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What is this AACA Award on my car? Pictures

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I have just bought a 1923 Model T Depot hack. It has an AACA award that is probably at least more than 45 years old, because it was on the car when the previous seller bought it in 1971.

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1923 Model T (Small).JPG

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1923 Model T 1 (Small).JPG

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That is generally referred to as a "1st Junior Award" Grill Badge. It indicates that the vehicle received a first place award in the Junior Category at an AACA National Meet. The later ones show the year that the vehicle won the award. If you are looking for more information on the vehicle, you may want to contact AACA Headquarters. Given the vehicle's serial number, they may be able to find the records to show when and where it received the award and who owned it at the time it received the award.  

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Thanks, will check, and email the VIN# to AACA. I am curious about that I have not seen a year badge before. Here is another car we have in our 1958 Cadillac. I wonder if the badge on the 1923 Depot Hack is earlier and before they added the year as below.

 

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Edited by Bill Caddyshack (see edit history)

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I did check with someone at the AACA and they said they thought that all badges had a year number, and the badges began in 1963.

 

Before that date, they gave out trophies.

 

I gave the serial number of our hack, and they are checking further. But they think it is "strange" to see our badge with no year number.

 

They could be mistaken. Would like to know more. I don't think that someone made a fake badge? The badge is very well made.

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5 hours ago, Bill Caddyshack said:

I did check with someone at the AACA and they said they thought that all badges had a year number, and the badges began in 1963.

They could be mistaken. Would like to know more. I don't think that someone made a fake badge? The badge is very well made.

 

Whoever you talked to in the office undoubtedly is mistaken, not being 

aware of all the history of AACA's awards.  Director Steve Moskowitz

there in the office probably would know, however.

 

And there's no logic to the "fake badge" theory in this case.  The maker of a fake badge would 

try to make it look just like the original:  So if the badge was a fake, without a date, that means that

the original would have had no date, thereby demonstrating that badges really

were issued without dates.  

 

It looks like the older AACA award badge is enameled, and even has some relief.

Though the new ones enhance any car they're on, the old one appears to have better

(more expensive) quality of production.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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No offense to any member or to the club, but I just can't imagine drilling two holes in a car in order to affix that badge. 

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8 hours ago, Pomeroy41144 said:

No offense to any member or to the club, but I just can't imagine drilling two holes in a car in order to affix that badge. 

 

Yeah, someone used nails to affix the badge on our Depot Hack. Perhaps I should get some wood putty? :rolleyes: 

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CCCA members have no problem drilling two holes in the right side of the cowl to attach their award. I had no problem drilling two holes in the engine turned dash of my Riley 4Port years ago. Guess it depends on the era of the vehicle. Bob  P. S. some people don't mind drilling two more after they win a National Award. Bob

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They don't even drill holes for trim any more.

Its all adhesives.

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5 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

All depends on how proud you are of the award.

 

 

I would be honored to win an AACA or CCCA award had I a car that qualified as an AACA winner or a prize winning recognized classic at CCCA, but rather than drill holes in my car's sheet metal I think I would spend the $100 for a nicely sculpted finished piece of wood with a plaque attached signifying the event, date and car along with the AACA Prize Badge. 

Edited by Pomeroy41144 (see edit history)

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The AACA sells a brass badge mount that can affix in a number of ways to the car.I fasten mine using a bumper bolt .  They also affix nicely to most car grilles.  There are lost of ways that don't involve "drilling holes"  That being said, an AACA national award is something to be very proud of and surely adds value to thecar that wins it!!!

 

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11 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

All depends on how proud you are of the award.

Hmm, you may like a 1958 Cadillac Eureka Flower Car? I do. :rolleyes:

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This1913 Buick I offered on had the badges tacked everywhere. It had a similar undated badge centered below the "1913 BUICK". I have seem many of the early (1950s-60s hobby participants) tack them on the cowl and anywhere else that would fit. It seemed to be the thing to do at the time. Others have a display board to show the awards.

.DSCF4707.JPGDSCF4705.JPG

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Nice tour plaque collection on that '13 Buick, I'd love to find a 1950 Glidden Tour plaque for my 1912 T. The old brass car restorations look so nice with the tour plaques. bob

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We use to do the same thing with antique Farm Engines. A lot of the shows we went to would give out a plaque for displaying at the shows, and we would tack them to the battery box, or on on the wooden Skids in the 1970's. One of the first ones I got the printing washed off of it while cleaning the oil off of it with a gas soaked rag. After that, I put them in a drawer and kept them nice. 

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15 hours ago, DAVE A said:

The AACA sells a brass badge mount that can affix in a number of ways to the car.I fasten mine using a bumper bolt .  They also affix nicely to most car grilles.  There are lost of ways that don't involve "drilling holes"  That being said, an AACA national award is something to be very proud of and surely adds value to thecar that wins it!!!

 

 

I would agree that an award may add value to a car.

However I wont buy the idea of drilling holes to mount it would add any value, rather the opposite.

That would suggest that the AACA award trumps the originality of the said vehicle.

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We always mount them on brackets or on the grill on newer cars. There is always a way to do it without resorting to nails or screws. If your car wins a First Junior the plaque needs to be on the car to compete for a Senior Award.

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The March 1993 green AACA booklet of all National Award and Trophy Winners shows many 1923's in Class 11 (Model T's) along with the year and place the award was won. The list starts with the first National Winners at the 1952 Spring Meet in Pottstown, Pa., through the 1992 Hershey Fall Meet. Unfortunately, there are no body styles shown making it very difficult to know which of the 15+ cars listed is the one on the pretty Depot Hack owned by Bill and Anne. If you supply the name of previous owners it could probably be identified.

 

it is very strange that there is no year on the plaque. The 1924 Stanley that my father used to own won a junior at the 1953 Devon Meet and the plaque, exactly like the one you show, had the date stamped on it.

Edited by A. Ballard 35R
Clarification (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, A. Ballard 35R said:

... The 1924 Stanley that my father used to own won a junior at the 1953 Devon Meet and the plaque, exactly like the one you show, had the date stamped on it.

 

It would be interesting to see a picture of that 1953 award plaque.

I've never seen one that old.

 

Even farther back in time, the AACA logo on various items

had the U's in the old Latin style, looking like V's:

thus, ANTIQVE AVTOMOBILE CLVB OF AMERICA.

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I had previously noted elsewhere that this badge is genuine and common.  For a time we did not imprint the year.  As stated here there are too many 23's to choose from and the serial number is not in our database.  We would need to know the previous owner's name or the met it was shown at...sorry.

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1 hour ago, Olympic33 said:

We have one on our Franklin which I believe is from 1954.

 

image.jpeg

 

Who said that anti-theft devices were new? That looks like an effective locking mechanism.

 

Can't find any Franklin winners for 1954. What class would the car be in?

Edited by A. Ballard 35R
word omitted (see edit history)

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Good question on which class and I don't really know as we've never entered in in an AACA show before.  This may be from '55.  The last name was Amick.

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