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Favorite Pictures of My Pre War Buick


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Repainting the inlays is the easiest thing in the world and one of the quickest ways to give your car a sharper look.  Just get some black paint (I used Rustoleum semi-gloss), apply a generous coat in the recess, and wipe off the excess with a clean rag and you're done.  If you don't get all the excess, you can just wait until it dries and carefully get it with paint thinner.  Trust me, you can do this -- you don't need a steady hand!

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That may be true for the average bloke but you’re dealing with me! I did the inlays on the front turning signal light housings and center grill emblem and it drove me nuts trying to get a clean edge everywhere. I’ll try your technique as mine obviously sucks. I still need to do the hood latch trim and hood ornament. Lots of tiny inlays on these ‘41s!

  

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3 minutes ago, valk said:

That may be true for the average bloke but you’re dealing with me! I did the inlays on the front turning signal light housings and center grill emblem and it drove me nuts trying to get a clean edge everywhere. I’ll try your technique as mine obviously sucks. I still need to do the hood latch trim and hood ornament. Lots of tiny inlays on these ‘41s!

  

I don't have a very steady hand either. The method that I use is to apply the paint with a small paint brush doing my best to not make too much of a mess, waiting a few minutes for the paint to dry a bit, and then using light pressure with a goo gone paint removal wipe, wipe the paint off of the raised portions. I do a lot of paint fill on engraved items and this method works well for me. 

 

https://googone.com/paint-clean-up-wipes

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18 hours ago, neil morse said:

I was staring at the hood ornament on my '41 today and realized, for the first time, that it's not just a blob of chrome, but was clearly inspired by the streamline steam locomotives of the '30's.

 

hood_ornamentE.thumb.jpg.de134fa5aa6b9bfd6058207924c8f9d4.jpg

 

UnionPacificStreamliner.thumb.jpg.5722e779c6da234dc396358299ebc3ed.jpg

 

I thought this was interesting because it's an indication that, as of 1941, the locomotive was still regarded as the pinnacle of power.  Remember, Superman was "more powerful than a locomotive!"  After the war, of course, automotive design imagery shifted to the airplane and the rocket ship, with the P-38 inspired '48 Cadillac and the '49 Oldsmobile Rocket 88.

Hi Neil, what a fabulous observation by your good self. Since owning my '41, I've felt it's a shame the Buick hood ornaments weren't as 'inspired' as the Chevy versions (which are quite stunning over this whole period). From now on however, I will always see that fabulous train when I look over my hood. Many thanks for sharing!

Edited by Grant Z (see edit history)
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On 12/3/2020 at 11:03 PM, neil morse said:

I was staring at the hood ornament on my '41 today and realized, for the first time, that it's not just a blob of chrome, but was clearly inspired by the streamline steam locomotives of the '30's.

 

hood_ornamentE.thumb.jpg.de134fa5aa6b9bfd6058207924c8f9d4.jpg

 

UnionPacificStreamliner.thumb.jpg.5722e779c6da234dc396358299ebc3ed.jpg

 

I thought this was interesting because it's an indication that, as of 1941, the locomotive was still regarded as the pinnacle of power.  Remember, Superman was "more powerful than a locomotive!"  After the war, of course, automotive design imagery shifted to the airplane and the rocket ship, with the P-38 inspired '48 Cadillac and the '49 Oldsmobile Rocket 88.

 

Neil,

 

Great comparison, and got me thinking about my '37 Roadmaster 80C:

58702C28-1489-4E78-A7C6-2E991A064A4E.jpeg

C6540EF9-0B71-4752-8571-BE3B410994C0.jpeg

4D251ECA-C365-4422-B449-AE1792AAC416.jpeg

3E672EFD-FF92-4DB4-B960-4C83D96D4F30.jpeg

Edited by Marty Roth
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That one seems a bit more ambiguous to me.  I think it's intended to represent "speed," but it seems that it could be a train, a boat, or a plane.  It's the tapering tail of the '41 ornament that really seems to say "train" to me.

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22 hours ago, jvelde said:

Beautiful car Dave, where have you been, have missed seeing your great photo posts!

Thank you for the kind words, much appreciated.

 

Just busy. Trying to contribute more to the Forums now.

 

The Model A below was keeping me busy this past summer.

I bought it in June.

 

Please excuse me for placing it in a Buick forum.

#2 Nov.6,2020.jpg

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On 1/3/2021 at 9:12 PM, jenz38 said:

Her'e some Pics from my since 17 Years everlasting-project-vacation-race-fun-'38 Special Coupe 😉 :

 

 

20191101_082433.jpg

That is 1 very cool car there. I love it. What have you done to the motor?

 

 

 

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Overbored to 84mm BMW Car Pistons ,block decked, head milling 2mm, bigger I+E valves with 8mm stems,

hydr. Lifter switched over to mech. from a 248 3 speed Engine, complete Intake and Exhaust porting Job, mild cam,balanced Crankshaft and Rods, custom flywheel 3 kg lighter and balanced , boltcircle matched for a Dynaflow Crankshaft to fit to my 3 speed Box with a Cherokee 4.0 Clutch.

Compound Carb Manifolds, dual 2,5" exhaust with smithys ,two Big 97Strombergs with bigger jets, Holley marine stainless Airfilter, 

12 V Pertronix Ignition with lighter Weights in the Distributor ,Flametrower Coil, copper Plugswires (w/o any internal resistance),

Had preparing the Oil main gallery in the Block for full (7/8" inner diameter) oil filtering and external spin on adapter with one big Oilfilter ,also an Oilcooler in front of my Radiator.

hidden automatic electric Fan in front of my Radiator for a nice cool down after stop the hot Engine, better cooling in traffic jam, no permanent Fan noise, healthy Water pump Bearings, better engine accelerating, more space and no danger for my fingers in engine compartment while engine running.

 

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So cool, kinda surprised you choose Strombergs over Carters but I’m sure you checked it out. Too good for the Race of Gentlemen but would kinda fit in. 

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Valk,

Yes

I don't like this modern and rugged style of the Carter ,the Choke mechanic,

and for my fine tune important  the many available Jets ,levers and linkage like the  classic clean looking prewar correct Stromberg.

I had think about other pre war Carb models..,the Holley 81 too,but I've seen so many problems with all this Carbs that using vacuum Powervalves ,especially  the risk for blowing a PV while a possible backfire.

 

Bruce ,

I'm in the 7,5 to 8 comp ratio range with oem Wristpins and Rods.., not so high because I like it sounds smooth and nondescript in Idle. Also because of the historical registration I have.

The Government, Police,and the Tüv (technical inspection every second year) don't like loud,rough "hot rods". 

Since the last years they are very hard here with  american customs and all kind of Rods.  Somtimes they make big Police controls in front of Car meetings and they confiscated them to check for street legal and clean Paper.

 

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12 hours ago, jenz38 said:

Overbored to 84mm BMW Car Pistons ,block decked, head milling 2mm, bigger I+E valves with 8mm stems,

hydr. Lifter switched over to mech. from a 248 3 speed Engine, complete Intake and Exhaust porting Job, mild cam,balanced Crankshaft and Rods, custom flywheel 3 kg lighter and balanced , boltcircle matched for a Dynaflow Crankshaft to fit to my 3 speed Box with a Cherokee 4.0 Clutch.

Compound Carb Manifolds, dual 2,5" exhaust with smithys ,two Big 97Strombergs with bigger jets, Holley marine stainless Airfilter, 

12 V Pertronix Ignition with lighter Weights in the Distributor ,Flametrower Coil, copper Plugswires (w/o any internal resistance),

Had preparing the Oil main gallery in the Block for full (7/8" inner diameter) oil filtering and external spin on adapter with one big Oilfilter ,also an Oilcooler in front of my Radiator.

hidden automatic electric Fan in front of my Radiator for a nice cool down after stop the hot Engine, better cooling in traffic jam, no permanent Fan noise, healthy Water pump Bearings, better engine accelerating, more space and no danger for my fingers in engine compartment while engine running.

 

Fabulous, many thanks for all that info. You have done some serious work there. My car runs a stock 248 with single factory Stromberg carby, but the car is more custom (low & slow) so I'm happy with it and everything works superbly. I haven't the energy & knowledge to do what you have done especially when my car works & runs superbly (I use it often). Cheers Grant

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On 1/5/2021 at 1:35 AM, jenz38 said:

Valk,

Yes

I don't like this modern and rugged style of the Carter ,the Choke mechanic,

and for my fine tune important  the many available Jets ,levers and linkage like the  classic clean looking prewar correct Stromberg.

I had think about other pre war Carb models..,the Holley 81 too,but I've seen so many problems with all this Carbs that using vacuum Powervalves ,especially  the risk for blowing a PV while a possible backfire.

 

Bruce ,

I'm in the 7,5 to 8 comp ratio range with oem Wristpins and Rods.., not so high because I like it sounds smooth and nondescript in Idle. Also because of the historical registration I have.

The Government, Police,and the Tüv (technical inspection every second year) don't like loud,rough "hot rods". 

Since the last years they are very hard here with  american customs and all kind of Rods.  Somtimes they make big Police controls in front of Car meetings and they confiscated them to check for street legal and clean Paper.

 

 

 Thanks, Jenz.  

  I ended up with 9.5 to 1 on mine.    I would like to do another, if life gives me the time.  Would you mind sharing part numbers or other info on the BMW pistons?       

 

  Ben 

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I have no idea how they did in that race, but we commented as we passed them when leaving L.A.;  "They're smoking a lot, good thing they have TEXACO behind them."   Later in day one we saw them beside the road.   

Explanation:  Each morning we did a speedometer calibration run to

adjust our to the races computer speeds and it was common to see other cars and pass them.   During the day if we saw others, somebody was WRONG.   We started at one minute intervals.

 

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My car is is at the bottom of the pic, the touring car with the top down.

 

I love the taxi spray painted yellow right over the spare tire.

 

Bronx River Parkway, oldest freeway in America. Late 1920's.

 

Can anybody identify any makes and models?

 

BronxRiver.jpg

Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)
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On 10/5/2020 at 2:39 PM, Ronnie said:

A lot of posts have been hidden because they don't belong here. This topic is about Favorite Pictures of Pre War Buicks. 

 

 

Actually, the key word here is "My" ....  "Favorite Pictures of My Pre War Buicks. The last few posts appear not to be following that subject line. I mean for a moment I was getting all exited over @West Peterson new chop top Buick 🙂

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Proud owner of this 1931 Series 90 Roadster. Other than a stout sorting session when purchased, it is complete and a pleasure to drive. If anyone has a good light switch assembly for the end of the steering gear, I'm looking for one! Thanks.

tour 5.JPG

George and Buick.jpg

Buick Front.jpg

Buick Rear.jpg

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7 minutes ago, neil morse said:

That's looking great, Robby!  What's going on there on the top of the dash right in front of the steering wheel?

Somewhere in the past they cut an opening just above the vacuum wiper motor for easier access. Seen it before on other buicks. Hard to repair unfortunate 

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2 hours ago, Robby120113 said:

Somewhere in the past they cut an opening just above the vacuum wiper motor for easier access. Seen it before on other buicks. Hard to repair unfortunate 

 

Yes, it's unfortunate, but having pulled my dash apart and removed the wiper motor, I can certainly understand why someone would do that.

 

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