CatBird

What is this AACA Award on my car? Pictures

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Your 1910 Franklin is shown as winning a National Junior in 1959 at Hershey in Class 14. This Class is for "Gas, vehicles, more than 4-cyl. 1908 through 1912" and includes some very impressive class winners over the years. For example: Bill Pollack's Chadwicks (1952 & 1953), Tom Lester's Thomas K 6-70 (1958), Sam Scher's Stevens-Duryea (1957) plus numerous Packards, Pierce-Arrows, and Rolls Royces. I remember seeing both Chadwicks at the Yorklyn meet in 1953 and they are outstanding cars. The Thomas is another spectacular early chain drive machine and I remember the early stages of its restoration.

 

As you probably know, A. H. Amick was very active in the H.H. Franklin Club and was the editor of the club publication, Aircooled News. Several of his articles appeared in the Antique Automobile. You certainly have an extremely interesting and noteworthy car and I hope you have it on the road and enjoy using it.

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Thank you for the information!  We are very active in the Franklin Club and enjoy driving this car very often.  Although I did not know Red Amick personally, I sure feel like I do from all of the printed material he produced and the stories about him.

 

image.jpeg

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It appears that our 1923 Depot Hack was awarded Junior car in 1955 or so. Thank you for your information.

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Earlier badges carry neither the "Year of Award", nor the badge serial number, as evidenced below.

 

Upon contacting AACA National Headquarters in Hershey, we were supplied with the badge nimber, and learned that our 1915 Hudson SIX-40 had been awarded her First Junior in 1957 at the Meet  held in Pottstown PA, and earned her Senior in 1961, with First Preservation and repeat Preservation being awarded in 1989.

 

Our Hudson was purchased around 1952 by Washington, DC Police Officer Fred Long of  Ijamsville, MD. Fred restored the big Hudson, showed it multiple times, and was well-respected for driving the car on many long-distance tours all over the east coast. I read an article, sent to me be Fred's grandson, noting that Fred, together with his wife and children, was the leader of a Horseless Carriage Club of America (HCCA) tour from the DC area to Niagara Falls and home again. When I displayed this car at the AACA Meet in Virginia Beach in 2015, shortly after acquiring it from Dave and Babe Lanning in Florida, I was amazed at how many people came by to tell me that they knew the car from when Fred owned it until his passing 13 or so years prior, or that they had ridden in the big Hudson with Fred.

 

I'm honored to be able to maintain a car with a known AACA history, from a respected member, and hope to carry on the tradition by driving the now-roadworthy '15 Hudson in our upcoming 2016 Reliability Tour of Savannah, Georgia in November, to be run in conjunction with our HCCA sister club.

1915 Hudson Badges.jpg

1915 Hudson Right Front 7-15.jpg

1915 Hudson Right Side.jpg

1915 Hudson Left Rear.jpg

1915 Hudson Speedometer and Oil Pressure Guage.jpg

1915 Hudson Right Rear.jpg

 

1915 Hudson Dash and Wheel.jpg

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)

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2 hours ago, Bill Caddyshack said:

It appears that our 1923 Depot Hack was awarded Junior car in 1955 or so. Thank you for your information.

 

According to the list of class 11 award winners, the first 1923 was in 1957, Pottstown, with S. Groy owner. Next 1923 was 1960, Ocean City, John Hay owner. Perhaps one of these is your car.   

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Wonderful to see the Franklin and Hudson outside and not gathering dust in some museum. They both look like great tour cars with six cylinder engines. Particularly like the Franklin with the huge running board spotlight and Non-Skid tires. Looks as though the picture of the car was taken in the winter so I'm sure you have plenty of anti-freeze in it ! :) 

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9 hours ago, A. Ballard 35R said:

 

According to the list of class 11 award winners, the first 1923 was in 1957, Pottstown, with S. Groy owner. Next 1923 was 1960, Ocean City, John Hay owner. Perhaps one of these is your car.   

 The seller I bought from our car owned it since 1971. He is not sure who was a previous owner, but I am digging. But it is possibly one of these cars.

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Marty:

 Thanks for posting photos of the Hudson. I wanted to see what you replaced the 1914 Buick with. I looked at the purchase of a very nice 1914-15? 6-40 Hudson at the Hershey car corral about 13 ? years ago. There was an executor for the estate of the deceased owner at the car whom we spoke to. They were asking $10,500. It was hard to walk away from that one.  I believe it went from owner to dealer to dealer for the next 2 years at Hershey.

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1 hour ago, dibarlaw said:

Marty:

 Thanks for posting photos of the Hudson. I wanted to see what you replaced the 1914 Buick with. I looked at the purchase of a very nice 1914-15? 6-40 Hudson at the Hershey car corral about 13 ? years ago. There was an executor for the estate of the deceased owner at the car whom we spoke to. They were asking $10,500. It was hard to walk away from that one.  I believe it went from owner to dealer to dealer for the next 2 years at Hershey.

 

Larry:

 

The timing of the estate and sale for the Hudson you noted would have been about the same, but may or may not be the same car. (was there a spare engine and other parts noted at that time?)

 

I believe that Fred's son (Fred, Jr.) sold the car directly to Dave Lanning, and that Dave had it for the entire time until I got it Easter Sunday, 2015. I've also been in touch with Fred Long's grandson Jim.

 

Obviously I paid A LOT MORE than the $10,500 price you were offered 13 years ago. Sorry you missed it - these are a very nice driving car. Of course our former '14 Buick B-37 was a great car as well - I just wanted a bigger car, and could not find a B-55 or C-55 Buick 6-cylinder at the time. I still want a 1915 (or early 1916) Cadillac Touring, but seem priced out of the market.

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)

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Funny, I was just reading this thread and thinking "Hey, I saw a Franklin day before yesterday that had a non-year AACA badge", and POOF there's a picture!

 

The CCCA has a long standing tradition of mounting an award badge on the right cowl of the car.  Two little holes don't hurt, in my mind, as the award stays on the car.  I just had a Packard owner (whose car I upholstered and topped) ask me should he drill holes for his new CCCA badge, and I said heck yeah, be proud of it!  ....just as stated above...

172.JPG

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When it comes time to sell a car those two holes that you drill add about $2,500 each to the value of the car, a lot more depending on what the car is. Bob

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