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1939 lincoln zephyr conv.


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My father left me his 39 lincoln zephyr conv.The car was restored and stunning but has a few problems .when the engine gets hot it wont start,and it seems to skip quite abit.the engine has new rings ,points, wires, starter rebuilt , double positive ground, 8 volt battery.the radiator was cleaned, water pumps were checked.carb rebuilt...i pulled the plugs and they were black.....iam going to try another set of autolite 216s........any ideas????I would also like to know what the approx. value of the car is. I can send some pics.<BR> thank you <BR> chris

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Hi Guys'Heres my input, Rolf is right about the COIL, I belive the carbon brushes that ride the twin rotors could be worn down and are not making contact properly, and to determine that the points are firing with a blue spark,[CAUSION REMOVE THE FAN AND THE FAN BELT} and then remove both distributor caps turn on the ignition and watch the points open and close on each side[YOU WILL NEED A HELPER} and possibly a mirror TO DO THIS} unless you have remote starter with wires long enough. NOTE if you see arching on either side from the points this is most likely caused by the carbon brushes not making proper contact<P>I also suggest on the spark plugs that if you use Resister plugs you can get AC'S R-45's or the 216's and set the gap at .035 buy a few extra and index them so that the electrode is facing toward the combustion chaimber <P>My other point is that if you want to syncronize the points you can do this if you have a dwell meter { MAKE SURE THE FAN IS OFF}, remove the advance plate on the right side of the distributor and you will see a slotted screw head which adjusts the stationary side of the points to allow one to syncronize the points on the distributor cam, you will also require a vacum gage in addition to the dwell meter, the dwell should read 28 to 30 or about 55 to 60 percent.If you don't have a dwell meter just use your vacum gage to read it's highest point of vacum, this will get you close to the sycronization setting.<P>What the Spark plug manufactures don't tell you is that on older cars that were built prior to the resister plug is that the gap must be increased from the orignal tolerances of say .025 to .028 for your lincoln by .007 using the high side of the tolerance's in your case the .028 should be .035. If you need info on indexing the spark plugs you can e-mail me at juhasz@teknett.com<P>PS try the spark plug settings first, I'm sure you will be amazed, besides indexing them.<BR>Bill Uhouse smile.gif" border="0

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Hi Chris, Sorry you lost your dad, but he certainly left you an interesting and valuable car. There was a Vic Piano on this forum some time ago who had recently acquired a car like yours, look in the older posts, and get his address. The other problems sound like basic tune up stuff, a sooty condition on the plugs is usually a rich mixture, but can also be weak spark, or an out of synch distributor, see Jake Fleming for a rebuilt coil, and Bill Uhouse for setting the distributor and sparkplug wires, I would stick with Champion H10 plugs, they are still available from tractor houses and the Ford Obsolete houses, lots of places on the net to go through the carburetor, check the compression on all 12 cyklinders, and it should purr like the proverbial kitten, Good Luck

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