Huffstutler if I'm right?

How by the way, I can cook water. It's difficult, especially if it's boiling and I'm at my workbench!

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Getting back to the original post - any more comments about the transverse mounted X brace design?

 

As time went on, more variables showed up.  This include the design used on Chrysler products between 1932-1933 which is called an "X" girder even though it had odd length legs which looks more like a curved beam in the rear section.  But goes to show that manufacturers do call odd designs "X" designs.

 

 

33Lube2-reg2.jpg

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2 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Eric, now that you are writing your first name, did you were for a time in the Mark II forum? Your question about the X frame let ring something in my head; your "name" was Huffstutler if I'm right?

How by the way, I can cook water. It's difficult, especially if it's boiling and I'm at my workbench!

 

Roger, yes... I have been doing this research for at least 6 years concerning various X designs.  And yes, have been part of both the 1956-1957 Continental Mk II forums and helped you out with photographs years past.  Since I am only one of two people in the entire United States with my name, what would be the odds  :P

 

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On ‎2016‎-‎04‎-‎28 at 0:09 PM, X-Frame said:

 

I had learned not too long ago that the Wagonaires used the Lark Convertible chassis. 

The Wagonaire frame was unique to that model.  The convertible ran on a 109" wheelbase, while the Wagonaire had a 113" wheelbase.

 

Craig

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32 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

The Wagonaire frame was unique to that model.  The convertible ran on a 109" wheelbase, while the Wagonaire had a 113" wheelbase.

 

Craig

 

Sorry, used that in a generic sense.  I suspect that the frame looked similar in shape and structure though... any photos or illustrations of the Wagonaire chassis?

 

 

Edited by X-Frame (see edit history)

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There were two more oddities I recall. 

 

The 1935 Chevrolet Standard which used a X brace (not the V-K the Master used) and was used on that one model, one year only.

 

The same with the 1940 Chevrolet Cabriolet.  It had a massive, overbuilt but under engineered chassis that utilized stacked side rails, heavy cross members, off axis X legs, a large wolfs plate (large square plate covering the area where the axis should be).  Chevrolet declared it a disaster and used a more traditional X the following year on the convertibles.  I have yet to know why the 1940 design was even used and who came up  with that disaster of a chassis design used only on that car, model, one year only?

 

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Bringing this back to the top for the weekenders who may want to add to the discussion... thanks!

 

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Want to bring this topic back up and hope new members may have something to contribute.  I can add that the new London Taxi  TX5 is a unibody car and so, the TX4 was their last to use an X frame configuration.  Now, are there "any" cars (or trucks) being made, worldwide, that still uses a cruciform or X braced chassis frame?

 

Thanks!

 

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