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unknown dynaflow


jajolee

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Just a guess until I check my books, but looks like it came from a 1953 Oldsmobile or Cadillac.  I see the rear output shaft does not look like there was ever a torque ball as Buick used with the torque tube closed driveshaft system.  Also the bell housing looks like it has "ears" that I have seen on Olds/Cadillac Dynaflows.  Dynaflows were used in Oldsmobiles and Cadillacs only in 1953 because the Hydramatic plant burned to the ground and so GM fitted Dynaflows to these cars that would normally have had Hydramatics

Joe, BCA 33493

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thanks

they almost look the same only the ears on the bellhousing arn't there

I know for sure that it isn't buick

I find it strange that the converter is bigger than the bellhousing.

 

thanks

jan

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22 minutes ago, jajolee said:

thanks

they almost look the same only the ears on the bellhousing arn't there

I know for sure that it isn't buick

I find it strange that the converter is bigger than the bellhousing.

 

thanks

jan

It is not Buick or Cadillac, so it must be Oldsmobile.

There was probably an adapter between the bellhousing and the engine.

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Based on the photos of the bell housing this is definitley from an Oldsmobile.  The Cadillac and Olds bell housings were about 1/2 the depth of the Buick bell housing on these Dynaflows.

The torque converter and the clutch pack and other internals were the same for Buick and Olds.  Parts on Cadillac torque converter will not fit others and only some internal parts will fit.   All three oil pans are different.

Heater hose routings on Cadillac and Olds had to be modified to provide cooling for the Dynaflow heat exchanger; Hydramatic did not need cooling.

Joe, BCA 33493

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I just had a wild a$$ed thought.  If that transmission was found in Belgium, who's to say that it's not a transmission from an M18 Hellcat Tank Destroyer.  Buick division built the M18. I don't like quoting Wikipedia but "..... It (dynaflow) received some severe early testing in the M18 Hellcat tank destroyer, which were built in Buick's Flint, Michigan assembly plant during World War II."

 

What better place to find World War II items than it the countries in which the war was fought.  The ears on the side would allow for quick removal of the entire drivetrain for maintenance.  Just a thought. :)  Anyone else?

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4 minutes ago, RivNut said:

I just had a wild a$$ed thought.  If that transmission was found in Belgium, who's to say that it's not a transmission from an M18 Hellcat Tank Destroyer.  Buick division built the M18. I don't like quoting Wikipedia but "..... It (dynaflow) received some severe early testing in the M18 Hellcat tank destroyer, which were built in Buick's Flint, Michigan assembly plant during World War II."

 

What better place to find World War II items than it the countries in which the war was fought.  The ears on the side would allow for quick removal of the entire drivetrain for maintenance.  Just a thought. :)  Anyone else?

Now that would be cool

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Can anyone decode the date stamp that's was screwed into the mold before the trans was cast?

 

I found this reference on Buick.net

 

NOTE: Following markings are stamped on aluminum plate low on the transmission, on left side and between the main transmission case and the front pump housing.
IDENTITY
LETTER
USAGE
H '53 40 ser.
J '53 50, 70 ser.
K or M '54 40,60 ser.
P '56 All
R '57 All
S '58 All
T '55 50, 70 ser.
W '59 All
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thank for the replies

I don't think the trans came out a M18 because the M18 has a radiaal engine and a different gear box

it sure would be nice

 

there is no number on the aluminium casing

I think it is olds

I have a oolds engine in my barn and the bolt pattern looks the same

DSCF6458.JPG

DSCF6462.JPG

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The 1953 Buick Technical Service Bulletin shows the Dynaflow in both Cadillac and Olds installations.  The illustration of the Olds bell housing shows the ears.  Perhaps an Olds expert might know what the ears were used for, perhaps for some kind of frame mount.

Joe, BCA 33493

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I found a reference to a 1953 Buick using the casting number on the transmission body.  Perhaps the casting number on the bell housing might be a clue as to the application for this particular unit.  The bellhousing part of the dynaflow could be separated from the actual transmission body.  Perhaps when the fire occured at the Hydra-matic plant all GM would have had to do to mount the dynaflow in a Cad, Olds, or Pontiac would be to cast a different bellhousing and they'd be back into production.  ?????

 

Ed

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